Zwift hackers expose next generation of cycling doping


Cyber security experts proved they can hack into Zwift and boost their performance on the indoor cycling gaming platform.

The hack works by intercepting and manipulating data sent between smart trainers and Zwift.

It underscores the need to tighten security in e-racing, a growing field with UCI-sanctioned events and Olympic ambitions.

By his own admission, cyber security consultant Brad Dixon is a bit of a cycling hack. He rides his bike for fitness and recreation, but he’s better at cracking computer codes than cranking out pro-level wattage on two wheels.

Dixon’s lack of high-end fitness might keep him off the podium IRL, but his ability to game virtual reality could help him rise through the ranks in the ever-growing arena of e-sports, where cyclists compete, often for actual cash and real-world prizes, on stationary trainers via platforms like Zwift.

Last month, Dixon gave a 40-minute presentation at DEF CON, a popular computer security conference, called Cheating in eSports: How to Cheat at Virtual Cycling Using USB Hacks. He detailed how, with some standard hardware and an Xbox controller, he tricked the system into thinking he was humming around Watopia at race pace while doing nothing more strenuous than cracking open a beer.

“The game limits you to 2,000 watts of power, but for a recreational rider like me, that’s infinity,” said Dixon, who works at the New York-based consulting firm Carve Systems. “I can easily cruise around at 30-40 mph in the game at those watts, if not more.”

Such high speeds might immediately cause suspicion among anyone getting their Zwift kit blown off by a pixelated competitor. But smaller boosts, like a 5-10 watt gain here or there—enough to beat someone up a climb or to the line for a sprint—would be far less noticeable.

In the end, these numbers are all that determine how quickly your little cartoon cyclist pedals around the island. And numbers are exactly what gave Carve Systems CEO Mike Zusman, a former Cat 1 mountain bike racer, the notion for this particular hack.

These legit looking iPhone cables allow hackers to take charge of your computer

When they said you should be wary of third-party accessories and unbranded cables for charging your smartphone, they were serious. And the latest example of what a cable that isn’t original can do, should be enough to scare you. There is apparently a Lightning Cable that looks just as harmless as an iPhone cable should. But it has a nasty trick up its sleeve, which allows a hacker to take control of your computer, the moment you plug this in to the USB port. This cable has been dubbed the OMGCable.

A security researcher with the Twitter handle @_MG_ took a typical USB to Lightning cable and added a Wi-Fi implant to it. The moment this gets plugged into the USB port on a PC, a hacker sitting nearby with access to the Wi-Fi module hidden inside the cable can run a malicious code and take charge of a PC or remotely access data without the user even noticing.

“This specific Lightning cable allows for cross-platform attack payloads, and the implant I have created is easily adapted to other USB cable types. Apple just happens to be the most difficult to implant, so it was a good proof of capabilities,” said MG, as reported by the TechCrunch website.

The thing with phone charging cables is that no one really gives them a second look. You see one, you plug it in and you let it be. At the same time, a lot of users are wary about using USB drives, also known as pen drives or thumb drives, because they are popular as carriers of malware and viruses that can pretty much ruin your PC.

Vulnerability in allows hackers to steal private pictures from digital cameras




The International Imaging Industry Association has devised a 'standardised protocol' known as  Picture Transfer Protocol  (PTP) to move digital pictures from camera to PC seeing as Modern Cameras which connect with a PC by means of USB or WiFi systems are said to have been vulnerable against ransomware and malware attacks.

A research report from Check Point Research ascribes the danger to Picture Transfer Protocol (PTP) used to transfer digital pictures from camera to PC.

For their research, Check Point utilized Canon's EOS 80D DSLR camera which supports both USB and WiFi, and basic vulnerabilities in the PTP were found. Given that the protocol is standardized and installed in other camera brands, it is reasonable for expect that comparable vulnerabilities can be found in cameras from different sellers too.

The transfer protocol was at first centered around picture transfer, but it evolved further to incorporate many various commands that support anything from taking a live picture to overhauling the camera's firmware.

Eyal Itkin, Security Researcher, Check Point Software Technologies says that, “Any ‘smart’ device, including the DSLR camera, is susceptible to attacks; cameras are no longer just connected to the USB, but to the WiFi network and its surrounding environment. This makes them more vulnerable to threats as attackers can inject ransomware into both the camera and PC it is connected to. The photos could end up being held hostage until the user pays the ransom for them to be released.”

Here are some important measures the camera owners can take in order to avoid being infected:

  • Ensure your camera is utilizing the most recent firmware version, and install a patch if available.
  • Turn off the camera's WiFi when not being used
  • When utilizing Wi-Fi, take a stab at utilizing the camera as the Wi-Fi___33 access point (basically, design the camera to go about as a Wi-Fi hotspot), instead of connecting your camera to an open Wi-Fi network.



Your home wi-fi isn't safe: Hackers know router trick to access bank accounts, card details

Next time when you connect smartphone or a laptop to relatively secure home Wi-Fi, you might actually be surprised how easy it is to hack into your home Wi-Fi network, courtesy that router installed by your Internet Service Provider (ISP). A small vulnerability in the home Wi-Fi network can give a criminal access to almost all the devices that access that Wi-Fi. This could spell trouble for bank accounts, credit card details, child safety and a whole lot of other concerns.

Trouble could come in the form of a neighbourhood kid who piggybacks on your Internet service. While he plays video games online and talks to his friends over VOIP (Internet-based) telephone service, your Internet service may become sluggish.

But an unsecured home wireless system can also be used to commit crime.

According to the US Department of Justice, law enforcement officers will come knocking on your door if someone uses your Internet connection to upload or download child pornography.

And the bad guys don't have to live next door. Powerful Wi-Fi antennas can pull in a home network's signal from as far away as over 4 kms.

According to Finnish cyber security firm F-Secure, for very little money, a hacker can rent a Cloud-enabled computer and guess your network's password in minutes by brute force or using the powerful computer to try many combinations of your password.

The US Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT) recently issued an alert about Russia-sponsored hackers carrying out attacks against a large number of home routers in the U.S.

According to Sanjay Katkar, Joint Managing Director and CTO, Quick Heal Technologies, cyber criminals are known to exploit vulnerabilities in home Wi-Fi routers by delivering a payload.

"Once infected with the malware, the router can perform various malicious activities like redirecting the user to fake websites when visiting banking or other e-commerce sites," Katkar told IANS recently.

The Ukrainian Security Service and the FBI eliminated a powerful hacker group


Previously, Ehacking News reported that on July 16, it became known that the Ukrainian Security Service and the FBI detained hackers controlling 40% of the Darknet. Since 2007, members of the group have provided hackers and criminals from around the world access through Ukrainian networks in the Darknet.

Intelligence service established that the organizer of the group is the citizen of Ukraine, a resident of Odessa Mikhail Rytikov (Titov). He got serious about hacking in Moscow in the mid-2000s. In 2007, he began to provide services to hackers around the world through Ukrainian networks, carefully hiding the actual location of his equipment. From time to time, Ukrainian, Russian, and American law enforcement officers found the equipment, confiscated it, but the hacker group soon resumed its activities.

It turned out that about 10 accomplices were under command of Ukrainian hacker, as well as dozens of intermediaries in different countries and thousands of customers. Among them, for example, Eugene Bogachev, the developer of the virus ZeuS, who is wanted by the FBI.

It is established that Rytikov sold his services through closed hacker forums and specialized web resources, claiming that his server equipment is located in data centers in Lebanon, Iraq, Iran, Germany, Panama, the Netherlands, Belize, Russia. In fact, the equipment was located near Odessa, in one of the unfinished houses. The room was equipped with secret telecommunication channels and even had its own elevator.

“Nearly one hundred and fifty servers were seized during the authorized investigative actions on the territory of a private house with a hidden data center with a backup autonomous power supply, security and powerful Internet access channels. Thousands of hacker resources were placed on them, some remained encrypted, many were set up in such a way as not to keep traces of criminal activity”, said the acting Head of the Cyber Security Department of SBU (the Ukrainian Security Service) Nikolay Kuleshov.

According to law enforcement officers, they seized 146 servers for hundreds of terabytes of illegal information. The total cost of the equipment, a powerful electric generator, construction and home improvement, agreements with power engineers on a dedicated electric line is estimated at 700 thousand dollars. Only one generator could cost about 150 thousand dollars. The data center could work for a long time even in the absence of electricity.

It’s interesting to note that among the crimes committed with the participation of Rytikov, law enforcement officers distinguish the spread of malicious software ZeuS, which was used to steal financial, the case of hacking the NASDAQ exchange, called "the greatest fraudulent scheme of this type ever implemented in the United States."

Flaws in LTE can allow hackers to spoof presidential alerts


Last year, the United States performed the first public test of the national Wireless Emergency Alert (WEA), an alert system designed to send messages to smartphones, TVs, and other systems simultaneously. The test was specifically for the 'Presidential Alert,' a new category that can't be opted out of (like AMBER alerts). It turns out these types of alerts can be easily spoofed, thanks to various security vulnerabilities with LTE towers.

Researchers figured out a way to exploit the system that sends presidential emergency alerts to our phones, simulating their method on a 50,000 seat football stadium in Colorado with a 90 percent success rate.

A group of researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder released a paper that details how Presidential Alerts can be faked. An attack using a commercially-available radio and various open-source software tools can create an alert with a custom message.

Why it matters: The Wireless Emergency Alert (WEA) system is meant to allow the president to promptly broadcast alert messages to the entire connected US population in case of a nationwide emergency. It can also send out bad weather or AMBER alerts to notify citizens in a particular region or locality, thus making its operation critical. However, the exploitation of LTE networks used in it can enable the transmission of spoofed messages that can cause wide spread of misinformation and panic among the masses.

The researchers didn’t perform an actual attack on a live crowd at the stadium or on actual mobile devices, Eric Wustrow, a researcher on the paper, told Gizmodo in an email. The tests performed were instead done in isolated RF shield boxes, Wustrow said, “and our analysis of Folsom Field was a combination of empirically gathered data and simulation.”

First, alerts come from a specific LTE channel, so malicious alerts can be sent out once that channel is identified. Second, phones have no way of knowing if an alert is genuine or not. Adding digital signatures to alerts could potentially solve the latter problem, but the task would require device manufacturers, carriers, and government agencies to work together.

Targeted Surveillance Attack on Whatsapp





The Facebook owned entity was recently a target of the hackers who had the option to remotely install surveillance softwares on phones and different devices utilizing a rather major vulnerability in the messaging app.

The attack incorporated of attackers utilizing WhatsApp's voice calling function to ring a target's device and regardless of whether the call was not received or not, the surveillance software could be installed. As per the Financial Times report which also speculates that the surveillance software included was created by an Israeli firm NSO Group, the call would frequently disappear from the device’s call log.

WhatsApp told the BBC its security team was the first to recognize the flaw. It imparted that info with human rights groups, chose the security vendors and the US Department of Justice prior this month.

"The attack has all the hallmarks of a private company reportedly that works with governments to deliver spyware that takes over the functions of mobile phone operating systems,” the company said on Monday in a briefing document note for journalists.

WhatsApp said it was too soon to realize what number of users had been affected by the vulnerability, in spite of the fact that it included that the suspected attacks were exceptionally focused on. As indicated by the New York Times, one of the general populations targeted on was a London-based lawyer associated with a claim against the NSO Group.

Although a fix was “rolled out “on Friday, on Monday, WhatsApp requested the majority of its 1.5 billion users to update their applications as an additional precautionary measure.

How to update WhatsApp?

Android
  1. Open the Google Play store
  2. Tap the menu at the top left of the screen
  3. Tap My Apps & Games
  4. If WhatsApp has recently been updated, it will appear in the list of apps with a button that says Open
  5. If WhatsApp has not been automatically updated, the button will say Update. Tap Update to install the new version
  6. The latest version of WhatsApp on Android is 2.19.134

iOS
  1. Open the App Store
  2. At the bottom of the screen, tap Updates
  3. If WhatsApp has recently been updated, it will appear in the list of apps with a button that says Open
  4. If WhatsApp has not been automatically updated, the button will say Update. Tap Update to install the new version
  5. The latest version of WhatsApp on iOS is 2.19.51



Hackers charged with stealing $ 2.4 million



A group of hackers from the cybercrime group known as “The Community” charged in the U.S for “Sim Hijacking” attack and commit wire fraud along with 3 former employees of mobile phone providers.

All the 6 members of “The community ” group alleged to have participated in thefts of victims’ identities and used the data to steal cryptocurrencies via SIM Hijacking attack also known as SIM Swapping.

“SIM Hijacking” or “SIM Swapping” is an identity theft technique that exploits a common cyber-security weakness – mobile phone numbers.

This special technique used by hackers to gain control of victims’ mobile phone number in order to route the victims mobile traffic such as phone calls and short message service (“SMS”) messages through the devices controlled by “The Community”.

According to the fifteen-count indictment unsealed, SIM Hijacking was accomplished by a member of “The Community” contacting a mobile phone provider’s customer service—posing as the victim—and requesting that the victim’s phone number be swapped to a SIM card (and thus a mobile device) controlled by “The Community”. Later, Hijacked new SIM will be used as a gateway to gain control of online accounts such as a victim’s email, cloud storage, and cryptocurrency exchange accounts.

Here is the list of 6 “The Community” 3 former employee of mobile phone provider.

Conor Freeman, 20, of Dublin, Ireland

Ricky Handschumacher, 25 of Pasco County, Florida

Colton Jurisic, 20 of, Dubuque, Iowa

Reyad Gafar Abbas, 19, of Rochester, New York

Garrett Endicott, 21, of Warrensburg, Missouri

Ryan Stevenson, 26, of West Haven, Connecticut

Charged in the criminal complaint were:

Jarratt White, 22 of Tucson, Arizona

Robert Jack, 22of Tucson, Arizona

Fendley Joseph, 28, of Murrietta, California

Cryptocurrency exchanges losses $40 million to hackers




A cryptocurrency exchange Binance reported a ‘’large scale’’ data breach in which hackers managed to steal 7,000 bitcoins worth of about $40 million.

The company said that hackers used various techniques including phishing, viruses and other attacks to obtain large numbers of user API keys, 2FA codes and other info. 

“The hackers had the patience to wait, and execute well-prepared actions through multiple seemingly independent accounts at the most opportune time. The transaction is structured in a way that passed our existing security checks,” said Binance’s CEO, Changing Zhao.

According to the initial investigation, the hacker attacked through multiple seemingly independent accounts at the most opportune time. 

The company has halted all the withdrawals immediately after the reports of hack. 

In a public statement released by the company,  they admitted that, ’’the transaction is structured in a way that passed our existing security checks. It was unfortunate that we were not able to block this withdrawal before it was executed. Once executed, the withdrawal triggered various alarms in our system.’’

They further added that they need to conduct a thorough security review, and it would include all parts of our systems and data, which might take one week. 

However, till the whole time, deposits and withdrawals will ‘’REMAIN SUSPENDED’’. 







Tesla Gives Away EV-Maker Model 3 Cars Along With a Hefty Cash Prize to Hackers



Amat Cama and Richard Zhu a team of hackers, who took part in the Pwn2Own 2019 hacking competition, organized by Trend Micro's "Zero Day Initiative (ZDI)" and exposed vulnerability in the vehicle's framework and bagged themselves an Electric Vehicle (EV) - maker Tesla Model 3 cars along with a cash prize of $35,000.

The hackers focused on the infotainment framework on the Tesla Model 3 and utilized a "JIT bug in the renderer" in order to take control of the framework.

In the course of recent years as a part of Tesla's bug bounty program, the company had given away thousands of dollars in remunerations to those hackers who successfully uncovered vulnerabilities in its frameworks and the EV maker was ' fairly quick ' to fix those vulnerabilities uncovered by white hat hackers.

David Lau, Vice President of Vehicle Software at Tesla says, "Since launching our bug bounty programme in 2014, we have continuously increased our investments into partnerships with security researchers to ensure that all Tesla owners constantly benefit from the brightest minds in the community,"

He further adds, “We develop our cars with the highest standards of safety in every respect, and our work with the security research community is invaluable to us. Since launching our bug bounty program in 2014 – the first to include a connected consumer vehicle– we have continuously increased our investments into partnerships with security researchers to ensure that all Tesla owners constantly benefit from the brightest minds in the community. We look forward to learning about, and rewarding, great work in Pwn2Own so that we can continue to improve our products and our approach to designing inherently secure systems,”



Citrix Discloses Data Breach By International Cyber Criminals


An enormous data breach by "international cyber criminals" of the famous enterprise software company Citrix was unveiled a weekend ago, reporting the breach of its internal network.

The software company which is known to provide its services, especially to the U.S. military, the FBI, numerous U.S. organizations, and different U.S. government offices was cautioned by the FBI of foreign hackers compromising its IT systems and sneak "business documents," likewise including that the company did not know exactly which records and documents the hackers acquired nor how they even got in, in the first place.

In a blog post Citrix says that, “While not confirmed, the FBI has advised that the hackers likely used a tactic known as password spraying, a technique that exploits weak passwords. Once they gained a foothold with limited access, they worked to circumvent additional layers of security...”
"Password spraying” is an attack where the attackers surmise weak passwords to pick up an early toehold in the company's system in order to launch more extensive attacks.

The enormous data breach at Citrix has been distinguished as a part of "a sophisticated cyber espionage campaign supported by nation-state due to strong targeting on government, military-industrial complex, energy companies, financial institutions and large enterprises involved in critical areas of the economy," said Rescurity, an infosec firm in a blog post.

The researchers at Resecurity shed all the more light on the episode when Citrix refused to disclose the numerous insights regarding the breach, guaranteeing that it had prior cautioned the Feds and Citrix about the "targeted attack and data breach."

In spite of the fact that Resecurity says that the Iranian-backed IRIDIUM hacker group hit Citrix in December a year ago and yet again on Monday i.e. the 4th of March and purportedly stole approximately 6 terabytes of sensitive internal files including messages, emails, blueprints and various other documents as well.

While this Florida-based company focused on the fact that there was no sign that the hackers bargained any Citrix product or service, and that it propelled a "forensic investigation," procured the best cyber security company, and took "actions" to skilfully secure its internal network.


Since the consequences of the Citrix 'security incident' are grave and they could influence a more extensive scope of targets, as the company holds sensitive data on other companies as well, including critical infrastructure, government and enterprises, therefore,  strict measures will be thusly taken to secure it inside-out.


Malware Attack Compromises Titan’s System and Steals Customer Data


Titan Manufacturing and Distribution  Inc. and its computer framework was reported to be compromised by a malware that too for about a year around from November 23, 2017 until October 25, 2018 as per an IT security expert.

Given the fact that the company expressed that it doesn't store customer data, the malware installed in the company's framework could have gained access to the users' shopping cart including their data, for example, the users' full names, billing addresses, contact numbers, payment card details, like the card numbers, termination dates, as well as verification codes.

After finding out about the episode, Titan advised its customers about the occurrence and unveiled in a notice for the customers who have had purchased products from its online stores between November 23, 2017 and October 25, 2018, that they might have been influenced by the said incident.

 “Titan Manufacturing and Distributing, Inc. (“Titan”) values your business and recognizes the importance of the security of your information. For these reasons, we are writing to let you know, as a precautionary measure, that Titan has been the victim of a data security incident that may involve your information,” the notice read.

Titan is now working intimately with a 'third-party' IT security expert so as to research and investigate the incident carefully and is all set to provide one-year complimentary identity theft protection for all conceivably influenced customers.

By finding a way to upgrade their security framework and moving its computer framework to another server, deleting and resetting all authoritative login credentials the company has additionally asked for its users to remain cautious by frequently monitoring their financial records for any suspicious exercises and take immediate measures by reporting them.