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Expert Malnev gave tips on detecting Keylogger

Alexey Malnev, head of the Jet CSIRT Information Security Monitoring and Incident Response Center of Jet Infosystems, spoke about how to detect a Keylogger.

According to the expert, this can be done by scanning the computer with antivirus software, as well as thanks to the built-in EDR (Endpoint Detection and Response) system that analyzes the processes and their memory operation within the operating system.

In the case of corporate devices, a traffic inspection system will help, which can detect a connection over a suspicious Protocol or to a suspicious server on the Internet. The presence of an incident monitoring center in an organization can help detect an entire cyber operation of attackers on its infrastructure, or targeted attacks.

According to the expert, the presence of Keylogger can be considered a symptom of a complete hacking of the user's computer, and this is very bad news for the user. The fact is that modern malicious software most often uses Keylogger as one of many modules.

"There is a high probability that there is already a whole set of other potential problems: theft of confidential files from the hard disk, interception of account data, hidden audio and video recording (if there are a microphone and video camera), the potential destruction of data (if there is a malicious ransomware encryption module), full remote access,” said he.

In such cases, users should immediately disconnect the computer from the local network and the Internet, and then, without restarting it, hand it over to specialists in cybercriminalism. According to Malnev, it is more important to determine how the computer was attacked.

Delving into PoSeidon malware

News of data breaches that have been occurring through card usage at infected point of sale (PoS) systems at retailers has become common now-a-days. There being a huge market for stolen credit card information, the companies are being targeted with newer and sophisticated malwares.

How do these malwares exactly work? During investigation of the cases of breaches, CISCO security solutions have discovered the working mechanism a new malware family which has been nicknamed PoSeidon malware.

The infection of the PoS system possibly arises from a keylogger which after getting installed deletes the profile log in information i.e passwords stored on the system. This forces the user to type down the information which gets recorded by the keylogger and sent back to the server which can then access the system remotely to infiltrate it with the Loader malware to steal card information.

What the Loader does is, it tries to get itself installed in the PoS system as a service that is run as Winhost, so that it can survive reboots of the system. This step is called persistence by which it maintains hold on the system. It then connects to the hardcoded command and control servers, which then sends the second executable part of the malware called the FindStr.

It also simultaneously installs another keylogger. FindStr goes through data on the infected system to look for number sequences that start with 6, 5, 4 with a length of 16 digits (Discover, Visa, Mastercard) or 3 with a length of 15 digits (AMEX).

It then runs the Luhn algorithm to verify whether its card information or not and sends the information along with data from keylogger to the exfiltration servers from where it can be harvested for further usage.

The malware can also update itself depending on communication from external server. Further investigation shows that developers are working to use these in other newer projects.Faced with such persistent threats organizations need to be vigilant and adopt a threat-centric approach to provide security during the full attack continuum – before, during, and after an attack.