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Showing posts with label Users' Credential. Show all posts

RockYou2021: The Largest Data Leak with 8.4 Billion Passwords

 

According to Cybernews, what appears to be the world's largest password collection, called RockYou 2021, has been leaked on a famous hacker site. A forum user uploaded a 100GB TXT file containing 8.4 billion password entries. 

All of the passwords in the leak, according to the author, are 6-20 characters long, with non-ASCII characters and white spaces eliminated. According to the same individual, the collection has 82 billion passwords. However, Cybernews discovered that the actual figure was roughly ten times lower, at 8,459,060,239 entries, after conducting its own testing. 

The forum member has named the compilation ‘RockYou2021,' probably in allusion to the historic RockYou data breach that occurred in 2009 when threat actors hacked into the social app website's servers and obtained over 32 million user passwords stored in plain text. 

This leak is equivalent to the Compilation of Many Breaches (COMB), the greatest data breach compilation ever, with a collection that exceeds its 12-year-old namesake by more than 262 times. The RockYou2021 compilation, which has been accumulated by the individual behind the compilation over several years, contains its 3.2 billion hacked credentials, as well as credentials from numerous other hacked databases. Given that only roughly 4.7 billion people are online, the RockYou2021 compilation might theoretically contain the passwords of the entire global online population almost two times over. 

“By combining 8.4 billion unique password variations with other breach compilations that include usernames and email addresses, threat actors can use the RockYou2021 collection to mount password dictionary and password spraying attacks against untold numbers of online accounts,” CyberNews notes.

“Since most people reuse their passwords across multiple apps and websites, the number of accounts affected by credential stuffing and password spraying attacks in the wake of this leak can potentially reach millions, if you feel one or more of your passwords may have been exposed as a result of the RockYou2021 incident, you should change your passwords for all of your online accounts right away. A password manager, according to Cybernews, can help you build strong, complex passwords that aren't easy to remember. You may also set up two-factor authentication (2FA) across all of your accounts. Finally, as always, carefully check all unsolicited spam emails, phone calls, and text messages for signs of phishing.

Virtual Wallet Users are Being Scammed

 

People are carrying less cash as technology advances, preferring to use debit cards, credit cards, and smartphone payment apps instead. Although using virtual wallets like Venmo, PayPal, and Cash App is easy and becoming more common, there is a risk of being scammed by someone who does not appear to be who they claim to be. Virtual wallets are applications that you can download on your Android or iPhone to make it simple to send and receive money from friends, relatives, and other people. To move money, these apps are connected to a bank account. 

Scammers are always on the lookout for their next victim, and these apps provide them with an ideal opportunity to defraud people of their hard-earned money. Fraudsters have devised a number of strategies for intercepting payments or convincing app users to pay them directly. 

Last year, the Better Business Bureau reported on a new scheme in which con artists send messages requesting the return of unintended payments after making deposits into their victims' accounts. 

When the victim checks their account and discovers these transfers, which were made with stolen credit cards, they refund the funds, by which point the scammer has replaced the stolen credit card credentials with their own. The money is then sent to the fraudster, and the victim is held responsible until the owner of the stolen card files restitution claims. 

In contrast to Cash App and Venmo, PayPal is the oldest form of virtual wallet. In a PayPal scam, the scammer asks a seller to send the things he or she "bought" to a particular address. They discover that the address is invalid after the scammer "pays" for the item and the seller sends the package, but it's too late. 

If the shipping company is unable to locate the address, the item will be marked as undeliverable. The scammer would then contact the shipping company and provide a new address in order to accept the package while claiming they did not receive it. 

The scammer would then collect the item and file a complaint with PayPal claiming that the item was never delivered. PayPal will refund the money charged to the scammer because the buyer has no evidence that the item was shipped. As a result, the seller loses both money and goods to the con artist. 

App developers should take action to protect their users from these types of scams. Multifactor authentication and secondary confirmation, such as emailed security codes, are examples of these safeguards. According to Microsoft research, multifactor authentication will prevent 99.9% of fraud attempts involving compromised login credentials.

GitHub Announced Security Key Support for SSH Git Operations

 

When using Git over SSH, GitHub, the ubiquitous host for software creation and version control (and unfortunate victim of a relentless stream of attacks targeting the same), now supports encryption keys.

GitHub security engineer Kevin Jones said in a blog post on Monday that this is the next step in improving security and usability. These portable FIDO2 fobs are used for SSH authentication to protect Git operations and avoid the havoc that can occur when private keys are misplaced or stolen, or when malware attempts to execute requests without user permission. For instance, in 2019, the TrickBot data-stealing malware was updated to include a password grabber that could attack data from OpenSSH applications. 

These security keys, which include the YubiKey, Thetis Fido U2F Security Key, and Google Titan Security Keys, are easy to carry around in your pocket and attach to computers via USB, NFC, or Bluetooth. They can be used instead of one-time passwords generated by apps or sent via SMS. SMS SSH codes sent via text can currently be intercepted.

Strong passwords are still relevant, but because of the proliferation of data breaches and cyberattacks, they are becoming less useful as a single security mechanism, prompting the development of password managers that often check for credential leakage online, biometrics, and security keys. 

"We recognize that passwords are convenient, but they are a consistent source of account security challenges," Jones commented. "We believe passwords represent the present and past, but not the future. By removing password support for Git, as we already successfully did for our API, we will raise the baseline security hygiene for every user and organization, and for the resulting software supply chain." 

Since keys are one of the variables in multi-factor authentication (MFA), users can treat them with the same care as any other credential. You should have your security key plugged in if you're the only one that has access to it. “When using SSH with a security key, none of the sensitive information ever leaves the physical security key device,” Jones added. “If you’re the only person with physical access to your security key, it’s safe to leave plugged in at all times.” 

When you use a security key, neither ransomware nor unintended private-key leakage will reveal your keys, he said: “As long as you retain access to the security key, you can be confident that it can’t be used by anyone else for any other purpose.”

Microsoft Lures Populate Half of Credential-Swiping Phishing Emails

 



According to the sources nearly half of the emails, phishing attacks in the year 2020 aimed to swipe credentials using Microsoft-related lures – from the Office 365 enterprise service lineup to its Teams collaboration platform. 

As per the Tuesday report by Cofense, which has studied the numbers of emails related attacks including 57 percent of attacks which were phishing emails targeting victims’ sensitive credential information such as usernames and passwords. Additionally, 45 percent of those phishing emails were Microsoft-themed, according to the researchers: threat actors are using both methods for their targets including Microsoft-themed lures for their emails, along with, ensuing phishing landing pages that will either leverage or spoof legitimate Microsoft domains or services. 

“With the number of organizations migrating to Office 365, targeting these credentials allows the threat actor to gain access to the organization as a legitimate user to go undetected,” researchers with Cofense told the press. They added that they “highly recommend organizations enable [multi-factor authentication] along with their [Office 365] migration/ implementation.” 

Malicious actors email trap can vary; sometimes it could display straightforward “‘Joe wants to share a document with you’ SharePoint alert you would normally see from Microsoft,” researchers explained — or it could attach a file with documents that will include a link to a website asking users to login with Microsoft credentials. 

In October, a phishing campaign was reported which appeared to be an automated message from the team of Microsoft telling users that they had a missed Teams chat but in reality, it was a trap, attacking Office 365 recipients’ login credentials. 

Another attack with a different patter had occurred in December which employed embedded URLs that redirect to the fake, never-seen-before Microsoft Office 365 phishing pages. For instance, the attack displayed emails that were impersonating businesses like eFax (which allows consumers to receive faxes via email or online with help of internet service.) 

“We also see [cybercriminals] giving the user options to choose from the most commonly used email platforms. The phishing emails often contain URLs hosted on legitimate domains that maintain a broad consumer base to avoid being blocked by content rules and filters.” said, researchers. 

“Other popular brands we observed asking for credentials were other various cloud hosting services such as Adobe, Dropbox, Box, DocuSign or WeTransfer,” researchers told the press. “Threat actors have been able to scour the internet looking for file-sharing websites that are deemed ‘business related’ in order to make it past the secure email gateway controls, as well as the web proxy filters.”