Hackers used ASUS Software Updates to Install malware on thousands of computers





Researchers at cybersecurity firm Kaspersky Lab found out that recent Asus’ software update system was hacked and used to distribute malware to millions of its customers.

The malware was masked as a  “critical” software update, which was distributed from the Asus’ servers. The malicious malware file was signed with legitimate ASUS digital certificates that made it look an authentic software update from the company, Kaspersky Lab says.

 The report of the hack was first reported by Motherboard, and Kaspersky Lab plans to release more details as soon as possible at an upcoming conference.

The intentions of hackers behind doing this is not clear. However, from the early investigation, it is reported that the hackers seem to target a bunch of specific Asus customers as it contains special instructions for 600 systems, which is identified by specific MAC addresses.

Till now, Asus has not contacted any of its affected customers or taken any step to stop the malware. In an email interview with the Verge, Asus said that they would issue an official statement on the malware tomorrow afternoon.

According to the Motherboard, Asus apparently denied that the malware had come from its servers.

“This attack shows that the trust model we are using based on known vendor names and validation of digital signatures cannot guarantee that you are safe from malware,” said Vitaly Kamluk, Asia-Pacific director of Kaspersky Lab’s Global Research and Analysis Team who led the research.




Pilots still waiting for Software Update of Boeing, which was promised last year






After a deadly crash of the Lion Air 737 MAX 8 in Indonesia in last October, company officials have met pilot union, and said that they are planning to the software for their 737 Max jets, but till now there has not been a single update.

Meanwhile, addressing the issue, the United States regulators said the software update would be ready by April.

“Boeing was going to have a software fix in the next five to six weeks,” said Michael, the top safety official at the American Airlines pilots union. “We told them, ‘Yeah, it can’t drag out.’ And well, here we are.”

The planned software update would let pilots to detect the problem, and will them from recurrence of the same problem.  Boeing officials  believe that pilots doesn't need any special training in order to learn the functioning of the software update, but they just need a small briefing on how the software fix would function.