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HP Issues Advisory Informing Users to Expect SSD Failure around October 2020


Computer enterprise company HP (Hewlett Packard Enterprise) warns its customers about a bug that it has recently found in its SSD (Solid State Drives). The company HP has made a new firmware patch to prevent some of its hard drives from crashing after 40,000 hours of consumer use. In a firmware incident last week, HP informed its consumers about a bug in some of its hard drives that will cause them to stop working after 40,000 hours of use, which is around four years and 200 days. SAS SSDs (Serial-Attached SCSI solid-state drives) is the model of the hard drives that are likely to be affected by this firmware bug.


According to HP, the hard disks manufactured during that period will crash around October this year, and these will be among the earliest failures. To solve this issue, HP has released some firmware updates to fix this bug last week. It has asked the companies to update to the latest firmware updates, and if they fail to do so, the companies might risk losing both the SSD and the data. If the SSD crashes, users can't restore their data, says HP in its security advisory.

This firmware bug incident is similar to another hard drive crash incident that happened in November last year. In the latter event, the HPE SAS SSDs crashed after nearly three years and 270 days of use. This time, however, this bug will affect far fewer SSDs than it did last year. According to HP, the company learned about this issue from a different SSD company that uses HP's SSDs, similar to last year. The list of SAS SSD models affected by the bug is available on HP's customer support website.

"This HPD8 firmware is considered a critical fix and is required to address the issue detailed below. HPE strongly recommends the immediate application of this crucial fixture. Neglecting to update to SSD Firmware Version HPD8 will result in drive failure and data loss at 32,768 hours of operation and require restoration of data from the backup in non-fault tolerance, such as RAID 0 and fault tolerance RAID mode if more drives fail than what is supported by the fault tolerance RAID mode logical drive," reads HP's notification.

Multiple Vulnerabilities found in SATCOM internet access terminal Cobham EXPLORER 710



CERT/CC researchers found multiple vulnerabilities as they examined Satcom terminal Cobham EXPLORER 710 as an extension of IOActive’s findings in 2014. These new vulnerabilities could affect both the device and firmware.

These frailties could give attackers unauthentic access to sensitive information, control of the device, create or implant backdoor, DoS attack and more.

Cobham EXPLORER 710 is a portable satellite terminal, broadband global area network (bgan) through telephony. The device provides internet connection through satellite communications setting new standards for size, speed and features.

 EXPLORER 710 is a sophisticated communication tool for broadcasting, streaming and other IP based industry applications with a speed of 1 Mbps and higher. It is used in various sectors as Commercial aerospace, military defenses, space systems, SATCOM and more.

 The sat-com terminal, firmware version 1.07 is affected with 6 vulnerabilities listed below-

 • CVE-2019-9529 – Authentication Failure 

This failure arises due to the web portal having no authentication by default, this could lead to any attacker connected to the device to gain access to the portal and perform changes.

 • CVE-2019-9530 – Unrestricted Directory Access

There are no restrictions on access to the webroot directory, creating a liability as hackers can read, access or download any file in the webroot directory.

 • CVE-2019-9531 – Authentication Failure to port 5454 

This vulnerability allows attackers to connect to port 5454 through Telnet and execute 86 Attention (AT) commands, and gain illegal access.

 • CVE-2019-9532 – Text Data Exchange 

The web application portal passes the login password in cleartext, it could easily give way to miscreant to intercept the password.

 • CVE-2019-9533 – Default Login Credentials

The root password is the same for all devices, this could allow to reverse-engineer the password in all available versions.

 • CVE-2019-9534 – Validate Failure

According to CERT/CC researchers, "The device does not validate its firmware image. Development scripts left in the firmware can be used to upload a custom firmware image that the device runs. This could allow an unauthenticated, local attacker to upload their own firmware that could be used to intercept or modify traffic, spoof or intercept GPS traffic, exfiltrate private data, hide a backdoor, or cause a denial-of-service."

Apart from the above gaps in security, the researchers also discovered some configuration issues, missing security headers and problems in default wifi password ( being same as same as serial number) which are gravely dangerous to the device and leave it susceptible to cross-site scripting and clickjacking.

 The researchers said they currently don't have any practical solutions to these problems.