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TrickBot Added New Stealthy Backdoor for High-Value Targets



The authors behind the infamous TrickBot malware – a modular banking trojan that targets sensitive financial information and also acts as a dropper for other malware–have developed a stealthy custom backdoor, circulating by the name 'PowerTrick', to monitor high-value targets and infiltrate them accordingly.

Statistics demonstrate that TrickBot is one of the top crimeware codes and cyberattack groups in existence currently. Developers behind TrickBot have made frequent upgradations in order to evade detection even fluently, empower its stealth, make it hard to research and let it bypass security configurations on user devices.

PowerTrick has been primarily created as an attempt to keep up with the fast paced era of constantly evolving defense mechanisms by effectively bypassing some of the most sophisticated security controls and highly secured networks of high value. Referencing from the statements given by SentinelLabs security researchers, Vitali Kremez, Joshua Platt and Jason Reaves on Thursday, "The end-goal of the PowerTrick backdoor and its approach is to bypass restrictions and security controls to adapt to the new age of security controls and exploit the most protected and secure air-gapped high-value networks."

According to the analysis, PowerTrick is configured to carry out commands and send back the results in the Base64 format. It is injected as a follow-up module after the victim's system has been infected by the TrickBot.

How does it work?

During the examinations, researchers discovered an initial backdoor script being sent out, at times draped as a Powershell task, it goes on to establish contact with command-and-control (C2) server. Once the contact has been successfully established, the authors send their very first command which leads to the downloading of the main PowerTrick backdoor. After the installation of the same, the malware starts executing common backdoor functions, it carries out check-in and then awaits further commands to act upon. Once received, it acts upon these commands and returns the results/errors.

“Once the system and network have been profiled, the actors either stealthily clean up and move on to a different target of choice, or perform lateral movement inside the environment to high-value systems such as financial gateways,” as per the SentinelLab analysis.

"TrickBot has shifted focus to enterprise environments over the years to incorporate many techniques from network profiling, mass data collection, incorporation of lateral traversal exploits,” researchers concluded.

“This focus shift is also prevalent in their incorporation of malware and techniques in their tertiary deliveries that are targeting enterprise environments, it is similar to a company where the focus will shift depending on what generates the best revenue.”

File-less Malware Is Wreaking Havoc Via PowerShell.


File-less Malware Is Wreaking Havoc Via PowerShell





Advanced Volatile Threats (AVTs) also known as the File-less Malware, is another threat which works directly from the memory. PowerShell is a major course adapted by the cyber-cons to achieve the attack.

The malware first suspends a malicious code into the target’s system. Whenever the system is working the code begins to collect the credentials on the system.

In case of a victimized company, the malicious code had started gathering the credentials of its employees, along with the administrator permissions.

The next step it took was to hunt for the most valuable assets of the organization and beeline them.

The code was too cleverly designed to be spotted by the company’s security system and the organization was never alerted.

After doing so much damage to the company and its credibility, the code disappeared without a trace.

These AVTs had surfaced around a year ago, and it works especially on working on the memory rather than on the hard drive.

The traditional and old-fashioned threat detection systems would never in a million chances sense that something’s fishy.

PowerShell is the very basic medium they use to employ the file-less malware attack.

PowerShell lets systems administrators completely automate the tasks on the servers and computers.

Meaning, if the cyber-cons happen to take control of the server and computer they could easily get hold of as many permissions as they’d wish for.



Windows is not a platform PowerShell is limited to. Microsoft Exchange, IIS and SQL servers also fall into line.

What file-less malware does is that it forces PowerShell to institute its malicious code into the console and the RAM.

It becomes a “lateral” attack once the code gets executed, meaning the attack propagates from the central server.

As after the dirty work’s done the malware leaves no traces behind, traditional security solutions are never able to place what was behind the attack.

Only heuristic monitoring systems, if run constantly could help in tracing the attack’s culprit.

Precautionary Measures Against Fileless  Malware

  • Disable PowerShell (If it’s not required to administer systems)
  • If it can’t be disabled, ensure that you’re using the latest version of it. (PowerShell 5 has better security measures in Windows)
  • Only enable specific features of PowerShell via “Constrained Language” mode.
  • Enable automatic transcription of commands which will help in making the system suspicious about file-less attacks.
  • Employ advanced cyber-security methods such as permanent anti-malware services.
  • Do constant research on unknown processes occurring within the system which could generate file-less malware.