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Russian-Based Online Platform Taken Down By the FBI


The Federal Bureau of Investigation as of late brought down the Russian-based online platform DEER.IO that said to have been facilitating different cybercrime products and services were being sold according to announcements by the Department of Justice.

The Russian-based cyber platform known as DEER.IO has for quite some time been facilitating many online shops where illicit products and services were being sold.

A little while back, there happened the arrest of Kirill Victorovich Firsov as revealed by authorities, he was the supposed main operator behind Deer.io, a Shopify-like stage that has been facilitating many online shops utilized for the sale of hacked accounts and stole user data. Convicts ware paying around $12/month to open their online store on the platform.

When the 'crooks' bought shop access through the DEER.IO platform, a computerized set-up wizard permitted the proprietor to upload the products and services offered through the shop and configure the payment procedure by means of cryptocurrency wallets.

Arrested at the John F. Kennedy Airport, in New York, on Walk 7, Firsov has been arrested for running the Deer.io platform since October 2013 and furthermore publicized the platform on other hacking forums.

“A Russian-based cyber platform known as DEER.IO was shut down by the FBI today, and its suspected administrator – alleged Russian hacker Kirill Victorovich Firsov – was arrested and charged with crimes related to the hacking of U.S. companies for customers’ personal information.” - the official statement distributed by the DoJ.

While Feds looked into around 250 DEER.IO stores utilized by hackers to offer for sales thousands of compromised accounts, including gamer accounts and PII documents containing user names, passwords, U.S. Social Security Numbers, dates of birth, and victim addresses.

A large portion of the casualties is in Europe and the US. The FBI agents effectively bought hacked information from certain stores facilitated on the Deer.io platform, offered data were authentic as indicated by the feds.

When asked to comment for the same FBI Special Agent in Charge Omer Meisel states, “Deer.io was the largest centralized platform, which promoted and facilitated the sale of compromised social media and financial accounts, personally identifiable information (PII) and hacked computers on the Internet. The seizure of this criminal website represents a significant step in reducing stolen data used to victimize individuals and businesses in the United States and abroad.”

Roskomnadzor blocked the email service Protonmail


The FSB of the Russian Federation reported that it was possible to install another email service that was used by an "electronic terrorist" to send messages about mining of objects with a massive stay of people in Russia. On Wednesday, the FSB and the Federal Service for Supervision of Communications, Information Technology and Mass Media (Roskomnadzor) announced the blocking of the Swiss postal service Protonmail.com.

"This email service was used by hackers both in 2019 and especially actively in January 2020 to send false messages about mass mining of objects on the territory of the Russian Federation under the guise of reliable information," said the representative of Roskomnadzor.

In turn, the FSB of Russia reported that this service is used starting from January 24. Messages with threats of mining were sent to the email addresses of courts in four regions of the Russian Federation. Last year, the same service was also used to send false terrorist threats, but on a smaller scale.
"The texts also indicated allegedly mined 830 social and transport infrastructure objects. All threats were false," the FSB reported.

ProtonMail CEO Andy Yen recently announced his decision to go to court because he believes the block is unfounded. According to him, blocking the service is an inefficient and inappropriate tool to combat cyber attacks.

"This will not stop cybercriminals from sending threats from another email service and will not help if the criminals are located outside of Russia. Cybercriminals are also likely to be able to bypass the block using one of their many VPN services," Ian said.

The head of the company stressed that blocking mail will only harm private users and restrict access to private information for Russians.

Recall that this is the third foreign mail service blocked by Roskomnadzor for spreading false messages about mining facilities in Russia. On January 23, Roskomnadzor announced the blocking of the StartMail service. It was noted that mass mailings of messages about the mining of various objects on the territory of Russia were carried out through this mail service. Emails have been received since November 28, 2019.

US Senator Chuck Schumer urges FBI to investigate FaceApp




Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer has suggested for an investigation into FaceApp, citing its privacy concern and fear over data transfer to the Russian government.

In a letter posted on Twitter, Mr. Schumer called the FBI and Federal Trade Commission to investigate the popular app. 

"I have serious concerns regarding both the protection of the data that is being aggregated as well as whether users are aware of who may have access to it," his letter to FBI Director Christopher Wray and FTC Chairman Joseph Simons.

‘’Furthermore, it is unclear how long FaceApp retains a user’s data or how a user may ensure their data is deleted after usage. These forms of “dark patterns,” which manifest in opaque disclosures and broader user authorizations, can be misleading to consumers and may even constitute a deceptive trade practice.’’

‘’In particular, FaceApp’s location in Russia raises questions regarding how and when the company provides access to the data of U.S. citizens to third parties, including potentially foreign governments,’’ the letter reads.

However, the app makers have previously denied the allegations. 

In the meantime, the Democratic National Committee has reportedly warned all its 2020 presidential candidates and their campaigners not to use the app. 

"It's not clear at this point what the privacy risks are, but what is clear is that the benefits of avoiding the app outweigh the risks," security officer Bob Lord reportedly told the staff.


In between all the controversies, the company has more than 80 million active users.

FaceApp has access to more than 150 Million user's faces and names








Everyone is busy posting pictures of themselves how they will look in the future, while security researchers are really worried about the data that users are giving them. 

The Cybersecurity experts at Checkpoint have said that the Russian owned app doesn't have access to your camera roll, but it 'might store' the image that you modified. 

Till now, more than 100 million people have downloaded the app from the Google Play store. While it is a top-ranked app on the iOS App Store. 

According to the terms and condition of the FaceApp, ‘You grant FaceApp a perpetual, irrevocable, nonexclusive, royalty-free, worldwide, fully-paid, transferable sub-licensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, publicly perform and display your User Content and any name, username or likeness provided in connection with your User Content in all media formats and channels now known or later developed, without compensation to you. When you post or otherwise share User Content on or through our Services, you understand that your User Content and any associated information (such as your [username], location or profile photo) will be visible to the public.’

However, the firm addressed the privacy concerns saying that they are storing the uploaded photo in the cloud to increase their performance and deal with the traffic.

In the statement released they clarified that even though their 'core R&D team is located in Russia, none of the user data is transferred to Russia'. 



Security fears over Russian aging app 'FaceApp'









The viral ‘FaceApp’ which predicts how you will look after 50 years, might be exposing users to its Russian developers. 

The security experts issued a warning of security concerns as the app was made in 2017. The app puts a filter over users face, as it has permanent access to your photos. 

According to the experts, the app doesn’t ask for access, store or use images from the user's camera roll. The app access photos without permission.

James Whatley, a strategist from Digitas, says: 'You grant FaceApp a perpetual, irrevocable... royalty-free... license to use, adapt, publish, distribute your user content... in all media formats... when you post or otherwise share.'

The app which is free service uses artificial intelligence to edit a picture and transforms the image into someone double or triple your age. 

FaceApp is currently one of the most downloaded apps for both iOS and Android, as #faceappchallenge posts have taken over social media.