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Ukrainian cyber police exposed a fraudulent scheme of financial auctions


Earlier EhackingNews reported that cyber police in the Kharkiv region exposed members of a criminal hacker group who purposefully carried out attacks on private organizations and individuals to illegally gain access to their remote servers. It is established that in this way they managed to hack more than 20 thousand servers around the world.

It turned out that in fact, the cyber police exposed a fraudulent scheme of financial auctions with a monthly turnover of $100 thousand.

According to cyber police, the attackers opened in Kiev several call centers to conduct trading on the world financial markets. They offered their victims to invest money, which in the future, according to them, can bring high profits. Otherwise, they promised to return the invested money.

Scammers created an imitation of trading, appropriating money for themselves. When the client tried to withdraw money, the attackers carried out a number of operations that led to the complete loss of money by the client.

All invested money was credited to the offshore accounts of the attackers. In the end, the income amounted to more than 100 thousand US dollars monthly. The attackers worked on the territory of Ukraine and the European Union. Cyber police identify all victims.

Law enforcement officers raided the offices of fraudsters and seized system units, servers, and mobile phones. During an inspection of this technique, it was found that the attackers also sold illegal drugs. Their sale was carried out in Ukraine and abroad via the Internet. Attackers face up to 12 years in prison and confiscation of property.

It is worth noting that fraud with Bank cards is gaining popularity in Ukraine. A fraudster who stole more than $42 thousand from his victims was detained last month. The man duplicated Bank cards of citizens. Imitating an ATM operation error, he used special manipulations to duplicate the card of the next user of the Bank.

Military Personnel and Veterans - faced the worst hit by scammers loosing 405 Million dollars since 2012



It's easy to trick anyone in a financial scam but hackers and scammers found their favorite victims in militants and veterans. According to a new report analyzed by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and Better Business Bureau, nearly one million militants and veterans in the US have been conned of 405 million dollars in different scams since 2012.



The Losses
The loss by Army personnel accounts for up to 142 million dollars, this loss by Army personnel records up to 64% of the total loss in scams since 2012. This was followed by a loss by the Navy, losing 62 million dollars. Meanwhile, loss by Airforce and Marine stands at $44,257,654 and $24,976,528 respectively. Veterans also suffered great losses, 60% of the total loss.

The worst-hit states

The state Virginia was the most impacted, with the highest number of reports recorded standing at a number of 70,047. Most of these were duped by a retailer who tricked army personnel and veterans into paying $5 for legal protection.

Some of the prominent scams

Bank and lender scams were the highest, with a loss of 111,709,530 dollars. The next one and among the most common scam that conned veterans were the fraudulent employment variety. Such scams were reported for over 270,000 since 2012. In these cases, scammers send emails to new veterans offering them jobs as civilians.

They claimed of having the job offer on popular boards like LinkedIn. After hiring, they asked the newly appointed individual to buy equipment from a website (operated by fraudsters). The veterans were assured that they will receive the amount for the equipment back but to no avail.
Other scams reported during the last seven years included identity theft, imposter scams, and advanced payment for credit services.

Cyber Criminals Use New Method To Steal Funds From Bank Customers' Account


According to a report of the Central Bank, this year, Bank fraudsters have a new way of stealing from Bank cards, they pose as Bank employees using the technology to substitute phone numbers. Special IP-telephony services allow them to perform substitution of numbers, or scammers disguise the number using the letters OOO instead of 000 and so on.

It is noted that the two tools help the scammers to commit thefts. The first is access to personal data. Only in the last six months, the Central Bank specialists found 13 thousand ads for buying or selling names and phone numbers. Attackers, who got personal data, can easily simulate a conversation as an employee of a credit institution, insurance company or government agency.

The second tool of scammers is special programs that allow them to disguise as the official number of the Bank. The Central Bank recognised the falsification of Bank numbers as a new massive way of stealing money from the population.

According to the Bank of Russia, this summer the number of fraudulent calls to customers increased dramatically, and in June-August, the regulator sent data to Telecom operators on more than 2.5 thousand numbers from which calls to customers of Banks were received. However, only 200 numbers were blocked.

Experts believe that blocking numbers is not the best way to combat fraud. It would be more correct to stop the leakage of personal data from Banks and other organizations.

Thefts are mostly associated with the substitution of phone numbers, and Telecom operators refer to the lack of norms in the law. We will initiate changes to the law on communications, - said Artem Sychev, the First Deputy Head of the Department of information security of the Central Bank.

Don’t change your birth year to 2007 to Twitter or you’ll be locked out

There are tons of hoaxes constantly doing the rounds on Twitter, including the recent Bitcoin scam. Today, I want to warn you about one that’s taken over the platform over the past couple of days: the “birth year hoax“.

It’s as simple as it is stupid: it encourages you to head into your settings and change your birth year to 2007, in order to unlock a colourful feed or a ‘retro’ theme across the site. Instead, users who fall for the scam will be locked out of their accounts because Twitter prohibits anyone under the age of 13 from using the site.

So, as soon as you change your birth year, Twitter thinks that you’re only 12 years old, and blocks your account.

Twitter has automatically prevented users under 13 from using the social network since May last year and its terms of use state that the social network is "not directed to children."

You were promised a new timeline of colour options. You ended up getting blocked from the social networking site.

Earlier this week, rumours were circulating that changing your birthyear would give you access to Twitter's nostalgic old appearance.

Twitter has warned users to ignore a hoax suggesting an alternative colour scheme will appear in the app if they change their birth year to 2007. Users won't get a new colour scheme on the Twitter app if they change their birth year, the social network says.

If you, like many people, were lured into changing your birth year on Twitter to 2007 to unlock new colour schemes, you fell victim to one of the social media's latest hoaxes.

"Please don't do this," the company said via a tweet.

If you’ve unfortunately fallen prey to this scam and are locked out of your account, follow the instructions in the email the company has sent you to regain access.

Thousands Of Users Thrashed By Extremely Real-looking-Fake-Scans Scam



Thousands of users have encountered a severe threat from scammers who are employing cunning use of JavaScript and HTML codes by way of “Potentially Unwanted Applications”.

A major security researching organization uncovered a recent development in the scamming area where PUAs and POAs are being employed.

These scams could be categorized as tech-support scams which primarily work on scaring the victim into doing something unforeseen by the victim themselves.

After fake-calls, potentially unwanted applications have become quite common, but the latest twist is the shrewd usage of JavaScript and HTML code.

These codes specifically work on making the fake scans seem implausibly real, making it faster and easier for the scanners to fool their prey.

The well-known Norton Security applications are basically being stolen from the aforementioned organization.

These scams are in no way comparable to the basic and obvious anti-virus scams that are run on a common basis.

The scammers make the scan look so legit that it never occurs to the victim to question it at all.

There sure is an alert which pops up. The users think of it to be as one from an anti-malware app, when it’s actually coming from a web browser.

The way the scanners go around is that they offer an infection to be paired up by way of a 10-second scan. This obviously lures the users in swiftly.

A web-based dashboard is being implemented by the scammers to manage and monitor all the scams that are happening.

Thousands of dollars have been wrested from the victims that too by using overtly basic, fake looking contrivances.

Last three months of 2018 had been really busy for Symantec, the aforementioned organization, as they’ve blocked PUA installations around 89 million times.

There are several points that have to be kept in mind, for instance, no pop up is capable of analyzing the hard drive and the real files on it.

No anti-malware supplication would ask the user to download a separate application for the update process.

The best way to get saved from this kind of threat is looking out for an alert that mentions the remaining days left in the so called “subscription”.

Scam Alert: Emails Citing You’ve Won A BMW M24oi







There is a fresh scam in the market. Beware of emails citing that you’ve won a BMW lottery and acquired a BMW 2 series M24oi in this holiday season. These scams as per usual are after your personal data and credentials.


What seems to be like a whole new scamming campaign is actually trying to lure users into believing that they have won a lottery and as the prize they have won a BMW 2 series M24oi.


According to a reputed source the e-mails could have phrases and sentences like, “Hurry claim the prize” or “Claim your car and check with your winning code.” The contents of the e-mail are as follows:-

“Your e-mail has been selected for a prize of a brand new 2018 BMW 2 Series M24oi xDrive and a cheque of $1,500,000.00 USD from the international balloting programs held in USA but the WINNING IS FOR EVERYBODY CONTACTED AS A WINNER IN ANY PART OF THE WORLD. Contact the claims agents with the code BMW:2541256004/25 and your Delivery Details (full name, address of delivery and mobile number) to claim your prize.
 Congratulations!!!!
This message has been scanned for viruses and dangerous content by MailScanner, and is believed to be clean.”


The moment the receiver falls into the trap by sending the attacker their information, the cyber-con behind the scam is quite likely to as for more information including social security numbers and other sort of confidential information.


Later, the harvested information would be used to operate an identity theft in order to attain access to the receiver’s financial as well as personal accounts.


The only way to save your own self from falling into the entrapment of such scams is to delete the e-mails as soon as they are received. Or you might end up paying heavily.


21-Year-Old Arrested For SIM Swapping Hack; Allegedly Steals $1 Million


U.S. broadsheet the New York Post announced Nov. 20 regarding some authorities in the United State, state of California who have arrested a 21-year old New Yorker for the supposed burglary of $1 million in crypto utilizing "SIM-swapping,"

SIM-swapping otherwise called a "port-out scam" includes the burglary of a mobile phone number with the end goal to capture online financial and social media accounts, empowered by the way that numerous organizations utilize computerized messages or telephone calls to deal with client validation.

The captured suspect, Nicholas Truglia, is accused for having focused on well off Silicon Valley officials in the Bay Area, and of effectively convincing telecoms support staff to port six exploited people's numbers to his an affirmed "crew" of accomplice attackers. Deputy DA Erin West, of Santa Clara Superior Court, told the Post that the ploy was "a new way of doing an old crime.”

“You’re sitting in your home, your phone is in front of you, and you suddenly become aware there is no service because the bad guy has taken control of your phone number,” West said.

With his capture on November 14, authorities were able to recover $300,000 in stolen reserves while the remaining assets remain untraced.

Trugila is currently being held at pending for extradition to Santa Clara, where he faces 21 felony counts related with an aggregate of six exploited people, authorities said. One of Truglia's supposed SIM-swapping victims, San Francisco-based Robert Ross, was purportedly robbed of $500,000 worth of crypto possessions on his Coinbase wallet "in a flash" on Oct. 26, and in the meantime a further $500,000 was taken from his Gemini account. West said the $1,000,000 was Ross' "life savings" and his two girls' college fund.

This rising predominance of SIM swap-related occurrences has therefore provoked a California-based law enforcement group to make it their "most noteworthy need." in excess of one prominent occasion, exploited people have acted to sue telecoms firms, for example, AT&T and T-Mobile for their help of the wrongdoing.

Truglia is since being held Manhattan Detaintion Complex pending extradition to Santa Clara in California. Formal charges identify with a seven-day "hacking spree" starting Oct. 8, particularly involving "grand theft, altering or damaging computer data with the intent to defraud and using personal information without authorization.”