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Facebook is testing Instagrams' new messaging app, Threads with Automated Data Sharing


Facebook's team is working on a companion app for Instagram, called "Threads", which will automatically share your location, battery, a movement to a close group of friends.


It is much like a messenger application and the company plans to rival snapchat, an app that also caters to close friends and sharing updates. Though Snapchat has been standing as a good alternative for Facebook and Instagram with much more engagement with young people, Threads could be a game-changer.

The Instagram team was itself working on Direct, a messaging app since 2017 but they closed the project in May. But after the acquisition by Facebook, the team was transferred to the Facebook Messenger team and Threads could be the prized outcome.

 The Verge reported, "Threads will regularly update your status, giving your friends a real-time view of information about your location, speed, and more. At the moment, Threads does not display your real-time location — instead, it might say something like a friend is 'on the move'." 

Though the core of the messaging app will be that "messaging", where friends can text, and even see status updates made on Instagram and can manually update the status on Threads but it does not dispute the privacy concerns over the automated data sharing. 

Concerns over privacy and data 

Facebook is testing Automated data sharing on Instagrams' companion app Threads and if successful we could see it applied to other Facebook apps too. Privacy, of course, is a big concern with automatic updates and does need to be concerned over but what's more interesting is how Facebook could use this data. After Mark Zuckerberg's pivot over privacy and data, Facebook has become more private and a loss but with this new automated data sharing, users can become layman and habitual of sharing their updates.

“You change your behavior if you’re constantly being looked at,” said Siân Brooke, a researcher at Oxford Internet Institute "If you know people see where you are, what you’re consuming, you’ll change what you’re doing, change what is normal in a group.”

And thus the data mining cycle will resume where data could be tracked by the app and sold.

Here's All you Need to Know About Instagram Reels; Launched Globally in Over 50 Countries


As TikTok fell prey to extensive criticism and was labeled as a 'threat to security' by governments, resulting in the banning of the popular video-sharing platform, the creators have long ago started weighing what's next!

In the wake of TikTok's future succumbing to uncertainties, Instagram has rolled out a new feature 'Reels', that appear to be in direct competition with what TikTok had to offer.

Starting today, Instagram is launching "Reels" feature for its users in more than 50 countries, it is seen as a remarkable and well-timed attempt by Instagram to capitalize upon the global turmoil in the creative sphere of social media. It's also a potential opportunity for Instagram to expand its identity from a photo app to a video entertainment platform.

With the expansion, now the feature will be available in major international markets including India, the U.S., the U.K., France, Brazil, Germany, Australia, Mexico, Spain, Argentina, Japan, and many others.

In a similar manner like TikTok, Instagram Reels will allow people to create mini-clips with music that they can share with their followers, these short-form videos will be discoverable while users browse the "Explore" tab on Instagram.

Reels let users record 15 seconds long video clips and add filters, effects, and popular music onto them, the feature is entirely embedded inside Instagram's original app and is not to be mistaken for being an add-on or a separate app. It is not a different world altogether like TikTok or Vine, but just 'yet another thing' one can do on Instagram.

While announcing the release of "Reels", the company said in a blog, "It's a new way to create and discover short, entertaining videos on Instagram."

"Reels invites you to create fun videos to share with your friends or anyone on Instagram. Record and edit 15-second multi-clip videos with audio, effects, and new creative tools. You can share reels with your followers on Feed, and, if you have a public account, make them available to the wider Instagram community through a new space in Explore. Reels in Explore offers anyone the chance to become a creator on Instagram and reach new audiences on a global stage."

How to Create Reels?


"Select Reels at the bottom of the Instagram camera. You'll see a variety of creative editing tools on the left side of your screen to help create your reel, including:"

"Audio: Search for a song from the Instagram music library. You can also use your own original audio by simply recording a reel with it. When you share a reel with original audio, your audio will be attributed to you, and if you have a public account, people can create reels with your audio by selecting “Use Audio” from your reel.

AR Effects: Select one of the many effects in our effect gallery, created both by Instagram and creators all over the world, to record multiple clips with different effects.

Timer and Countdown: Set the timer to record any of your clips hands-free. Once you press record, you’ll see a 3-2-1 countdown, before recording begins for the amount of time you selected.

Align: Line up objects from your previous clip before recording your next to help create seamless transitions for moments like outfit changes or adding new friends into your reel.

Speed: Choose to speed up or slow down part of the video or audio you selected. This can help you stay on a beat or make slow-motion videos." Instagram explained in the blog.

A vulnerability that Allows Hackers to Hijack Facebook Accounts


A cybersecurity expert recently found a vulnerability in FB's "login with the Facebook feature." According to the expert, the vulnerability allows hackers to steal "Access Token," and the hacker can also hijack the victim's FB account. FB uses "OAuth 2.0" as a verification process that helps exchange FB tokens and also gives 3rd parties access permission. To know more about OAuth 2.0, the readers can find information on the internet.

The vulnerability exists in the "Login with Facebook" option that eventually lets hackers make a phony website which they used for exchanging Access Tokens for other applications that include Spotify, Netflix, Instagram, Tinder, Oculus, etc besides the hijacked FB profiles. Once the hacker succeeded in hijacking the targeted FB accounts using the Access Tokens, he had access to personal data that includes private messages, photos, videos, and also the account setup credentials.


According to Amol Baikar, an Indian cybersecurity expert who found this vulnerability in the first place, the FB flaw allows hackers to exploit user accounts that include Tinder, FB, Oculus, Spotify, Instagram, Netflix, etc. Meanwhile, along with this account hijack, the hacker can also get 3rd party access to the mentioned apps via "Login with Facebook option." Facebook first received this vulnerability in December 2019 and immediately issued a security fix. Along with this, the company Facebook also announced a $55,000 bounty upon finding the person responsible through the Bug Bounty Program. This is said to be the biggest bounty ever issued for a client suite hack vulnerability founded on Facebook.

Cybersecurity organization GBHackers have made the following observations regarding Facebook vulnerability: 

  1. All Fb apps and 3rd party apps login credentials (Access Token) could be exposed within a few seconds, at the same time. 
  2. The vulnerability allows the hacker to take over the Facebook account of the user. Moreover, the hacker can read, write, edit, and delete your data. 
  3. The hacker also has the option to modify your privacy settings in the FB account. 
  4. If a user visits the malicious website set up by the hackers, he/she can lose their 1st party Access Tokens. 
  5. The stolen 1st party Access Tokens never lapse. 
  6. The attacker has control over the hijacked Facebook account even after the user changes the login credentials.

Facebook official Twitter and Instagram accounts hacked!


"Well, even Facebook is hackable but at least their security is better than Twitter.", this opening statement was posted on Facebook's official Twitter account by the hacking group OurMine.



Though the accounts have now been restored, the hacking group OurMine posted the same on Facebook's Twitter, messenger and Instagram accounts.

OurMine says its hacks are to show the sheer vulnerability of cyberspace. In January, they attacked and hijacked dozens of US National Football League teams accounts.

They posted the following on Facebook's Twitter page-

Hi, we are O u r M i n e,
Well, even Facebook is hackable but at least their security is better than twitter. 

 to improve your account security
 Contact us: contact@o u r m In e.org 

 For security services visit: o u r m In e.org 

On Instagram, they posted OurMine logo whereas Facebook's own website was left alone. Twitter has confirmed that the accounts were hacked albeit via a third-party and the accounts were then locked.

"As soon as we were made aware of the issue, we locked the compromised accounts and are working closely with our partners at Facebook to restore them," Twitter said in a statement.

These attacks followed the same trend as they did in the attack on the teams of the National Football League.

The accounts were accessed by Khoros, a third-party platform. Khoros is a marketing platform, a software that allows people to manage their social media accounts all in one space. It can be used by businesses to manage their social media communications. These platforms like Khoros, have the login details of the customers. OurMine seemed to have gained access to these accounts through this platform.

OurMine is a Dubai based hacking group known for attacking accounts of corporations and high profile people. It has hacked social media accounts of quite a few influential individuals like Twitter's founder Jack Dorsey, Google's chief executive Sundar Pichai, and the corporate accounts of Netflix and ESPN. According to OurMine, their attacks are intended to show people cybersecurity vulnerabilities and advises it's victims to use its services to improve security.

Clause Addition to the IT Act; Social Media Companies Now Responsible For All Nonuser Generated Content


A change brought in line with the changes in the US and Europe, the Indian government has recently added a clause to the proposed IT intermediary guidelines, making social media companies responsible for all nonuser produced content including supported content, distributed on their platforms. 

The change is expected to impact some extremely popular social media platforms, like Twitter, TikTok, YouTube, Instagram as well as Facebook. 

When the amended guidelines are made public, social media organizations will be required to accordingly and appropriately tag and identify all sponsored content published on their platforms and alongside it, draft standards, which are 'under consideration' of the law ministry, are expected to be notified in about a few weeks according to a senior government official “We have had a few rounds of discussions with the law ministry. 

These guidelines should be notified by February-end, the start of March.” Section 79-II of the Information Technology Act, 2000, right now absolves online intermediaries from obligation for any third party substance shared on their platform. In any case, with the new clause, the Act will give "safe harbor protection" to intermediaries, inasmuch as they just assume the job of a facilitator and not maker or modifier, in any way of the content posted.


What expedited the change was an issue that occurred in the previous year a disagreement regarding content between social media platform TikTok and Twitter-sponsored ShareChat where the latter had to bring down more than 100 videos from its platform. 

Right now, platforms like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram have certain features and tags through which ads and paid partnerships are displayed. Yet, publicists and advertisers state brands would rather push content through influencers to make it look increasingly organic. 

There is likewise no compulsion or onus on the influencers to highlight that the products and content they are supporting are paid for. 

However, Government authorities said such content, produced by influencers without the contribution of the social media platforms, may in any case not be secured by the most recent clause. This clause will relate to just such non-user produced content in which the platform is in some way involved.

User Accounts and Phone Numbers Exposed; Confirms Instagram


Social Media Giant and Instagram senior, Facebook affirms that a newfound security vulnerability may have put the user data in danger, leaving many open to attack by 'threat actors'.

The vulnerability is said to be so strong to the point that through it the attacker would effectively access 'secure' user data like the users' real names, Instagram account numbers and handles, and full phone numbers.

An Israeli hacker known by the handle @ZHacker13 found the vulnerability with Instagram and said that misusing it would empower an attacker utilizing a multitude of bots and processors to manufacture an accessible/attackable database of users, bypassing protections protecting that information.

The attacker utilizes a simple algorithm against Instagram's login form, checking each phone number in turn for those linked to a live Instagram account, and since there is no restriction on the number of algorithms that can be kept running in parallel, the attacker can do it as many number of times as he wants.


After this while exploiting the advantages of Instagram's Sync Contacts feature he can figure out how to discover the account name and number linked to the phone number.


Anyway as of now, there is no proof that any user data has been misused or mishandled via utilizing this vulnerability—in any case; on the other hand, there is no proof that it hasn't.

Probably the fact that the endeavour required two separate procedures may imply that the attackers have chosen to withdraw.

Meanwhile, @ZHacker13 tested his Instagram exploit post Facebook's fix and affirmed that it no longer worked.

Facebook Dating Service available in 20 countries


Facebook has launched one of its most awaiting features; Facebook dating service in the United States and other 19 countries for its users who are above 18 years or older.

Currently, dating feature would be available in countries including US, Bolivia, Canada, Brazil, Argentina, Singapore, Suriname, Thailand, Laos, Guyana, Ecuador, Chile, Bolivia, Philippines, Mexico, Paraguay, Peru, Columbia,  Vietnam, and Malaysia.

Facebook said that they would launch a dating service in Europe in early 2020. While there is no word when they would launch the service in South East Asia.

"Today people are asked to make a decision as to whether or not they like someone immediately based on a static profile. To help you show, rather than tell, who you are, we're bringing Stories to Dating," Facebook blog post.

The user can create a dating profile, which will be entirely different and separate from the main profile.  People can integrate their Instagram posts in a dating profile, by the end of the year, and they would be able to add Instagram followers to their Secret Crush lists, in addition of their Facebook friends.

"By the end of the year, we'll make it possible to add Facebook and Instagram Stories to your Dating profile too,"  Facebook wrote in a blog post.

The dating service won't match you with your  Facebook friend until you choose to use Secret Crush and your crush too should have added you to their crush list.

"All of your Dating activity will stay in Facebook Dating. It won't be shared to the rest of Facebook," said the company.

"Finding a romantic partner is deeply personal, which is why we built Dating to be safe, inclusive and opt-in. Safety, security and privacy are at the forefront of this product," blog post.

Instagram Users Fall Victim To yet another Phishing Campaign



Instagram user's become victims of a new phishing campaign that utilizes login attempt warnings combined with what resembles the two-factor authentication (2FA) codes to trick potential victims into surrendering over their sensitive data by means of fake sites.

It is believed that they use the 2FA to make the scam increasingly 'believable' and  alongside this they resort to phishing with the assistance of a wide scope of social engineering techniques, just as messages intended to seem as though they're sent by somebody they know or an authentic association.

Here, particularly the attackers utilize fake Instagram login alerts stating that somebody tried to sign in to the target's account, and thusly requesting that they affirm their identity by means of a sign-in page linked within the message.

In order to abstain from raising any suspicions these messages are intended to look as close as conceivable to what official messages might appear coming from Instagram.

Once on the target is redirected to the phisher's landing page, they see a perfectly cloned Instagram login page verified with a legitimate HTTPS certificate and displaying a green padlock to ease any questions regarding whether it's the genuine one or not.


To avoid from falling for an Instagram phishing trick like this one, the users are prescribed to never enter their sign-in certifications if the page requesting that they sign in does not belong to the instagram.com site.

Anyway in the event that the user has had their Instagram credentials stolen in such an attack or had their account hacked but in some way or another can still access it, at that point they should initially check if their right email address and phone number are still associated with the account.

Following this they it is advised that they change the account's password by adhering to specific guidelines given by Instagram.

Be that as it may, assuming unfortunately, that the user has lost access to their account after it being hacked, they can utilize these guidelines or instructions to report the incident to Instagram's security, which will then accordingly re-establish it subsequent to confirming the user's identity through a picture or the email address or phone number you signed up with and the type of device you used at the time of sign up."

Fashion designer lost business after her Instagram account got hacked

Twenty-three-year-old Bree Kotomah almost gave up on a burgeoning career in fashion design when hackers compromised her business's Instagram account in November 2018.

"Unfortunately, at the time I ran everything on Instagram, so when that was gone, that was the whole business gone," she told BBC Radio 5 Live.

At least half of micro businesses - companies with fewer than nine employees - in the UK are victims of cyber-attacks every year, compared to just a third of other companies, according to the Association of Independent Professionals and the Self-Employed (IPSE).

Ms Kotomah, whose business Boresa Kotomah is based in London, had not studied fashion. She taught herself to sew and began designing clothes in 2018. Due to interest on Twitter in her fashion styles, she started an Instagram account and gained 5,000 followers in seven months, after a photo of a dress she made went viral.

Interested customers would send her a direct message on Instagram enquiring about prices, and commission her to make the dresses.

Ms Kotomah would invoice her customers using PayPal and mobile app Invoice2go, and her reputation grew by word of mouth and through shares of her outfits on Instagram and Twitter.

But then it all stuttered to a halt.

"I woke up one morning and my account was deleted. I received an email from Instagram saying I had violated some terms and I had done certain things that I know I didn't do," she said.

"My business at that time was my livelihood. That was what I was doing full-time. I'm self-employed. So if I'm not making money from working, I'm not making money at all so I was just thinking like, 'What am I going to do?'"

Ms Kotomah's designs have been worn by actors, influencers, singers, models and dancers.

Ms Kotomah was so disheartened that she stopped designing for two months and considered other jobs. But then she decided to give it one more try. She started a new Instagram account, learned more about running a business, and set up a website showcasing her work that offered ready-to-wear clothing available for immediate purchase.

Facebook to rename WhatsApp and Instagram






Facebook is planning to rename its two social media platform WhatsApp and Instagram as “WhatsApp from Facebook” and “Instagram from Facebook” respectively.

It came as a shock, as many users still doesn’t know that Facebook own these popular apps.

 Till now, the company allowed both the companies to operate as independent brands. They have their own managers, employess, and even sepearate work places. 

However, in recent times, Facebook has taken steps to make WhatsApp and Instagram less independent. 

“We want to be clearer about the products and services that are part of Facebook,” a spokeswoman, Bertie Thomson of the company said.

According to the report, the new name will be displayed only on the app store pages on both Android and iOS. The new names will also be visible on the login pages. 




Security researcher awarded $30,000 for spotting a privacy bug in Instagram





A security researcher from India has won $30,000 in a bug bounty program after he found a flaw in Facebook-owned photo-sharing app Instagram.

Laxman Muthiyah discovered a vulnerability that allowed him to hack any Instagram account without consent permission."

He took over someone's Instagram account by clicking on forget the password or requesting a recovery code against the account.

"I reported the vulnerability to the Facebook security team and they were unable to reproduce it initially due to lack of information in my report. After a few email and proof of concept video, I could convince them the attack is feasible," Muthiyah wrote in a blog post. 

The company’s security teams fixed the issue and rewarded the researcher $30,000 as a part of their bounty program.

However, a senior technologist at cybersecurity major Sophos, Paul Ducklin, said that the vulnerability found by Muthiyah no longer existed, and users should get back control for their hacked accounts. 


"In case any of your accounts do get taken over, familiarise yourself with the process you'd follow to win them back. In particular, if there are documents or usage history that might help your case, get them ready before you get hacked, not afterward," Ducklin said in a statement.

Instagram account can be easily hacked, finds hacker

A professional hacker discovered what he considered a fairly simple way to seize control of any Instagram user's account. Fortunately for the site's 500 million active daily users, he told Instagram exactly how it could be done.

Laxman Muthiyah is a professional bounty hunter. Not the kind who tracks down bail jumpers, mind you. He uses his hacking skills to collect bug bounties, money companies pay to hackers who find and report vulnerabilities in their software.

Muthiyah found the account-breaking bug in the mobile version of Instagram's password reset system. When a user wants to reset his or her password, Instagram tries to validate their identity by sending a 6-digit code to a recovery phone number.

A six-digit code is child's play for a hacker with any amount of computing power at their disposal, which is why Instagram has a system in place that can detect brute-force attacks. Muthiyah found that out of 1,000 attempts around 75% were blocked.

By creating a race condition -- a nasty situation that occurs when a computer tries to process multiple requests at the same time -- and making attempts from a huge number of IP addresses -- Muthiyah was able to do an end run around Instagram's brute force blocker.

He bombarded Instagram with 200,000 codes from 1,000 different IP addresses. That might sound like a Herculean task, but Muthiyah notes that it's actually quite simple using cloud-based tools.

In his estimation it would have cost about $150 to reset anyone's password.

Gaining control of an account with hundreds of thousands -- or even millions -- of followers is well worth the investment. It provides an opportunity to spam users with links to infected downloads or phishing pages from an account they are likely to trust.

There's no telling how many unsuspecting fans would've blindly clicked a malicious link posted from a celeb's verified IG account. It's quite possible that a major incident was avoided thanks to Muthiyah's hard work and Facebook's (which owns Instagram) rapid deployment of a fix.

Instagram to roll out new features to counter cyberbullying

Bullying. Sadly, it’s a pandemic that is not just restricted to the school grounds of our younger and geekier selves, but something which tends to follow people around regardless of age and even privacy. Cyberbullying has become more widespread than traditional bullying and is often known to be equally traumatic for its victims. A trend which tech companies are trying to increasingly address.

Instagram has new features (via The Verge) on its way that it’s hoping will address cyberbullying by finally allowing people to “shadow ban” others and a new artificial intelligence that is designed to flag potentially offensive comments. Both initiatives are looking to be put into testing soon.

The “shadow ban” will essentially provide a way for a user to restrict another user, without that person realising they are essentially banned. So they will still be able to see your post and comment on them, but their comments will only be visible to themselves meaning you and the rest of the people you actually want to interact with can keep talking in peace while said person wonders why their snarky comments are not getting any responses from you.

Along with this feature, Instagram is also hoping to leverage a new AI to flag potentially offensive comments and ask the commenter if they really want to follow through with posting. They’ll be given the opportunity to undo their comment, and Instagram says that during tests, it encouraged “some” people to reflect on and undo what they wrote. A nice touch, though given the emotional state most bullies are in, it’s unlikely to alter course for most people. Still, it’s better than nothing.

Instagram has already tested multiple bully-focused features, including an offensive comment filter that automatically screens bullying comments that “contain attacks on a person’s appearance or character, as well as threats to a person’s well-being or health” as well as a similar feature for photos and captions. So this shows a real effort by Facebook to tackle this problem on the platform.

Fake Messages on WhatsApp Asks the Users to Pay Money in Order to Continue Using the App




WhatsApp, Facebook, and Instagram suffered a social media outage on 3rd July which affected the users all across the world. As a consequence of the outage, users were not able to access the platforms properly and certain features became dysfunctional. During the outage, a lot of people in India got messages on their WhatsApp telling that the app is down due to over usage and it would be off from 11:30 PM to 6:00 AM every day. The message also asked users to forward the text message to their contacts in order to continue using the app service otherwise their account would be made inaccessible and the app services will no longer be free of charge for them.

The fake message which was circulated on WhatsApp is as follows:

“What's app will b off From 11.30pm to 6:00 am daily Declared by central govt. Message from Narendra Modi (PM) we have had an over usage of user names on WhatsApp Messenger. We are requesting all users to forward this message to their entire contact list. If you do not forward this message, we will take it as your account is invalid and it will be deleted within the next 48 hours. DO NOT ignore my words or whatsapp will no longer recognise your activation. If you wish to re-activate your account after it has been deleted, a charge of 499.00 will be added to your monthly bill. We are also aware of the issue involving the pictures updates not showing. We are working diligently at fixing this problem and it will be up and running as soon as possible. Thank you for your cooperation from the modi team. WhatsApp is going to cost you money soon. The only way that it will stay free is if you are a frequent user i.e. you have at least 50 people you are chatting with. To become a frequent user send this message to 10 people who receive it (2 ticks) and your WhatsApp logo will change color. send this to 8 people to activate the new whatsapp..
Saturday morning whatsapp will become chargeable. If you have at least 10 contacts send them this message. In this way, we will see that you are an avid user and your logo will become blue and will remain free. (As discussed in the paper today. Whatsapp will cost 0.01€ per message. Send this message to 10 people. When you do the light will turn blue otherwise whatsapp will activate billing. ITS TRUE ...... U get blue TICKS"

Likewise, another fake message claimed that WhatsApp has been sold off to Mukesh Ambani and asks users to forward the message to 10 people in order to activate the new WhatsApp along with Facebook services.

The entire message read:
"Dont ignore please read it carefully" Hello, I. Am VARUN PULYANI director of whatsapp, this message is to inform all of our users that we have sold whatsapp to Mukesh Ambani . Reliance for 19 billion $. WhatsApp is now controlled by mukesh Ambani . If you have at least 10 contacts send this sms and logo of your whatsapp will change to a new icon with facebook's "f" within 24 hours.Forward this message to more than 10 people to activate your new whatsapp with Facebook services or else your account will be deleted from new servers.
This is the final notice! Hello everyone, it seems that all the warnings were real, the use of WhatsApp cost money from November 2017. If you send this string to 18 different on your list, your icon will be blue and will be free for you. If you do not believe me see tomorrow at 6 pm ending WhatsApp and have to pay to open it, this is by law This message is to inform all of our users, our servers have recently been very congested, so we are asking you to help us solve this problem. We require our active users to forward this message to each of the people in your contact list to confirm our active users using WhatsApp, if you do not send this message to all your contacts WhatsApp will then start to charge you. Your account will remain inactive with the consequence of losing all your contacts. Message from Jim Balsamic (CEO of Whatsapp ) we have had an over usage of user names on whatsapp Messenger. We are requesting all users to forward this message to their entire contact list. If you do not forward this message, we will take it as your account is invalid and it will be deleted within the next 48 hours. Please DO NOT ignore this message or whatsapp will no longer recognise your activation. If you wish to re-activate your account after it has been deleted, a charge of 25.00 will be added to your monthly bill. We are also aware of the issue involving the pictures updates not showing. We are working diligently at fixing this problem and it will be up and running as soon as possible. Thank you for your cooperation from the Whatsapp team”

Users are advised to not believe such fake messages and avoid spreading the misinformation further by forwarding it to other users.



Global outage affecting Facebook, Instagram, and WhatsApp around the world







Social media services owned by Facebook were down for several hours for users around the world. The outage was affecting the entire ‘family of apps.’
Facebook, Instagram, and WhatsApp faced the outage from the early Morning on Wednesday, some users reported issues in uploading and downloading the images, video and audio files, while some of them faced difficulties in the News Feed. 

Facebook acknowledged the technical glitch and tweeted from their global Twitter handle stating that “We're aware that some people are having trouble uploading or sending images, videos or other files on our apps. We're sorry for the trouble and are working to get things back to normal as quickly as possible." 

The outage affected users across Asia, Europe, USA, and Africa. 

Users vented out their frustration against the three social media website on their Twitter accounts with the hashtags #instagramdown, #facebookdown and #whatsappdown, all of these hashtags were top trends on the site across the world. 

Instagram was forced to issue its own statement on Twitter. "We're sorry for the trouble and are working to get things back to normal as quickly as possible" Instagram tweeted.


Facebook to redesign Messenger, WhatsApp, and Instagram



Facebook is coming up with a series of changes to all its social media networks including Instagram and Whatsapp.

According to its boss Mark Zuckerberg the new designs and features will focus on privacy first. The company decided to change its apps after facing widespread criticism for handling users data.

"We don’t exactly have the strongest reputation on privacy right now, to put it lightly," Zuckerberg said.

Here is list of changes in the app:

  • All the messages sent via Messenger will be end-to-end encrypted by default, and the platform will be fully integrated with WhatsApp
  • Instagram will hide like counts, but not the account owner
  • A WhatsApp secure payment service would be introduced in other countries later this year.
  • The Facebook app is being redesigned to make community groups central to the newsfeed - and the distinctive blue branding is going. The redesign is rolling out in the US and then more widely straight away.
  • Users will be able to post text, stickers or drawings on their Instagram post rather than starting it with a photo or a video. 

Other than this, Facebook has introduced a new feature called Secret Crush, which is a part of Facebook Dating. This feature will let Facebook members to tag up to nine of their crushes. 

If the recipient of the crush is also using the feature and nominates them as well, then both parties will receive a message to say they have matched.

Facebook Dating will roll out in 14 new countries, but will not be available in Europe or the US.


Facebook leaks millions of Instagram passwords

2018 – What a year was it for Facebook! Data scandals and security leaks, issues from Cambridge Analytica and trails by authorities, Facebook have gone under every shit it’s connected with.

And the problems just keep coming in 2019. And in this year, it seemed to have enough already by internal probs, where is announced in a blog post last month saying, “Millions of users passwords were stored in a readable format in their databases!”

Just a day after the social networking giant admitted that it "unintentionally" uploaded email contacts of nearly 1.5 million of new users, Facebook has now revealed that it exposed millions of Instagram users' passwords in a data-security lapse. The password exposure is part of the security breach that was first reported last month by Krebs on Security. Admitting the security blunder, Facebook has said that the company it stored passwords of millions of users in plain text on its internal servers.

However, at that time Facebook claimed that “hundreds of millions of Facebook Lite users” and “tens of millions of other Facebook users” have been affected. Incidentally, the company has chosen just to update the old blog post while making the new revelation. "This is an issue that has already been widely reported, but we want to be clear that we simply learned there were more passwords stored in this way," a Facebook spokesperson said in a statement. Here's all you need to know about this latest 'password leak' from Facebook ...

The process was unintentional – according to Facebook – and happened when users were prompted for their password as part of a security verification process. It's been going on since May 2016 but Facebook says its now deleting all the scraped data.

In the updated post Facebook says: We will be notifying these users as we did the others.

Instagram bug showed stories of strangers






A bug on Instagram has affected the story tray which shows stories from people the users’ follow, but this bug has violated the privacy policy for some of the users’ by displaying the stories from people whom they don’t even follow. 

The Facebook owned company confirmed the existence of the technical glitch to TechCrunch, in the meantime they claimed that the glitch was resolved in a few hours.

According to the company, the bug "caused a small number of people's Instagram Stories trays to show accounts they don't follow." 

It did not displayed the full stories if the accounts were private, but it showed the whole stories if the accounts were public. 

The company believes that only small portion of the users’ were impacted by this glitch. However, there are nearly 500 million users’, and even the small fraction of affected users’ could have a great impact. 

A Twitter @internetryan drew everyone’s attention when he first reported the problem on the social tweeting about the bug,  'Hey @Instagram/@facebook, people who I don't follow (with private accounts) are showing up in my Stories.’


Mark Zuckerberg's Previous Facebook Posts Deleted, the Company Blames Technical Errors


The public posts made by Facebook’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg on his personal Facebook profile have been deleted; it included some of the critical updates and important announcements made by the company. All the information shared by Zuckerberg in the year 2007 and 2008 has also vanished.
On being enquired, a spokesperson of Facebook said that these posts which included the major announcements like the one regarding the acquisition of Instagram were erased mistakenly because of some technical errors. Another crucial announcement which was disappeared is Zuckerberg’s promise to keep Instagram free from Facebook.
However, today Instagram is integrated more closely by Facebook than what was said to be. The matter is reported to be escalated to an extent that it led two of Instagram’s co-founders to resign last year.

The deletion of the post where Mark pledged to build and grow Instagram separately is the highlight as Zuckerberg seemingly did not abide by it. 

'Every day, we make decisions about what speech is harmful, what constitutes political advertising, and how to prevent sophisticated cyber attacks.’ Zuckerberg told to The Washington Post.

'These are important for keeping our community safe. But if we were starting from scratch, we wouldn't ask companies to make these judgments alone,' he added.

Referencing from the statements given to Business insider by Facebook’s spokesperson, 'A few years ago some of Mark's posts were mistakenly deleted due to technical errors. The work required to restore them would have been extensive and not guaranteed to be successful so we didn't do it,'

'We agree people should be able to find information about past announcements and major company news, which is why for years we've shared and archived this information publicly — first on our blog and in recent years on our Newsroom.’


Facebook Exposes Passwords of Hundreds of Millions of Its Users



A rather shocking vulnerability was uncovered by security researcher Brian Krebs, who reports that Facebook left the passwords of approximately 200 to 600 million users simply ‘stored’ in plain text.

A huge number of Facebook, Facebook Lite, and Instagram users may have had their passwords exposed as the aftereffect of a disturbing oversight by the social networking company.

Facebook just previously learned of the issue this past January and has since affirmed the shocking security failure, yet persists it has fixed the issue and has not discovered any proof that the data was 'abused.'

Albeit all users whose passwords were exposed will be informed, the 'shocking flaw' comes so far another blow to the already melting away trust of numerous Facebook users in the midst of the two years of consecutive privacy scandals.

The firm is as yet attempting to decide precisely the exact number of passwords which were exposed and to what extent, assures a source at Facebook who cautioned Krebs of the issue in the first place.

 ‘It’s so far unclear what caused some users’ passwords to be left exposed. To be clear, these passwords were never visible to anyone outside of Facebook and we have found no evidence to date that anyone internally abused or improperly accessed them, we estimate that we will notify hundreds of millions of Facebook Lite users, tens of millions of other Facebook users, and tens of thousands of Instagram users.'
            - Facebook released a public statement with Krebs' report and affirms that it revealed the plain text passwords amid a standard security review in January.

In any case while Facebook says no password reset is as such required, it will caution the users if their information has been abused or will be abused in any way, the security experts still recommend the users to change their current passwords.