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Common Phishing Email Malware Attachments That You Need To Avoid

 




One of the most popular ways of distributing malware is via malicious email attachments poised as invoices, payment recipes, error pages. These emails include attachments to word and excel files, that when opened can install the malware in your system. 

Recognizing these email attachments used by phishing emails could make a big difference towards a safer cyber experience.

Before these files (Word and Excel) could make changes in your system or macros, Office requires you to click on the 'Enable Editing' or 'Enable Content' button which you should never do as it'll enable them to infect your system.

The miscreants trick users by displaying a document template that displays that there is an error in viewing or displaying and ask the user to 'Enable Editing' or 'Enable Content'.

 
Here are some common phishing attachments used by malware attackers that you need to avoid- 

BazarLoader

Malware developed by the TrickBot trojan group, they remotely access your computer to deploy the Ryuk ransomware to the whole network. 

  • BazarLoader usually has phishing attachments containing Word or Excel documents hosted on Google Docs and Google Sheets. 

  • These documents trick the user into downloading the executable file by displaying a template with the message that preview is not available or there were some problems and a link to download the file which then installs the BazaLoader malware.

Dridex 

A trojan said to be linked with WastedLocker used to fish passwords and login credentials. 

  •  It is easy to identify Dridex attachments as they are usually more stylized with company logos and letterheads and contains text that is difficult to read (either very small or obfuscated) and ask you to 'enable editing' to see better. 

  •  They could also be stylized templates copying Delivery or Shipping recipes. 

 Emotet 

The most common email phishing chain that steals your email to send out more spam emails. Emotnet uses warning templates instead of documents like Dridex, asking to enable content to read the document. 

  •  For Example, the 'Red Dawn' template says "This document is protected," and to enable content to read it. 

  •  Another of their template says that the document could not be opened correctly as it was created on 'iOS Device', or that the document on 'Windows 10 Mobile' which has been long discontinued.

  •  Some of the other templates they use are- "Protected View", "Accept Microsoft's license agreement" and "Microsoft Office Transformation Wizard." 

QakBot 

QakBot is a banking trojan partnered with ProLock ransomware, they have very stylized and legit looking templates. 

  •  Their famous template is the 'DocuSign', it looks like a form from DocuSign and asks to 'Enable Content and Editing'. 

 Executable Attachments 

 Files that ends with these - vbs, .js, .exe, .ps1, .jar, .bat, .com, or .scr are almost always malicious and executable files that further download codes and macros in the computer. 

 If you see an email attachments with these file types, never open them and delete them immediately as they are undoubtedly malicious.

Microsoft Office 365 Users Targeted By a New Phishing Campaign Using Fake Zoom Notifications



As people across the world struggle to survive the onslaught of the corona pandemic by switching to the work-from-home criteria, the usage and demand of cloud-based communication platform providing users with audio and videoconferencing services have seen a sudden upsurge.

Zoom is one such platform that has from the beginning of 2020 has seen an extremely high increase of new monthly active users after a huge number of employees have adopted remote working.

However recently Microsoft Office 365 users are being targeted by a brand new phishing campaign that utilizes fake Zoom notifications to caution the users who work in corporate environments that their Zoom accounts have been suspended, with the ultimate goal of stealing Office 365 logins.

Reports are as such that those targeted by this campaign are all the more ready to believe in such emails during this time since the number of remote workers participating in daily online meetings through video conferencing platforms, as Zoom has definitely increased because of stay-at-home orders or lockdowns brought about by the pandemic.

 As of now the phishing campaign mimicking automated Zoom account suspension alerts has received by more than 50,000 mailboxes based on details given by researchers as email security company Abnormal Security who recognized these continuous attacks.

The phishing messages spoof an official Zoom email address and are intended to imitate a real automated Zoom notification.

Utilizing a spoofed email address and an email body practically free from any grammar blunders or typos (other than a self-evident 'zoom' rather than 'Zoom account') makes these phishing messages all the more persuading and conceivably more viable.

The utilization of a lively "Happy Zooming!" toward the end of the email could raise a few cautions however, as it doesn't exactly fit with the rest of the message's tone.




As soon as the users click the "Activate Account" button, they are redirected to a fake Microsoft login page through 'an intermediary hijacked site'.

On the phishing landing page, they are asked to include their Outlook credentials in a form intended to exfiltrate their account subtleties to attacked controlled servers.

On the off chance that they succumb to the attackers' tricks, the victims' Microsoft credentials will be utilized to assume full control for their accounts and all their data will be ready for the picking, later to be utilized as a part of identity theft and fraud schemes like the Business Email Compromise (BEC) attacks.

Despite the fact that the US Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) had warned of BEC abusing popular cloud email services, like Microsoft Office 365 and Google G Suite through Private Industry Notifications issued in March and in April.

Even after this, Office 365 users are continuously targeted by phishing campaigns with the ultimate objective of reaping their credentials.

Regardless Microsoft has warned of phishers' ongoing movement to new types of phishing strategies, like consent phishing, other than conventional email phishing and credential theft attacks.

Microsoft Partner Group PM Manager Agnieszka Girling says, "While application use has accelerated and enabled employees to be productive remotely, attackers are looking at leveraging application-based attacks to gain unwarranted access to valuable data in cloud services,"

The company additionally has made a legal move to destroy some portion of the attack infrastructure used to host malignant 365 OAuth apps utilized in consent phishing to seize victims' Office 365 accounts.

Email Phishing Scam: Scammers Impersonate LogMeIn to Mine Users' Account Credentials


A Boston, Massachusetts based company, LogMeIn that provides software as a service and cloud-based remote connectivity services for collaboration, IT management and customer engagement has fallen prey to the scammers targeting companies' work from home schemes set up due to the ongoing pandemic, the campaign impersonates the remote access tool (RAT) LogMeIn and mines the unsuspecting users' account credentials.

As the number of people working from home increased rapidly, scammers saw it as a golden opportunity to carry out impersonations of remote tools such as Zoom and LogMeIn more blatantly than ever; the first incident being spotted in the month of May confirms the attributions made by the researchers in regard to COVID-19.

In this particular attack, the phishing email appears to be coming from LogMeIn, cautioning the user at the receiving end, of a zero-day exploit present in the LogMeIn Central and LogMeIn Pro- two of the company's products. It goes unsaid that in reality there exists no such vulnerability and victims' are made to follow a link that claims to be LogMein URL but takes the user to a phishing page where they would enter the credentials that would be obtained by the scammers behind the attack. Additionally, the threat actors are also exploiting the security issues that already existed in remote access platforms as a part of this phishing campaign.

While giving further insights, Abnormal Security said “Other collaboration platforms have been under scrutiny for their security as many have become dependent on them to continue their work given the current pandemic,”

“Because of this, frequent updates have become common as many platforms are attempting to remedy the situation. A recipient may be more inclined to update because they have a strong desire to secure their communications.”

In order to avoid being scammed by such phishing campaigns, Ken Liao, vice president of Cybersecurity Strategy at Abnormal, alerted users, "Many of the recent attacks have masqueraded as updates--even more specifically--security updates,"

"As always, users should default to updating applications via the application itself and not via links in emails to prevent not only credential loss but the potential introduction of malware onto their machines."

BazarBackdoor: A Malware similar to Trickbot, targets Corporates


According to cybersecurity experts, a new phishing campaign is allowing malware backdoor entry. The malware which is said to be created by hacking group Trickbot will enable hackers to jeopardize and take control of an organization's network. It is a necessary measure to have a back door for hackers to gain entry access and control the company's network in sophisticated network attacks. It is required in the following cyberattacks- corporate espionage, data extraction attacks, specified ransomware attacks.


According to several reports, the attack was first discovered two weeks ago. The malware is called "BazarBackdoor" or simply "backdoor" by the cybersecurity experts. The malware serves as a tool kit for hackers to gain access to an enterprise's network. Trickbot is said to be the creator of this malware because of BazarBackdoor sharing similar coding, cryptos, and designs.

About BazarBackdoor 

The attacks first start in the form of phishing campaigns that try to lure victims through click baits like 'coronavirus relief funds,' 'customer complaints,' 'COVID reports' or merely a list of downsizing reports that are directly linked to google docs. The hackers, unlike other phishing campaigns, are using creative techniques to lure the users to different landing pages like fake customer complaints page or fake COVID fund relief page. The landing pages either pretend to be a PDF, Word, or Excel document, which can't be viewed appropriately. Hence, a link is provided to the users to view the document appropriately. When the users click the link, the documents get downloaded either in word or PDF format with a 'preview' title. Windows don't have a default file extension; therefore, the user thinks that these files are original. Thus, doing this enables the backdoor entry for the malware.

Attack linked to Trickbot 

According to cybersecurity experts, the malware targets explicitly companies and corporate enterprises. It is likely to be developed by the same hacking group responsible for creating another malware named Trickbot. Trickbot and BazarBackdoor share similar cryptos, and both use the same email patterns to launch their attacks. As a precaution, corporate companies are suggested to stay alert and ask their employees not to open any unknown link sent via email.

Google Is All Set To Fight The Coronavirus Themed Phishing Attacks and Scams


These days of lock-down have left cyber-criminals feeling pretty antsy about “working from home”. Not that it has mattered because apparently, that is why the number of cyber-crime cases has only hiked especially the Phishing attacks.

This has gotten Google working on its machine-learning models to bolster the security of Gmail to create a stronger security front against cyber-criminals.

Given the current conditions, the attackers seem to have a morbid sense when it comes to the themes of the Phishing attacks, i.e. COVID-19. Reportedly, 18 Million such attacks were blocked in a single week. Which amount up to 2.5% of the 100 Million phishing attacks it allegedly dodges every day.

Google, per sources, is also occupied with jamming around 240 Million spam messages on a daily basis. These phishing attacks and spams at such a worrisome time have impelled Google and Microsoft to modify their products’ mechanisms for creating a better security structure.

Reportedly, the number of phishing attacks, in general, hasn’t risen but in the already existing number of attacks, the use of COVID-19 or Coronavirus seems to have been used a lot.

Malware and phishing attacks, especially the ones related to COVID-19 are being pre-emptively monitored. Because being resourceful as the cyber-criminals are the existing campaigns are now being employed with little upgradations to fit the current situation.


A few of the annoying phishing emails include, ones pretending to be from the World Health Organization (WHO) to fool victims into making donations for VICTIMS to a falsified account.

Per the intelligence teams of Microsoft, the Coronavirus themed phishing attacks and scams are just the remodeled versions of the previous attacks.

The attackers are extremely adaptive to the things and issues that their victims might easily get attracted to. Hence a wide variety of baits could be noticed from time to time.

During the lock-down period of the pandemic, health-related and humanitarian organizations have been extensively mentioned in the scams and phishing emails.

Per sources, the Advanced Protection Program (APP) lately acquired new malware protections by enabling Google Play Protect On Android devices to some specifically enrolled accounts.

Allegedly, users trying to join the program with default security keys were suspended, while the ones with physical security keys were still allowed to be enrolled.

All the bettered security provisions of Google shall be turned on by default so that the users can continue to live a safe and secure life amidst the pandemic.

Coronavirus Themed Phishing Attacks Continue to Rise


New data by researchers has demonstrated that cybercriminals are preying on people's concerns regarding the COVID-19 pandemic and carrying out sophisticated phishing, malware and email attacks. The sudden upsurge in the related attacks imply that attackers were quick to adapt to the new global health crisis environment and exploit it in their favor.

As per Barracuda Networks, an American IT security company, the number of email attacks associated with the new Coronavirus has seen a steady surge since January, the type of attack has recorded a 667% spike by the end of February. As per the data, January recorded a total of 137 attacks only, while in the month of February the number spiked to a whopping 1,188 and between March 1st to 23rd, there were as many as 9,116 email attacks in the regard.

Another notable kind of attack is the one where victims are receiving malicious emails with the promises of offering financial relief during the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers warned. Users are being tricked into believing that they will be receiving payments from global institutions, businesses and governments working with a common objective of providing economic aid to common people during the ongoing pandemic, as soon as the user clicks on the links or proceed to download files, the attacker gets illicit access to his credentials, card data, and other sensitive information.

One such campaign is found to be specifically attacking U.S. healthcare, IT sector and higher-education organizations, the emails sent in relation to this campaign contain a message titled "General Payroll!"

"The Trump administration is considering sending most American adults a check for $1,000 as part of the efforts to stimulate the economy and help workers whose jobs have been disrupted by business closures because of the pandemic,” it says.

“All staff/faculty & employee include students are expected to verify their email account for new payroll directory and adjustment for the month of March benefit payment.” The message further reads.

Users receiving the email are asked to access a malicious link that will direct them to a phishing page in order to verify their email account, they will be required to enter their usernames, email addresses, and passwords linked with their employee benefits. By doing so, the user will provide his personal data to the page controlled by the attackers.

“The ongoing shift to coronavirus-themed messages and campaigns is truly social engineering at scale, and these recent payment-related lures underscore that threat actors are paying attention to new developments,” researchers told.

Why Hackers are Taking Advantage of COVID-19?


Cybersecurity threats have seen a massive upsurge since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic that forced a majority of people to work from home which now is leading to attacks on remote workforces. Amid the anxiety it created, hackers have devised multiple ways to take advantage of the coronavirus and continued to exploit the fear amongst people in a number of ways, one being the distribution malware in the facade of Covid-19 or Corona related emails.

The threat posed by the Coronavirus has been seen to be scaling beyond human health, job losses and the collapsing global economy as it also set the stage for hackers to scam people for monetary and other gains. The urgency revolving around the novel biological virus robbed tech vendors and corporate systems of their ability to effectively tackle the risks. Scammers are well aware of the overwhelmed state of cybersecurity groups that led to a dramatic rise in phishing attempts and cyberattacks. Notably, hackers are exploiting the Covid-19 charged environment in various ways such as malicious infiltration of organizations, voice phishing, WhatsApp phishing, email phishing, social media, fake apps, and websites. As per the warnings given by WHO, criminals are also acting as WHO officials in order to scam people for financial gains or sensitive data.

Problems Arising with Security Operation Centers (SOC)? 

Security Operation Center is a centralized function set up across a company's IT infrastructure. The objective of the security operation team here is to detect and then respond to cybersecurity risks in order to safeguard important assets such as business systems, employee data, and intellectual property. Upon detecting a confirm threat, the SOC immediately isolates endpoints in an attempt to terminate harmful actions such as execution or deletion. It does do while ensuring no disruption is faced by the business continuity or lessening the impact to the best of its ability.

However, as the process of strengthening an organization's security requires sophisticated infrastructure (SIEM system), coordinated efforts and continuous monitoring by people and technology-with limited staff and people made to work from home, it has become difficult to prevent, detect, analyze and respond to cybersecurity incidents.

The SOC relies upon cybersecurity tools whose operations require complete understanding and expertise making the overall workflow complex, therefore the prevention and security can not take place whilst being at home.

Adverse Impact on IT Sector

IT sector is the lifeline of almost every global economy, it plays a vital role in the functioning of nearly every other major sector including human resources, manufacturing, finance, security, and health care. It's a well-known fact how heavily IT organizations rely on manpower to function, however, due to the lockdowns, quarantine periods and stringent curbs in the movement of people, many businesses are being shut down as the global supply chains of manufacturing are being heavily disrupted. IT professionals are not able to deliver on the projects, as a result of which production dropped by a significant margin and is expected to drop even further.

The coronavirus situation worsens with the security vendors not being paid timely and as a result of halted work, gates are being left unmanned providing potential hackers with an opening. Companies are advised to stay prepared for security breaches and individuals should consider sticking to strong passwords and keeping their systems updated as the number of scams is expected to rise amid the tremendous uncertainty of the crisis.

Insider data breaches : a big concern say 97% of IT leaders


According to a survey by Egress, a shocking 97% of IT leaders said insider breach is a big concern. 78% think employees have put the company's data in jeopardy accidentally while 75% think they (employees) put data at risk intentionally. And asking about the consequences and implication of these risk, 45% said financial damage would be the greatest.


Egress surveyed more than 500 IT leaders and 5000 employees from UK, US and Benelux regions. The survey showed serious incompetence of IT sector in handling data and their own security as well as employee confusion about data ownership and responsibility.

On the question of how they manage insider data breach and security measures they use, half of IT leaders said they use antivirus software to detect phishing attacks, 48% use email encryption and 47% use secure collaboration tools. And 58% , that is more than half relied on employee reporting than any breach detecting system.

Egress CEO, Tony Pepper says that the report shows the ignorance of IT leaders towards insider breaches and the lack of risk management on their part.
 “While they acknowledge the sustained risk of insider data breaches, bizarrely IT leaders have not adopted new strategies or technologies to mitigate the risk. Effectively, they are adopting a risk posture in which at least one-third of employees putting data at risk is deemed acceptable. “The severe penalties for data breaches mean IT leaders must action better risk management strategies, using advanced tools to prevent insider data breaches. They also need better visibility of risk vectors; relying on employees to report incidents is not an acceptable data protection strategy.”

Misdirected and phishing emails are top cause of insider data breaches- 

Misdirected and phishing emails are top cause of accidental insider data breaches as 41% of employees who leaked data said they did it because of phishing emails and 31% said they sent the information to the wrong individual by email.

 Tony Pepper adds;
“Incidents of people accidentally sharing data with incorrect recipients have existed for as long as they’ve had access to email. As a fundamental communication tool, organizations and security teams have weighed the advantages of efficiency against data security considerations, and frequently compromise on the latter. 
“However, we are in an unprecedented time of technological development, where tools built using contextual machine learning can combat common issues, such as misdirected emails, the wrong attachments being added to communications, auto-complete mistakes, and employees not using encryption tools correctly. Organizations need to tune into these advances to truly be able to make email safe.”

Phishing Scam: Puerto Rico Government Loses More than $2.6 million



Puerto Rico's government fell for an email phishing scam and unintentionally lost over $2.6 million to cyber-criminals behind the scam, as per a senior Puerto Rico official. It is a government-owned agency whose mission is to drive economic development on the island while working with local as well as foreign investors.

These days, scammers launch thousands of phishing scams like these which resulted in it being a top reported crime to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), in the past year, as per the IC3 annual report released recently. Some top victims of a similar kind of attack from last year include a Texas school district being scammed for $2.3m, a British community housing non-profit being scammed for $1.2m and Nikkei for a whopping $29m.

On Wednesday a complaint was filed to police, in which Rubén Rivera, finance director of the island's Industrial Development Company confirmed that the money has been sent to a fraudulent account by an unsuspecting employee from Puerto Rico's Industrial Development Company. The officials discovered the incident earlier this week and it was immediately reported to the FBI, according to the statements given by the executive director of the agency, Manuel Laboy to the Associated Press.

However, Laboy did not comment on how the officials came to know about the phishing scam and the aftermath of the incident involving employees being dismissed or how this incident affected the overall operations when the funds went missing. He further told that an internal investigation has been instigated to find out if someone disregarded the set standards and were negligent about the laid out procedures, he also added that the officials at the corporation are attempting to recover the lost funds.

The agency received a fraudulent email claiming that the bank account used by them for remittance payments should not be used anymore for that purpose and it also told the agency that they should transfer the money to a new account that belonged to the criminals operating the scam which agency was oblivious to.

Acknowledging the seriousness of the matter and addressing the criticism from the Puerto Ricans Laboy told, “This is a very serious situation, extremely serious, we want it to be investigated until the last consequences,” “I cannot speculate about how these things might happen,” “It’s a big responsibility.”

New Hacking Group Deploying Backdoors and Ransomware in Windows via Word docs


Researchers from Proofpoint have detected a scheme of malware campaigns from a new hacking group called TA2101, that's targeting various organizations from Germany and Italy, creating backdoor malware into their security systems. These attackers also trick people by impersonating the United States Postal Service and tax entities and distributing 'Maze Ransomware' as well as banking Trojans. The research group noted that these attackers use legal and licensed penetration tools like Cobalt Strike and Metasploit after entering the network. These tools are used by organizations to secure their network by analyzing loopholes and vulnerabilities, meanwhile, adversaries like Cobalt Group, APT32, and APT19 exploit this software by installing backdoors.

Deploying Backdoors in Windows via Word Docs 

These malicious actors have been tricking victims into clicking through phishing emails that contain ransomware and even banking trojans- by sending email alerts that require immediate action, like emails from the German Federal Ministry of Finance, United States Postal Service, law enforcement and finance firms. But, what's happening behind the curtains is them deploying ransomware in your windows via a word document, that opens when you open the attachment.

Proofpoint researchers have been observing these impersonators from October 16 until November 12, 2019, their collected data gave a clear sight of the attacker's target, how they operate by sending spams to companies, IT units from Germany, Italy, and United States. “Researchers also Observed a consistent set of TTP (Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures) that allows attribution of these campaigns to a single actor with high confidence. These include the use of .icu domains, as well as identical email addresses for the Start of Authority (SOA) resource records stored for the DNS entries for the domains used in these campaigns”, Proof point said.

Among the samples, the emails contained attached weaponized word documents which when opened, made the system perform a series of commands- that is turning on PowerShell script, which eventually downloads and installs the Maze ransomware. In targets related to Healthcare Vertical and companies, the emails and word documents installed IcedID payload trojan into the system.

Yet Another Phishing Campaign by Hackers That Abuses QR Codes To Redirect Targets to Phishing Landing Pages



 Attackers come up with yet another phishing campaign that misuses QR codes to divert the targets to phishing landing pages. Researchers responsible for discovering this crusade distinguished that it quite effectively evades security solutions and controls intended to stop such attacks in their tracks.

The attackers previously utilized a URL encoded in a QR code target on the French Cofense customers to dodge the security software which dissects and accordingly blocks  suspicious or 'blacklisted areas' .

They even included a GIF image containing the QR code which would redirect them to the hxxps://digitizeyourart.whitmers[.]com/wp-content/plugins/wp-school/Sharepoint/sharepoint/index.php domain intended to act like a SharePoint-related site.

The phishing mails were disguised as a SharePoint email with a "Review Important Document" headline and a message body which would welcome potential victims to  "Scan Bar Code to View Document."
Phishing Email

Removing the victims from the overall safety of their computers thusly enables the cybercriminals to adequately sidestep any link protection services ,secure email portals, sandboxes, or web content filters set up by the targets' corporate information security department.

To make the attack considerably progressively fruitful against mobile users, the attackers have likewise upgraded their landing pages for smartphones with the phishing page and thus providing a custom view on the mobile devices.

Phishing landing page
Researchers from Cofense, the leading provider of human-driven phishing defense solutions world-wide, state that QRishing is a fairly notable technique utilized by cybercriminals to abstain from phishing filters and security solutions build especially to block such attacks before the pernicious emails reach the targets' inboxes.

Phishing landing page on a mobile

Along these lines , a conceivable protection against them named QRCS (Quick Response Code Secure), which would be "a universal efficient and effective solution focusing exclusively on the authenticity of the originator and consequently the integrity of QR code by using digital signatures, “was proposed in a paper from the Carnegie Mellon University's CyLab Study , which could perhaps prove to be valuable later on in the future.

Florida city to pay $600,000 to a ransomware gang





The city council of  Riviera Beach, Florida, have voted unanimously to pay more than $600,000 in Bitcoins to a ransomware gang who had held its computer systems hostage for three weeks. 

The ransomware spread throughout the city’s computer network, after an employee clicked on a malicious link in an email. 

"Ransomware is commonly delivered through phishing emails or via 'drive-by downloads,'" according to Homeland Security. "Phishing emails often appear as though they have been sent from a legitimate organization or someone known to the victim and entice the user to click on a malicious link or open a malicious attachment."

The attack has locked all files and shut down all the city's services. Operations have been down ever since, with the exception of 911 services, which were able to continue to operate, although limited.

According to the Palm Beach Post’s report the ransomware affected the city’s email, 911 calls couldn't enter into computer records, and systems that controlled the water utility were offline.

The city council first decided to resolve the issue by paying $941,000 for new computers, but now they have decided to pay the ransom.

The amount of money would be paid from the city's insurer, although it's unclear wether hackers will decrypt the locked files afterward or not. 

The city council refused to comment.  



Phishing Attacks on Microsoft and Outlook; By Way of Microsoft’s Azure Blob Storage




Two major phishing campaigns have been discovered by the researchers which uses Microsoft’s Azure blob to steal details from Outlook and Microsoft accounts.


Both the campaigns employ real-looking landing pages which make use of SSL certificates and the windows.net domain to seem authentic.

The first phishing email goes around asking the receivers to log into their office 365 account to update the information.

The emails happened to have “Action Required: (email address) information is outdated-Re-validate now!!” in their subject boxes.

The moment a user clicks on the link provided in the mail, they will be directed to a landing page which fake-acts as the organization’s Outlook Web App.

This landing page is what does the main task of stealing the credentials from the user.

The second one works on stealing users’ Microsoft account details and credentials.

The process to lure in the user starts from Facebook’s workplace service and ends up taking the user to a Microsoft’s landing page.

This could either be s single-sign-on approach or a mixed up campaign for luring victims in.

The Microsoft account the users are brought to, is fairly legit looking as it uses the same form and the same background for that matter.

Both the landing pages make use of Azure Blog Storage to make them look convincing and as far as possible, legitimate.

All Microsoft Azure does is that is adds legitimacy to the landing pages used by the phishing-cons to target the Microsoft services.

The Azure Blob storage URLs use the windows.net domain making the landings look fairly legitimate.

One of the phishing links which is not in use anymore had the URL-  https://1drive6e1lj8tcmteh5m.z6.web.core.windows.net/ and the domain name seemed to do the trick.

Also, every URL on Azure Blob Storage happens to be using a wildcard SSL certificate from Microsoft, making every landing page get a “lock symbol”.

This would exhibit a Microsoft certificate every time a user would try to click on the certificate to check who signed, making the entire sham all the more believable.

To steer clear of such phishing attack one thing need to be kept in mind that the original login forms from Outlook and Microsoft could indubitably have outlook.com, live.com, and Microsoft.com as their domain names.