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Showing posts with label Identity Theft. Show all posts

Wishbone Breach: Hacker Leaks Personal Data of 40 Million Users


Personal data of 40 million users registered on Wishbone has been published online by hackers, it included user details like usernames, contact numbers, email addresses, Facebook and Twitter access tokens, DOBs, location, gender, and MD5 hashed passwords. Researchers have confirmed the authenticity of the data that has found to be accurate – belonging to the users who have used the app. It could be used by attackers to carry out various malicious activities such as phishing campaigns, identify thefts, credential stuffing attacks, and account takeovers.

Wishbone is a mobile survey app that provides users a social platform to compare social content, the app hasn't disclosed its total user count in recent times, Wishbone has been enlisted as one of top 50 most popular social networking apps in iOS App Store for years now, also making it to the top 10 in its prime.

This breach came as the second-largest security incident in the last three years for the app, earlier in 2017, hackers breached around 2.2 million email addresses and 287,000 phone numbers. It mainly contained kids' personal details. However, the recent breach mainly consists of numbers belonging to young women.

According to the reports, the database was circulating secretly since March, it has been put up for sale on dark web forums for thousands of dollars. Later, 'ShinyHunters', a dark web trader who allegedly leaked the data, stated that they will be publishing the data for free after individuals began reselling it.

While commenting on the matter, senior vice president of data security specialists comforte AG, Mark Bower said, “It looks like security and privacy have been an afterthought, not a matter of culture and software development process. If the passwords are hashed with MD5, then the users affected should be immediately making sure their ID’s and passwords aren’t used elsewhere with the same password. MD5 is a goner as far as security is concerned but used by mistaken developers unfamiliar with its security risks or using older code libraries using MD5. Hashed MD5 passwords aren’t difficult to brute force. The bigger issue here is the personal data though – so now attackers have a bunch more data for social engineering.”

Security experts have recommended Wishbone users to update or change their passwords and stay wary of any suspicious activity in their account.

Canada Cybersecurity: Health Care Industry Battles Cyberattacks as Experts Call-in Federal Support


Canada's hospitals and clinics are suffering massive cyber threats as the cyberattacks targeting the Canadian healthcare industry saw a sudden rise in number.

Researchers reported that the health-care sector is the most targeted sector in Canada amounting to a total of 48% of all security breaches in the country. Digital security of hospitals in Canada is being exposed to heavy risk as the growing number of data-breach incidents imply how the healthcare industry has become the new favorite of cybercriminals.

The issue has gained widespread attention that led to calls for imposing national cybersecurity standards on the healthcare industry. In order to tackle the problem effectively and protect the privacy of their patients, the institutions are required to update their cybersecurity arsenal for which the federal government's involvement is deemed necessary by the experts.

While commenting on the matter, Paul-Émile Cloutier, the president and CEO of HealthcareCAN, said: "My biggest disappointment at this moment is that it seems that anything that has to do with the health sector and cybersecurity is falling between the cracks at the federal level."

Cybersecurity experts expressed their concern in regard and put into perspective the current inability of the Canadian health system to cope up with the increasing risk.

Experts believe that information regarding a person's health can potentially be of more value to the cybercrime space than credit card data itself for an individual's health care identity contains data with unique values that remains the same over time such as the individual's health number or DOB, it assists hackers in stealing identities by making the process smooth.

Over the past year, various Canadian health-care institutions became victim of breaches including LifeLabs, one of the country's largest medical laboratory of diagnostic testing for healthcare, which was hit by a massive cyberattack compromising the health data of around 15 million Canadians. The private provider was forced to pay a ransom in order to retrieve the stolen customer data.

In another incident, attackers breached the computer networks of three hospitals in Ontario that led to a temporary shut down of diagnostic clinics and non-emergency cases were told to come back later.

2 New Android Malwares on The Hunt to Gain Control of User’s Account



As per discoveries of competent security software two new Android malware is on the hunt to 'discreetly' access control of the victim's account so as to send different ill-intentioned content. The two malware together steal cookies collected by the browser as well as applications of famous social networking sites and accordingly making things easier for the thieves to do their job. 

While cookies are frequently perceived as quite harmless since they are characterized as small bits of data collected by websites to smoothly track user activity online with an end goal to create customized settings for them in the future however in a wring hands, they represent a serious security hazard. A grave security risk since, when websites store these cookies, they utilize a unique session ID that recognizes the user later on without having them to enter a password or login again. 

Once possessing a user's ID, swindlers can trick the websites into assuming that they are in fact the person in question and thusly take control of the latter's account. What's more, that is actually what these cookie thieves did, as described by computer security software major Kaspersky, creating Trojans with comparable coding constrained by a similar command and control (C&C) server. 

The primary Trojan obtains root rights on the victim's device, which permits the thieves to transfer Facebook's cookies to their own servers. Be that as it may, in many cases, just having the ID number isn't sufficient to assume control for another's account. A few sites have safety measures set up that forestalls suspicious log-in endeavors as well. 

Here is when the second Trojan comes in. This malignant application can run a proxy server on a victim's device to sidestep the security measures, obtaining access without raising any doubt. From that point onwards, the thieves can act as the 'person in question' and assume control for their social media accounts to circulate undesirable content. While a definitive aim of the cookie thieves remains rather obscure, a page revealed on the same C&C server could provide a clue: the page promotes services for distributing spam on social networks and messengers. 

In simpler words, the thieves might be looking for account access as an approach to dispatch widespread spam and phishing attacks. 

Malware analyst Igor Golovin says "By combining two attacks, the cookie thieves have discovered a way to gain control over their victims` account without arising suspicions. While this is a relatively new threat -- so far, only about 1,000 individuals have been targeted -- that number is growing and will most likely continue to do so, particularly since it`s so hard for websites to detect." 

He adds later "Even though we typically don`t pay attention to cookies when we`re surfing the web, they`re still another means of processing our personal information, and anytime data about us is collected online, we need to pay attention." 

According to Kaspersky experts all hope’s isn’t lost they made certain recommendations which might help a user to save themselves from becoming a victim of cookie theft : - 
  1. Block third-party cookie access on your phone`s web browser and only let your data be saved until you quit the browser
  2. Periodically clear your cookies
  3. Use a reliable security solution that includes a private browsing feature, which prevents websites from collecting information about your activity online.

Estonian hackers forged electronic identity card


As we all know, the introduction of electronic Identity Card has begun in many developed countries. According to the leaders of the States, this allows citizens to receive a large number of services without long standing in queues, as it only requires the availability of the Internet.

Estonian citizens can use about 600 different online services, and 2.4 thousand more services are offered to businesses. An electronic ID allows you to remotely sign documents, pay for cellular communication, use transport, etc.

Another important advantage of electronic identity cards is that they cannot be faked. This is very important for the security of States. Leading experts on cybersecurity argue that such electronic documents are highly reliable. But, as it turned out, this statement is incorrect.

Recently it became known that Estonian hackers were able to fake an electronic ID. The Estonian socio-political daily newspaper Postimees reported the incident.

In February 2019 some Estonian residents began to receive SMS messages from one of the largest Banks in the country. The message offered to update their personal information by clicking on the link which led to a page visually similar to the home page of the Bank. There, users had to log in using their Mobile Electronic Identity Card (Mobile ID) by entering two codes. These two codes were enough to fake the identity of the victims. The scammers created new accounts in the Smart-ID application, which allows them to connect to services in Estonia.

It’s important to note that Smart-ID application allows people to use various services including managing Bank accounts. In total, 2.2 million people are using this app, including 433 thousand in Estonia. However, the damage caused to Estonians is only 1000 Euros.

It should be noted that the last failure in the Mobile-ID was recorded in May, when users could not make money transfers and use other services for several hours. However, there were no cases of identity forgery before.

The introduction of electronic passports is also planned in Russia. It is known that such innovation may appear in the Russian Federation no earlier than 2021.

US charges Russians for interfering in 2016 Elections, Identity theft in the centre

On Friday, Special Counsel Robert Mueller charged against 13 Russian nationals and three Russian groups for interfering with the 2016 U.S. elections.

The charges included creation of false U.S. identities as well as identity theft of six U.S. residents. The charges of identity theft were brought against four Russian nationals.

According to the indictment, the Russian nationals used stolen Social Security numbers, home addresses, and birth dates of the six persons to open bank and PayPal accounts and obtain fake government documents between June 2016 and May 2017.

“This indictment serves as a reminder that people are not always who they appear to be on the Internet,” Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein said at a press briefing announcing the indictments.

The Russians allegedly used the stolen identities to open four accounts at an undisclosed U.S. bank and purchased more than a dozen bank account numbers from online sellers.

The stolen information was also allegedly used to evade PayPal security measures.

“We work closely with law enforcement, and did so in this matter, to identify, investigate and stop improper or potentially illegal activity,” PayPal said in a statement.

The Russians are claimed to have used the accounts to pay for the promotion of politically inflammatory social media posts, IRA expenses, political rallies and political props including banners, buttons and flags, in efforts to boost President Trump’s campaign, and are alleged to have been paid $25 to $50 per post from U.S. persons to promote content on IRA-controlled Facebook and Twitter accounts.