Ukraine to introduce electronic elections following the example of Estonia


The team of the Ukranian president Vladimir Zelensky promised to hold the next presidential elections in Ukraine using Estonia's experience in electronic technologies.

Mikhail Fedorov, advisor to the President of Ukraine on the development of digital technologies, assured that Ukrainians will be able to vote online using the Vote system during the next presidential election as early as 2024.

"We already have The Vote project. It will be surveys at the first stage, through which the President, Prime Minister and others will find out the real opinion of the inhabitants of the country," Fedorov said.

Currently, only one country in the world uses the online voting system in parliamentary elections, it is Estonia. There, the voter is identified using a chip ID card or MobileID, and a PIN code is required to enter the system.

The authorities of Ukraine are going to supplement these opportunities with identification using an electronic signature, Mobile ID and maybe Smart ID for phones. In addition, it is possible to change your choice and vote, as well as check whether the vote is counted correctly when counting votes in the Central Election Commission.

It is known that the widespread introduction of electronic technologies has become a kind of visiting card of Estonia and its know-how in the eyes of the world community.

At the same time, many experts note that the use of the Internet in the elections of authorities is quite controversial because of security problems.

Recall that on July 30, the President of Ukraine Vladimir Zelensky signed a decree on measures to improve access to electronic services in the country. This document introduces a unified web portal of electronic services, where Ukrainians will be able to access information about themselves in the state registers using an electronic cabinet. The decree also approves the conduct of electronic elections and electronic census of the population in Ukraine.


The Dark Side of Kremlin- The Catalogue of Russian Data Leaks: All You Need To Know




Thousands of Russian emails and documents were leaked online in the late January in a catalogue named “The Dark Side of Kremlin”.


The catalogue was published by a “transparency collective” which goes by the name of “Distributed Denial of Secrets”.

DDoS encompasses an anonymous group of journalists, researchers, tech-experts and activists.

The documents contained private information regarding all the major hot-shots of Russia including the politicians, religious figures and the military.

The DDoS say, that their only job is to provide information to those who need it. If the information strengthens suspicions it hardly matters.

They also mentioned that their collection of data including emails, chat logs and attachments were hacked a few years ago by several hacking groups in Russia and Ukraine.

The Cyber Junta, Russian hackers Shaltai-Boltai, Ukrainian Cyber Alliance and other international parties were among the few accused.

The information leaked includes private documents and emails from the Ministry of Defense, the Russian Presidential Administration and other high-level political operatives.

Russia’s Prime Minister Dimitry Medvedev’s phone was hacked and his holiday pictures were uploaded online.

Russian President’s chef who controls companies that cater fancy banquets in Kremlin also lost his private notes to the leak.

The leak also includes the elaborate personal notes made by the chef on conversations between Putin and European leaders from Italy and Britain.

The most revealing hacks were the ones that came from the Russian Presidential Administration, which fairly let the Russian government, be a little more “transparent”.

The leak had details on how the government controls the Russian media and the way it transmits messages etc.

The most concerning part is that no one knows for sure how much and what kinds of information have been laid out bare in the open.

The leaks also provide an insight about the relations between Ukraine and Russia.

The inner-doings of Russia’s proxies and other insidious groups have also been brought into the light.

The DDoS had experienced a wipe on their servers making it imperative for them to upload it soon, in order to prevent the data from being censored.

Reportedly, this leak can’t be considered as a revenge for anything that has happened before, it was just an attempt at transparency.

A lot of the information present in the leaks was already available on the web but a lot of new investigations have been given birth due to this massive leakage.

This Russian document leak has created a paradigm shift in the way countries take their cyber-security seriously.

Analyzing these leaks could possibly lead Russia to adopting a new way of securing the web and its Presidential administration.

The government has already started taking care of its cyber-security vigilantly and all the loop holes will soon be filled up.

NotPetya; a Significantly Greater Danger than Wannacry Malware




With the rising conflict amongst Ukraine and Russia that prompted the killings of more than 10,000 Ukrainians and affected millions more , the Russian hackers, in June 2017 came up with  the most pulverizing cyber security breaches to attack systems of the victims through an encrypted code that ranged from media outlets to railway firms.

Andy Greenberg, author of Sandworm and a senior writer with the WIRED chronicled the birth of this biggest cyber attack , in an excerpt from his book he says,

”For the past four and a half years, Ukraine has been locked in a grinding, undeclared war with Russia that has ultimately led to Ukraine becoming a scorched-earth testing ground for the Russian cyber war tactics. In 2015 and 2016, while the Kremlin-linked hackers known as Fancy Bear were busy breaking into the US Democratic National Committee’s servers, another group of agents known as Sandworm was hacking into dozens of Ukrainian governmental organisations and companies. They successfully managed to penetrate the networks of victims ranging from media outlets to railway firms, detonating logic bombs that destroyed terabytes of data.”

This thought of obliteration brought forth NotPetya, a significantly greater danger to the world than the scandalous Wannacry malware.

Petya is amongst the family of those encrypting ransomware that was first discovered in 2016. It goes for focusing only on Microsoft Windows-based frameworks, infecting the master boot record in the process to execute a payload that encodes a hard drive's file system table thus keeping Windows from booting. At the same time consequently demanding from the user to make a payment in Bitcoin with a specific end goal to recapture access to the system.

NotPetya is simply one more form originating from Petya as both plan to encode the hard drive of infected computers, there exists enough common features between the two.

Now in spite of the fact that NotPetya was focusing on war-ridden Ukraine, the result was felt by the world. The malware could destruct computers, data and wired machines over the world.

In an excerpt from Sandworm published by WIRED, the writer describes how the spread of the malware influenced not simply its expected casualty, i.e. Ukraine, but also machineries all around the world.

The after-effect of this attack was more than $10 billion in aggregation says the Former Homeland Security advisor Tom Bossert, who amid the investigation and analysis of the malware was US President Donald Trump's most senior cyber security-¬focused official. Indeed, even the scandalous WannaCry, that spread a month before NotPetya in May 2017, is assessed to have taken a toll between $4 billion and $8 billion.

Inevitably the attack, which had begun as an impetus to win the war against Ukraine, unequivocally focusing on a few hardware and computers in lodgings, hospitals, government workplaces and many places of importance in the nation, spread like wildfire, wreaking havoc  and causing tremendous destruction across the world.

In any case, even after over a year, the uncouth demonstrations of the NotPetya malware has not been wiped out totally as a few experts assert that the malware still has the potential to emerge as sessions in various parts of the world or even reoccur taking a much bigger frame.
Since the ransomware is digging in for the long haul the admonition pretty much continues as before for the users i.e. not to click on some obscure connections, use of solid and one of a kind passwords, at the same time staying up with the latest reinforcement which requires keeping an up-to-date backup.