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Showing posts with label Tik Tok. Show all posts

Here's All you Need to Know About Instagram Reels; Launched Globally in Over 50 Countries


As TikTok fell prey to extensive criticism and was labeled as a 'threat to security' by governments, resulting in the banning of the popular video-sharing platform, the creators have long ago started weighing what's next!

In the wake of TikTok's future succumbing to uncertainties, Instagram has rolled out a new feature 'Reels', that appear to be in direct competition with what TikTok had to offer.

Starting today, Instagram is launching "Reels" feature for its users in more than 50 countries, it is seen as a remarkable and well-timed attempt by Instagram to capitalize upon the global turmoil in the creative sphere of social media. It's also a potential opportunity for Instagram to expand its identity from a photo app to a video entertainment platform.

With the expansion, now the feature will be available in major international markets including India, the U.S., the U.K., France, Brazil, Germany, Australia, Mexico, Spain, Argentina, Japan, and many others.

In a similar manner like TikTok, Instagram Reels will allow people to create mini-clips with music that they can share with their followers, these short-form videos will be discoverable while users browse the "Explore" tab on Instagram.

Reels let users record 15 seconds long video clips and add filters, effects, and popular music onto them, the feature is entirely embedded inside Instagram's original app and is not to be mistaken for being an add-on or a separate app. It is not a different world altogether like TikTok or Vine, but just 'yet another thing' one can do on Instagram.

While announcing the release of "Reels", the company said in a blog, "It's a new way to create and discover short, entertaining videos on Instagram."

"Reels invites you to create fun videos to share with your friends or anyone on Instagram. Record and edit 15-second multi-clip videos with audio, effects, and new creative tools. You can share reels with your followers on Feed, and, if you have a public account, make them available to the wider Instagram community through a new space in Explore. Reels in Explore offers anyone the chance to become a creator on Instagram and reach new audiences on a global stage."

How to Create Reels?


"Select Reels at the bottom of the Instagram camera. You'll see a variety of creative editing tools on the left side of your screen to help create your reel, including:"

"Audio: Search for a song from the Instagram music library. You can also use your own original audio by simply recording a reel with it. When you share a reel with original audio, your audio will be attributed to you, and if you have a public account, people can create reels with your audio by selecting “Use Audio” from your reel.

AR Effects: Select one of the many effects in our effect gallery, created both by Instagram and creators all over the world, to record multiple clips with different effects.

Timer and Countdown: Set the timer to record any of your clips hands-free. Once you press record, you’ll see a 3-2-1 countdown, before recording begins for the amount of time you selected.

Align: Line up objects from your previous clip before recording your next to help create seamless transitions for moments like outfit changes or adding new friends into your reel.

Speed: Choose to speed up or slow down part of the video or audio you selected. This can help you stay on a beat or make slow-motion videos." Instagram explained in the blog.

Australia: TikTok Undergoing Scrutiny Over Data Security Concerns


Chinese video-sharing social networking platform, TikTok is undergoing scrutinization in Australia over data security and privacy concerns, according to the government sources. 

TikTok is a free app where users can post a minute long videos of short dances, lip-sync, and comedy using a multitude of creative tools at their disposal. The platform differs from other social media platforms in ways where it allows navigation through videos by scrolling up and down instead of usual tapping or swiping. 

Recently, the Bytedance owned, TikTok became a hot topic of discussion in both the offices of Home Affairs as well as Attorney-General; reportedly, the issue of privacy concerns drew more attention in the wake of the video-sharing giant opening an office in Australia. 

Lately, the platform had been making headlines for 'national security concerns'  which was one of the major reasons for Prime Minister Scott Morrison to examine TikTok, he stated that if there will be a need to take more actions than what the government had already been taking, then they won't be shy about it. 

Meanwhile, the inquiries carried out by Labor Senator Jenny McAllister put forth a need to scrutinize the app further, given a total of 1.6 million Australians were on TikTok. 

In conversation with ABC radio, she told, "Some of these approaches to moderating content might be inconsistent with Australian values," 

"For example, removing material about Tiananmen Square, or deprioritizing material about Hong Kong protests," she added. 

In a letter to Australian politicians, Lee Hunter,  general manager for TikTok Australia said, it's "critical you understand that we are independent and not aligned with any government, political party or ideology."

Clause Addition to the IT Act; Social Media Companies Now Responsible For All Nonuser Generated Content


A change brought in line with the changes in the US and Europe, the Indian government has recently added a clause to the proposed IT intermediary guidelines, making social media companies responsible for all nonuser produced content including supported content, distributed on their platforms. 

The change is expected to impact some extremely popular social media platforms, like Twitter, TikTok, YouTube, Instagram as well as Facebook. 

When the amended guidelines are made public, social media organizations will be required to accordingly and appropriately tag and identify all sponsored content published on their platforms and alongside it, draft standards, which are 'under consideration' of the law ministry, are expected to be notified in about a few weeks according to a senior government official “We have had a few rounds of discussions with the law ministry. 

These guidelines should be notified by February-end, the start of March.” Section 79-II of the Information Technology Act, 2000, right now absolves online intermediaries from obligation for any third party substance shared on their platform. In any case, with the new clause, the Act will give "safe harbor protection" to intermediaries, inasmuch as they just assume the job of a facilitator and not maker or modifier, in any way of the content posted.


What expedited the change was an issue that occurred in the previous year a disagreement regarding content between social media platform TikTok and Twitter-sponsored ShareChat where the latter had to bring down more than 100 videos from its platform. 

Right now, platforms like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram have certain features and tags through which ads and paid partnerships are displayed. Yet, publicists and advertisers state brands would rather push content through influencers to make it look increasingly organic. 

There is likewise no compulsion or onus on the influencers to highlight that the products and content they are supporting are paid for. 

However, Government authorities said such content, produced by influencers without the contribution of the social media platforms, may in any case not be secured by the most recent clause. This clause will relate to just such non-user produced content in which the platform is in some way involved.

This meme explains why TikTok isn't like any other social media



People think that TikTok is a black hole where teens jump in and memes pop out. To be sure, TikTok has both teens and memes. But the reality is much more structured than it seems.

TikTok is dominated by videos with a very rigid, formulaic structure: a song, a dance. “You Need to Calm Down” by Taylor Swift plays, and the person sets up a social scenario that ends with them lip-synching “You need to calm down, you’re being too loud.”

Most of TikTok is like Mad Libs: the specifics of the joke differ, but the punchline is always the same. At any given moment, there’s maybe five to ten sound bites—which could be songs, or original audio recorded by users—that are accumulating the majority of the views, sometimes hundreds of thousands in just hours.

Enter TikTok's latest genre: point-of-view videos, or POVs. They create scenarios that range from horror, to historical fiction, to teenage fantasies, to the completely absurd. These videos often have little in common aside from the significant role that they assign to the viewer.

The traditional TikTok POV is shot from a first-person perspective, making the viewers the main character of the video. TikToker @porrinate, who identified himself as Adam, told Motherboard, “I think it makes it very personal to the viewer, because the video is through their eyes.”

Adam made a POV captioned “#pov you dont have a lunch at school and i offer you my entire lunch because i want you to be okay.” In this video, the viewer is a student that doesn’t have lunch. Adam speaks directly to them.

“I took it from my own experience, which was like, I didn’t get to eat that much in high school—and if I did, it was from somebody else,” Adam said. “So I would always feel like, people need to be more generous, especially towards those who are really struggling.”

Madras high court lifts ban on Tik Tok but you still can’t download it

The Madurai Bench of the Madras High Court removed the interim ban on TikTok on April 24, three weeks after it had asked the government to prohibit further downloads of the popular Chinese short-video application.

TikTok allows users to create and share short videos with special effects and is one of the world’s most popular apps.

On April 3, the app was prohibited in the country because of concern it exposed children to pornography and other disturbing content.

The Chinese parent company had appealed to the apex court against the high court's order. Beijing Bytedance Technology Co. said ban led to financial losses of up to US$500,000 a day and had put more than 250 jobs at risk.

Amicus Curiae Arvind Datar, appointed by the court to examine the implications of the app, argued on Wednesday that banning an application is not the solution, and rights of legitimate users must be protected.

The Supreme Court had on Monday asked the Madras High Court to decide in its hearing on Wednesday ByteDance’s plea against the latter’s interim order of banning the app.

Last week, Google and Apple removed TikTok from their app stores on the directions of the government. The app, however, is still not available for download on both Android and iOS devices. Even if you try to install it via Google Chrome from a computer, the app listing page shows an error. A report by Gadgets 360 suggests that Madras High Court has still not sent the directive officially to the Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology. This is the reason the government hasn't been able to ask Google and Apple to make the apps available officially on their app stores.

While the reason for the delay is still unknown, those who are interested in downloading the app will still have to rely on third-party websites for downloading it on Android phones. Do note that the case is still ongoing and it could be a while before the court sends the directive to the government to remove the ban on the app.