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Showing posts with label Mozilla Firefox. Show all posts

Total Cookie Protection Launched in The New Upgrade of Firefox

 

Mozilla's latest Firefox 86 has been rolled -out for desktop, Mac, Windows, and Linux platforms. The browser upgrade brings features like multiple image mode and video replay, backward and forward buttons. Total Cookie Protection has been integrated into the Strict Enhanced Tracking Protection (ETP) platform, which has been revealed on Tuesday with the launch of Firefox 86. Complete cookie protections were referred to as 'huge advance' in containing cookies that are placed into new 'cookie jars' by websites. 

Cookies are text files containing tiny pieces of information by which the computer can be detected. While intended to enhance the viewing experience on the website, it could also be used, despite any permission, to track online activities. Google now plans to destroy third-party cookies as part of its Sandbox privacy project on its Chrome web browser, an effort that aims to allow personal ads while restricting data detection. 

Mozilla uses the 'cookie jar' example to explain the current blocker, whereby each third-party that drops a cookie in the browser has all the collected knowledge limited to its own cookie jar. This stops trackers from monitoring the activities from site to site. In its battle to protect the privacy of people while accessing the internet, Mozilla's Total Cookie Protection is the most recent maneuver. Total cookie protection adds up to current Firefox attempts to prevent websites and online publicity providers from making a profile of one’s web history through using internet cookies as well as other computer scripts. 

“Any time a website, or third-party content embedded in a website, deposits a cookie in your browser, that cookie is confined to the cookie jar assigned to that website, such that it is not allowed to be shared with any other website,” Mozilla wrote in a blog post. 

The company wants to silo off each because the cookie data is exchanged on the pages. Online advertisers can then understand what websites users want to access so that they can try and send relevant ads. 

“In combining Total Cookie Protection with last month’s super cookie protections, Firefox is now armed with very strong, comprehensive protection against cookie tracking,” the company said. 

The Total Cookie Protection also provides an exception for non-tracking cookie-related scripts such as third-party login or password plugins.

The potential solution should therefore help avoid the breakdown of a website. Mozilla has taken a page in the "first party isolation" of Tor browser to develop total cookie protection, which also requires cookies to be segregated into the website domain.

Mozilla Firefox Disabling Backspace Key to Prevent Data Loss

Mozilla Firefox is about to disable the browser's backspace key to help users avoid data loss. 

In 2014, Google Chrome and Microsoft Edge have already removed the ability to go back to a previous page by using the backspace key as there were possibilities of losing data entered into forms on the current page. Those who are using Google Chrome have to download an extension to use this again, whereas Microsoft Edge had offered a flag for its users to re-active it. In the same way, Mozilla Firefox is also offering its users the option to re-activate the backspace key if they wish to do so. 

"Would be useful to determine how commonly backspace is used as a "back" action shortcut, so we can figure out if we need to tweak the UX somehow to avoid accidental loss of form data due to mistyping the backspace key," Google Chrome developers stated in a 2014 bug post. 

According to the sources, seven years ago, Mozilla Firefox had set up the committee and reviewed the bug post: whether the backspace key should be disabled or not. Finally, the committee had decided not to change anything at that time. Around six years later, Mozilla finally came to the point where it has decided to remove the backspace key after realizing that except for Mozilla and Internet Explorer 11, no browsers support this keyboard shortcut. 

"To prevent user data loss when filling out forms, the Backspace key as a navigation shortcut for "Go back one page" is now disabled. To re-enable the Backspace keyboard shortcut, you can change the about: config preference browser.backspace_action to 0. You can also use the recommended Alt + Left arrow (Command + Left arrow on Mac) shortcut instead," Firefox Release Manager Pascal Chevrel added to the Firefox Nightly 86.0a1 release notes. 

According to TechDows, the first who reported about this change which is now available live on the Firefox browser for users to test and know. 
Further information is for those users who want to continue using the backspace key, you will be able to re-enable this key just follow these steps: 

1. Enter about: config in the Firefox address bar. 
2. Search for browser.backspace_action and change its value to '0'. 

Once the setting is configured, you will be able to use the backspace key to go back to the previous page in Mozilla Firefox.

Firefox expected to release a fix for their "Camera active after phone locks" bug this October


A bug in Mozilla Firefox enabled websites to keep the smartphone camera active even after leaving the browser or locking the phone. The company is working on fixing the bug and are planning to release the fix around October this year.


The bug was first reported by Appear TV, a video delivery platform last year in July. The bug activates when a user opens a video streaming app from their Mozilla Firefox browser in their Android smartphone.

It was first noticed by Appear TV when the video kept playing in the background even when it should have stopped that is the video kept playing in the background even when the user moved out of the browser or pushed it to the background or locked the phone. This raised concerns over user's privacy and bandwidth loss. "From our analysis, a website is allowed to retain access to your camera or microphone whilst you're using other apps, or even if the phone is locked," said a privacy app, Traced in talks with ZDNet. "While there are times you might want the microphone or video to keep working in the background, your camera should never record you when your phone is locked".

On Fixing the Issue

 "As is the case with dedicated conferencing apps, we provide a system notification that lets people know when a website within Firefox is accessing the camera or microphone, but recognize that we can do better, especially since this gets hidden when the screen is locked," a Mozilla spokesperson said in a statement.

"This bug [fix] aims to address this by defaulting to audio-only when the screen is locked," Mozilla added. "[The fix] is scheduled for release at the platform-level this October, and for consumers shortly after."

Mozilla has been working on a next-generation browser Firefox Nightly with more focus on privacy to replace their current browser for Android. The update is out for testing.

"Meanwhile, our next-generation browser for Android, now available for testing as Firefox Nightly, already has a prominent notification for when sites access this hardware as well," said Mozilla.