Search This Blog

Showing posts with label Kasperksy. Show all posts

Kaspersky Lab detected a new threat to user data

 Kaspersky Lab experts discovered a targeted cyber espionage campaign, where attackers infect computers with malware that collects all recent documents on the victim's device, archives them and passes them back to them.

The UEFI program is loaded before the operating system and controls all processes at an "early start". Using it, an attacker can gain full control over the computer: change the memory, disk contents, or force the operating system to run a malicious file. Neither replacing the hard drive nor reinstalling the OS will help get rid of it.

"This file is a bootloader, it communicates with the control server, collects all recent documents on the computer, archives them, and sends them back to the server. In fact, this is just espionage. Now there is information about two victims of the UEFI bootkit, as well as several victims of the campaign who encountered targeted phishing. All of them are diplomats or members of nonprofit organizations, and their activities are related to North Korea," commented Igor Kuznetsov, a leading anti-virus expert at Kaspersky Lab.

The experts also found out that the components of the UEFI bootkit are based on the Vector-EDK code - a special constructor that was created by the cyber group Hacking Team and contains instructions for creating a module for flashing UEFI. In 2015, as a result of a leak, these and other sources of the Hacking Team were freely available, which allowed attackers to create their own software.

"Be that as it may, we are dealing with a powerful, advanced tool for cyber attacks, far from every attacker can do this. However, with the appearance of ready-made working examples, there is a danger of reusing the technology, especially since the instructions for it can still be downloaded by anyone,” added Kuznetsov.

Interestingly, five years ago, Kaspersky Lab already found undetectable viruses. Then the control servers and traces of attacks of the Equation hacker group were discovered, it was associated with the American special services.

Discovery of a New Malware Framework and Its Linkages with a North Korean Hacker Group



The discovery of a brand new malware framework and its linkages with a North Korean hacker group has heightened the panic within the digital world. Kaspersky, the cybersecurity company has already alerted the SOC groups of the discovery.

Referred to as  "MATA," the framework has been being used since around April 2018, principally to help in attacks intended to steal customer databases and circulate ransomware.

The framework itself gives its controllers the adaptability to target Windows, Linux, and macOS and comprises of a few components including loader, orchestrator, and plugins.

Kaspersky associated its utilization to the North Korean group "Lazarus”, which has been engaged for a considerable length of time in 'cyber-espionage' and sabotage and, by means of its Bluenoroff subgroup, endeavors to collect illegal funds for its Pyongyang masters.

The group was even pegged for WannaCry, just as refined attacks on financial institutions including the notorious $81m raid of Bangladesh Bank. Kaspersky senior researcher, Seongsu Park, contended that the most recent attacks connected to Lazarus display its eagerness to invest serious resources to create new malware toolsets in the chase for money and data.

“Furthermore, writing malware for Linux and macOS systems often indicates that the attacker feels that he has more than enough tools for the Windows platform, which the overwhelming majority of devices are run on. This approach is typically found among mature APT groups” he added later.

“We expect the MATA framework to be developed even further and advise organizations to pay more attention to the security of their data, as it remains one of the key and most valuable resources that could be affected.”

The security vendor encouraged the SOC teams to get to the most recent threat intelligence feeds, install dedicated security on all Windows, macOS and Linus endpoints, and to back-up regularly.

The framework seems to have been deployed in a wide variety of scenarios, focusing on e-commerce firms, software developers, and ISPs across Poland, Germany, Turkey, Korea, Japan, and India.

Trojans, Backdoors and Droppers the Top Three Malware Globally?



According to a few recent surveys and analysis conducted by some well-known and influential cybersecurity agencies, there are approximately 3 top malwares that the users should be aware of. 

'Gate-crashing' enterprises and users globally are Trojans, Backdoors, and Droppers which comprise 72 percent of the total cyber-attacks across the globe, as per anonymized statistics from free requests from Kaspersky Threat Intelligence Portal. 

The statistics likewise show that the different sorts of malware that researchers most frequently examine and investigate don't harmonize with the most widespread ones. 

By and large, submitted hashes or dubious uploaded files ended up being Trojans (25 percent of requests), Backdoors, a malware that gives an attacker remote control over a computer (24 percent), and Trojan-Droppers (23 percent) that install different malignant objects. 

Denis Parinov, Acting Head of Threats Monitoring and Heuristic Detection explains "We have noticed that the number of free requests to the Kaspersky Threat Intelligence Portal to check viruses or pieces of code that insert themselves in over other programs, is extremely low less than one percent, but it is traditionally among the most widespread threats detected by endpoint solutions," 

Later added, “Viruses are rarely of interest to researchers, most likely because they lack novelty compared to other threats." 

Despite the fact that Trojans are typically the most widespread type of malware, however, Backdoors and Trojan-Droppers are not as common as they just make up 7 percent and 3 percent of every malevolent file blocked by the Kaspersky endpoint products. 

The researchers say, "This difference can be explained by the fact that researchers are often interested in the final target of the attack, while endpoint protection products are seeking to prevent it at an early stage," 

Nonetheless, in order to develop response and remediation measures, security analysts need to distinguish the objective of the attack, the root of a malignant object, its prominence, and at the end, the report specified that it's the security researchers who need to identify all components within the dropper.

In April, experts identified 18 million cyberattacks on Russian companies working remotely


According to Kaspersky Lab, in April, the number of attacks on the infrastructure of Russian organizations whose employees work remotely exceeded 18 million, which is five times more than in February.

Hackers select the username and password from an employee's account to log into the corporate infrastructure, explains Kaspersky Lab’s antivirus expert Dmitry Galov.

According to him, such attacks are the simplest. Hackers use, for example, dictionaries of popular passwords or passwords from leaked databases.

Brute force passwords are used on average in 70% of attacks on remote desktops using the RDP protocol.

Positive Technologies found that up to 48% of the passwords of employees of organizations is made up of a combination of a word indicating the time of the year or month and four digits indicating the year.

"After gaining access, a hacker can, for example, launch an encryption virus into the corporate network to offer the management to buy the decryption code", said Dmitry Galov.
Andrey Arsentiev, Head of Analytics and Special Projects at InfoWatch, agreed that less experienced hackers sell data for access to more advanced colleagues. He noted that in recent months, offers of access to corporate infrastructure has grown on the black market from the price of $5-10 to tens of thousands of dollars.

According to the results of the first quarter of 2020, the number of offers for selling access around the world is 69% higher than in the previous quarter. The growth of such attacks in Kaspersky Lab is associated with a hasty transition to remote work: IT-services of companies were more concerned with organizing a remote workstation than with its security.

To protect against attacks, Kaspersky Lab recommends that companies use a corporate VPN and two-factor authentication and that employees set complex passwords.

24 Million Adware Attacks found on Windows


Avast, a security firm, discovered in their research the growing scale of adware. According to the report, around 72% of malware on android was adware. Another report by Malwarebytes reveals some shocking numbers with 24 million windows adware detections and 30 million on Macs. Nowadays, with good search engines and added internet security, we hardly consider adware as a severe threat. There was a time, around 2002 when adware attacks were at an all-time high. It was quite common to be faced with pop-ups and adds opening another window showing adverts. Only a few software provided essential protection against these pop-ups.


But in this digital-savvy decade, we hardly consider pop-ups as a security threat, but this report by Avast tells a different story. The numbers show that adware is still very much present and thriving. "Adware is unwanted software designed to throw advertisements up on your screen, most often within a web browser." This adware campaign can have malicious intents, especially using COVID-19, to fulfill their purposes.

Kaspersky released a report in which more than 120,000 malware and adware were impersonating meeting software like Zoom. Most evident were: DealPly and DownloadSponsor. This adware has evolved from their previous counterparts to a high capacity. Now they display that install and download other adware software. In some cases, the adware DealPly and ManageX can be installed automatically with the legitimate installer and other potentially unwanted applications (PUAs). Battling with adware is a hard war because of their large numbers. There are hundreds of apps developed every day and registered; many come laden with adware. To check every single one of them is more robust than finding a needle in a haystack.

In March, Google banned 56 malicious applications, but by then, they already had around a million downloads. It is effortless for these apps to pose as legitimate and carry adware along with them. Adware is often ignored in the shadows of more severe security threats, and even though it is less harmful, it nonetheless is far more ubiquitous. Hence, security teams must be cautious of adware and take preventive steps.