Search This Blog

Showing posts with label Zero-day vulnerability. Show all posts

Zoom Zero-Day Allowed Remote Code Execution, Patch Issued


Video and audio conferencing software, Zoom patched a zero-day vulnerability that was affecting users running old versions of Windows: Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2 and earlier. The flaw was detected on Thursday and later published in a blog post by security research organization ACROS Security.

The vulnerability that was previously unknown, allowed a remote attacker to execute arbitrary code on targeted user’s system on which one of the supported versions of Zoom Client for Windows is installed; in order to set the attack into motion, the attacker manipulates the victim into carrying out some typical action (Opening a received doc. file) and reportedly, there is no security warning displayed to the user as the attack takes place.


After disclosing the zero-day vulnerability to Zoom, ACROS released a micropatch for its 0patch client in order to safeguard its own clients against attack till the time Zoom came out with an official patch. In the wake of various security flaws, the company halted the production of new features for a while so that the major privacy-related concerns that are threatening user security can be treated with much-needed attention. However, this ‘feature freeze’ period ended very recently i.e., on July 1, last week itself, and the zero-day was detected a few days later.


In conversation with Threatpost, 0patch’s co-founder, Mitja Kolsek said, “Exploitation requires some social engineering – which is practically always the case with user-side remote code execution vulnerabilities,”


“While a massive attack is extremely unlikely, a targeted one is conceivable." “Zoom Client features a fairly persistent auto-update functionality that is likely to keep home users updated unless they really don’t want to be,” he wrote.


“However, enterprise admins often like to keep control of updates and may stay a couple of versions behind, especially if no security bugs were fixed in the latest versions.”


“Zoom takes all reports of potential security vulnerabilities seriously. This morning we received a report of an issue impacting users running Windows 7 and older. We have confirmed this issue and are currently working on a patch to quickly resolve it,” said Zoom, while addressing the issue initially.


A few days later, on July 10, a fix was released by the company and the officials said, "Zoom addressed this issue, which impacts users running Windows 7 and older, in the 5.1.3 client release on July 10. Users can help keep themselves secure by applying current updates or downloading the latest Zoom software with all current security updates from https://zoom.us/download.”

LeeHozer and Moobot Have The Same Attack Maneuvers?


Sharing has become a thing with cyber-criminals and their malware mechanisms. Reportedly, LeetHozer botnet was found to have similar attack tactics as that of the Mootbot malware family. Researchers have reasons to think that the party that created the Moobot also could be the ones who created the LeetHozer.

Per researchers, the LeetHozer botnet has been counting on other kinds of malware for a little bit of sharing here and there. Per sources, it has in the past used the loader and reporter system that the Mirai uses.

Apparently, despite using the same mechanisms as Mirai the LeetHoxer threat was a little different. According to researchers, other Mirai variations too were altered including the encryption procedure, the bot program, and the command and control protocol. The unique "string and downloader" too were revealed to be of the same kind as Mirai.

Per reports, the botnet was noticed when it was found to be manipulating a vulnerability in the “telenet service” of a device. It made use of the default password to get access to the device. Once the device got infected the LeetHozer sent the information of the device to its reporter mechanism which then got to the command and control server and then finally the instructions for the Denial-of-Service attack were received.

The history of various attacks has it that Moobot has been a part of quite a lot of attacks ever since it first surfaced last year. According to researchers, several threat actors have made use of it to exploit zero-day vulnerabilities. It was discovered by the researchers while it was manipulating a zero-day vulnerability in fiber routers, reports mention. It hence is needless to say that one of the major attack tactics of the Moobot is exploiting any zero-day flaw it could get it claws into.

There are numerous ways in which an organization can create a barricade against any such attacks. The cyber and technological security personnel could design a response plan and a contingency plan especially against DDoS attacks, the systems should be backed up at all times, and configuration could be done in a way that as soon as the network is attacked the back-up kicks in. Also, researchers suggest that Artificial Intelligence could prove to be a very lucrative solution for such problems.

Three Botnets Abuse Zero-Day Vulnerabilities in LILIN's DVRs!


Not of late, LILIN recorders were found to be vulnerable. Reportedly, botnet operators were behind the zero-day vulnerabilities that were exploited in the Digital Video Recorders (DVRs ) that the vendor is well known for.

Sources mention that the exploitation of the zero-day vulnerabilities had been a continuous thing for almost half a year and the vendor was unaware. Nevertheless, they rolled out a patch in February 2020.

Digital Video Recorders are electronic devices that collect video feeds from local CCTV/IP cameras systems and store them on different mass storage devices like SD cards, USB flash drives, disk drives, etc.

DVRs are a huge deal today given they are a major element for the security cameras that are used almost everywhere in these times.

With CCTV cameras raging, attacks especially designed for them have also risen equally. Malware botnets and other hacker operations have been targeting these widely used DVRs for quite some time now.

Per sources, the non-revised and out of date firmware stands to be the reason for these devices being hacked. Especially, the DVRs with default credentials are exploited to kick off DDoS and other IoT attacks.
Sources mention that security researchers found LILIN’s DVRs too were being exploited for almost half a year, since August last year by three botnets.


The vulnerability in the “NTPUpdate”, sources mention, allows attackers to inject and control the system’s commands. Via one of the ‘hardcoded credentials’ (root/icatch99 & report/8Jg0SR8K50) the attacker stands a chance to retrieve and alter a DVR’s config file, and later control commands on the device after the File Transfer Protocol (FTP) server configuration is regularly matched.

Per sources, the first botnet behind the zero-day vulnerability was the “Chalubo botnet” with a motive of exploiting the NTPUdate of the LILIN DVRs. The other two were employed by the “FBot botnet”

Reportedly, a couple of weeks after the previous attacks of the FBot, the Moobot botnet also tried its luck and succeeded on the second zero-day vulnerability.

There is no knowing as to what the exact motive was behind hacking the LILIN DVRs. Nevertheless, there has been a history of DDoS attacks, re-routing traffic, and proxy networks.

As it happens there are, per sources, over 5,000 LILIN DVRs that exist today thus making it quite a hefty task to update all of them immediately. But it’s a relief to know that the first step has been taken. There’s not much to worry about now given LILIN has released a firmware update along with solutions for mitigation.