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Commercial Third Party Code Sources Pose Security Risks

 

Despite the fact that the use of third-party code in IoT projects has increased by 17 percent in the last five years, according to VDC Research, only 56 percent of OEMs have structured security testing policies. Meanwhile, 73.6 percent of respondents said protection was essential, very important, or critical to current projects when asked how important, very important, or critical it was. 

For years, the rate of required innovation outpaced the rate of resource growth within production and quality assurance organizations, making it difficult to keep up organically. With organizations no longer able to focus their code development strategy on custom code, using content from other sources has become more important. 

Because of the possible consequences for corporate harm, liability, and brand reputation loss, protection has become a pervasive and paramount concern in the software supply chain. 

“With more complex software supply chains becoming the norm, organizations are leaning on these third party assets to accelerate their internal software development, which creates security blind spots,” said Chris Rommel, EVP, IoT & Industrial Technology for VDC Research. “With standards such as IEC 62443 requiring increased security of IoT devices, new testing capabilities are needed to address these software creation changes to ensure code quality and minimize risk.” 

GrammaTech, a provider of application security testing tools, launched a new approach in 2020 aimed at exposing vulnerabilities in third-party code used in the production of custom applications. It was called CodeSentry, and it used binary software composition analysis (SCA) to create the code and find any bugs it might have. 

"Using third-party components, rather than building applications from scratch, is an accepted practice for accelerating time to market, and is fueling a massive growth in reusable code," said Mike Dager, CEO of GrammaTech, in a statement. "Most organizations now recognize the security risks that third-party code poses to their applications and business, and the need for software composition analysis provided by CodeSentry, which inspects binaries for unmatched precision."

“Commercial third party code, which is the fastest-growing component software within the IoT market, can contain both proprietary and open source components,” said Andy Meyer, CMO for GrammaTech.

Research Shows 19 Petabytes of Data Exposed Across 29,000+ Unprotected Databases

 

Researchers from CyberNews discovered that over 29,000 databases across the world are now totally inaccessible and publicly available, exposing over 19,000 terabytes of data to everyone, including threat actors. 

The majority of businesses keep confidential data in databases. Passwords, usernames, document scans, health records, bank account, and credit card information, and other vital information are all easily searchable and stored in one location. 

To steal all that valuable data, attackers don't always need to hack them: one of the most common causes of a breach is databases that have been left unsecured, allowing anyone to access the data without a username or password. Hundreds of millions of people's personal information can (and often does) become exposed on the internet as a result of database security flaws, allowing threat actors to exploit that data for a variety of malicious purposes, including phishing and other forms of social engineering attacks, as well as identity theft. 

According to CyberNews, hundreds of thousands of database servers are still open to everyone, with more than 29,000 insecure databases exposing nearly 19 petabytes of data to hacking, tampering, deletion, and other threats. The fact that tens of thousands of open databases have data exposed is nothing new. Indeed, cybercriminals are so aware of this that a vulnerable database can be identified and targeted by threat actors in only a few hours. 

After years of huge data breaches, ransom requests, and even crippling data wipeouts by feline hackers (meow), one would think database owners would be aware of the issue and, at the very least, ask for a username and password before letting someone in. 

To conduct the investigation, CyberNews used a specialized search engine to look for open databases for Hadoop, MongoDB, and Elasticsearch, three of the most common database types. As a result, the true number of unprotected databases and the volume of data exposed is undoubtedly much higher than they discovered. 

According to the results found, there are at least 29,219 vulnerable Elasticsearch, Hadoop, and MongoDB databases are let out in the open. Hadoop clusters outnumber the competition in terms of exposed data, with nearly 19 petabytes available to threat actors who could put millions, if not billions, of users at risk with a single click. 

Elasticsearch leads the pack in terms of exposed databases, with 19,814 instances without any kind of authentication, placing more than 14 terabytes of data at risk of being hacked or held hostage by ransomware gangs. MongoDB appears to do much better than others in terms of terabytes, but the 8,946 unprotected instances demonstrate that thousands of organizations and individuals who use MongoDB to store and handle their data still have a long way to go in terms of basic database security. 

Unknown cyber criminals conducted a series of so-called "Meow" attacks in 2020, wiping all data from thousands of unsecured databases without explanation or even a ransom demand, leaving shocked owners with nothing but an empty folder and files labeled "meow" as the attacker's signature. It was found that 59 databases hit by the ‘Meow’ attacks a year ago are still unprotected and collectively leaving 12.5GB of data exposed. 

According to CyberNews security researcher Mantas Sasnauskas, this only goes to show that raising awareness about exposed and publicly accessible databases is as important as ever. “Anyone can look for these unprotected clusters by using IoT search engines to effortlessly identify those that don’t have authentication enabled and exploit them by stealing the data, holding them ransom, or, as was the case with the ‘Meow’ attack, simply destroy valuable information for fun, wiping billions of records and crippling both business and personal projects in the process.”

Databases are used by businesses of all sizes to store customer and employee records, financial details, and other confidential information. Databases are often operated by administrators who lack security training, making them an easy target for malicious actors. 

The owner of a database can take certain steps to protect the database from unwanted visitors like:
1.Authentication should be activated so that no one can access your database without the correct credentials or ssh key. 
2.One must not use the default password – threat actors scour the internet for publicly available databases with default passwords allowed and target them on the spot.
3.Maintain the latest version of your database program.

Siemens USA Announced the Launch of Its Technologically Advanced Cyber Test Range

 

As the Coronavirus pandemic prompted an expansion in cyberattacks, this called for the need for certain facilities that would explicitly focus on prevention, discovery, and response solutions. For a similar reason, Siemens USA came up with the launch of its innovatively progressed cyber test go housed at its U.S. R&D headquarters in Princeton, New Jersey. 

The Siemens cyber test range was intended to test developing cybersecurity innovations against real-world situations to help distinguish and moderate potential weaknesses. 

The cyber range has embarked to turn into a hub where data scientists, security experts, and others can come together to perform inventive researches in the field of cybersecurity and prototype and approve new research ideas. 

Siemens' growing collection of operational innovation hardware and software components makes the range more valuable for 'a variety of industrially focused security research'.

The design of the facility was done keeping in mind the adaptability, permitting remote operation and range segments to be moved to different areas like gatherings, colleges, government research labs, and even customer environments. 

Siemens has partnered together with the Atlantic Council to utilize this cyber range to upgrade students' understanding during their 'Cyber 9/12 Strategy Challenge' arrangement through the re-enactment of cyberattacks on frameworks like advanced water treatment and power generation facilities. 

Today, Siemens and its products are upheld by a global association with more than 1,200 digital specialists. The organization's products and solutions have modern security functions that are inherent by design and empowered by default. 

Kurt John, Siemens USA's Chief Cybersecurity Office says “Cybersecurity is at the center of everything we do at Siemens. This cyber range will help Siemens continue to innovate in the field of critical infrastructure cybersecurity and build industry confidence in the secure digitalization of America’s operational technology. With this cyber range, our customers and partners can now join us on our ongoing journey to help mitigate cyberattacks and protect America’s critical infrastructure.” 

This cyber range will undoubtedly be another space for future pioneers to fabricate trust in associated foundation to shape an economical and a strong future and simultaneously for Siemens to ace the innovation foundational to a Fourth Industrial Revolution.