Search This Blog

Showing posts with label Google Chrome. Show all posts

Mobile Versions of Several Browsers Found Vulnerable to Address Bar Spoofing Flaws

 

Several mobile browsers including Firefox, Chrome, and Safari were found vulnerable to an ‘address bar spoofing’ flaw which when exploited could allow a threat actor to disguise a URL and make his phishing page appear like a legitimate website, according to a report published by cybersecurity company Rapid7 which reportedly worked in collaboration with Rafay Baloch - an independent security researcher who disclosed ten new URL spoofing vulnerabilities in seven browsers. 
 
The browsers were informed about the issues in August as the vulnerabilities surfaced earlier this year; some of the vendors took preventive measures - patching the issues beforehand while others left their browsers vulnerable to the threat. 
 
Notably, the Firefox browser for Android has already been fixed by Mozilla, and for those who haven’t updated it yet make sure you do it now. While Google’s Chrome Browser on both Android and iOS is still vulnerable to the threat and is unlikely to be patched until September. Other affected browsers include Opera Touch, UC Browser, Yandex Browser, RITS Browser, and Bolt Browser. 

In order to execute an address bar spoofing attack, the attacker alters the URL which is displayed onto the address bar of the compromised web browser which is configured to trick victims into believing that the website they are browsing is monitored by an authenticated source. However, in reality, the website would be controlled by the attackers carrying out the spoofing attack. The attacker can trick his victims into providing their login details or other personal information by making them think as they are connected to a website like Paypal.com. 
 
“Exploitation all comes down to, "Javascript shenanigans." By messing with the timing between page loads and when the browser gets a chance to refresh the address bar, an attacker can cause either a pop-up to appear to come from an arbitrary website or can render content in the browser window that falsely appears to come from an arbitrary website”, the report explained. 
 
“With ever-growing sophistication of spear-phishing attacks, exploitation of browser-based vulnerabilities such as address bar spoofing may exacerbate the success of spear-phishing attacks and hence prove to be very lethal,” Baloch further told.

Google Confirms Two New High-Severity Vulnerabilities in Chrome 81


The new Chrome 81 version released on April 7th by Google for Windows, Mac, and Linux primarily focused on security owing to the vulnerability users are subjected to due to the coronavirus pandemic. The launch of the update was delayed for similar reasons. It brought along new features, bug fixes, and over 30 security flaw patches from Google's security researchers and some experts from outside.

The new Chrome 81 version is being promoted to the Stable channel, meanwhile, Chrome 83 and Chrome 84 will be promoted to the Beta version and the Canary version respectively. As per sources, Chrome 82 will be disregarded because of the COVID-19 charged atmosphere, and all progress from the version will be channelized into the subsequent version, Chrome 83.

While warning users of more security flaws in Chrome 81, Google confirms two new high-severity vulnerabilities infecting the web browser. As these new security exploits could allow hackers to run commands over an affected system by gaining unauthorized control, users worldwide are being advised by the U.S Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) to apply the latest update launched by the company in defense against these security vulnerabilities.

Both of the aforementioned security vulnerabilities were reported by Zhe Jin from Qihoo 360, a Chinese internet security services provider; for one of these, Jin received a bounty of $10,000 for CVE-2020-6462 which is a use-after-free error in the Chrome task scheduling component. The second one, CVE-2020-6461 was also of a similar use-after-free form but this one affected storage, according to the update notice from Prudhvikumar Bommana, Google Chome Technical Program Manager. 

Google has confirmed that the update will be pushed for all the users in the upcoming days and weeks, however, users are advised to remain proactive and keep looking up for updates to be applied manually by going to Help | About Google Chrome, where you can find the version you are currently running and an option to check for further updates. After installing the latest version, simply restart the web browser, and there you go being safeguarded against both the flaws.

Google Stops Displaying Security Warnings in Microsoft Edge, No Longer Recommends Switching to Chrome


Google has stopped advising Microsoft Edge users to switch to Chrome for a more secure experience as the browser extensions crafted for Google's Chrome web browser are also suitable for the new Microsoft's new Edge browser based on Chromium.

It appeared like Google stoked the flames of browser wars when it subtly encouraged Edge users to shift to Chrome by displaying warnings of potential security threats. The alert displayed by Google read that it "recommends switching to Chrome to use extensions securely". A developer at Edge revealed that the new Microsoft Edge is designed to effectively safeguard its users from malicious extensions, that said, Edge already had Windows Defender Smart Screen and Unwanted Application protection built-in.

Whenever a user visited the Chrome Web Store via the new Microsoft Edge, Google displayed a message in yellow at the top of the webpage recommending users to switch to Chrome in order to use extensions with added safety. However, seemingly, as soon as Google realized that greeting users with a warning message which clearly implied that Microsoft Edge is less secure of a browser is not making them look good, the tech giant softened and decided to take the alert down. Not only that, Google went a step ahead and replaced the previously displayed warning with a fresh one that tells users that now they can add extensions to Microsoft Edge from the Chrome Web Store.

However, still, officially only a few extensions are supported by Microsoft Edge as the installation of all these extensions for the first will seem to be a bit complex. Users need to enable 'allow extensions' from other stores via the settings page. On attempting to do that, Microsoft warns that it doesn't verify extensions downloaded from third-party stores and cautions that doing the same may cause performance issues in Edge. Then it suggests users get verified extensions from Microsoft Edge add-ons site. As soon as the users allow extensions by clicking on 'Allow', they will be able to add extensions to Edge from Chrome Web Store.

Google Chrome Extension, Shitcoin Wallet found stealing passwords and crypto-wallet keys


MyCrypto platform reported that Shitcoin Wallet, a Google Chrome extension was injecting JavaScript code on web pages, in order to steal passwords and keys from cryptocurrency wallets.


The extension, Shitcoin Wallet, Chrome extension ID: ckkgmccefffnbbalkmbbgebbojjogffn, was launched last month on December 9. With Shitcoin Wallet, users managed their Ether (ETH) coins, and Ethereum ERC20-based tokens -- tokens usually issued for ICOs (initial coin offerings) either from the browser or by installing a desktop app.

Malicious Behavior with the extension

Harry Denley, Director of Security at the MyCrypto platform, discovered that the chrome extension isn't what it promises to be. He found malicious code within the extension. In a blog, ZDNet reported that "According to Denley, the extension is dangerous to users in two ways. First, any funds (ETH coins and ERC0-based tokens) managed directly inside the extension are at risk.
Second, the extension also actively injects malicious JavaScript code when users navigate to five well-known and popular cryptocurrency management platforms. "

 Danley, said that the extension traffics all the keys on its system to a third party website at erc20wallet[.]tk.

 The malicious code works by the following process

1. The user installs the chrome extension Shitcoin Wallet.
2. The extension request permission to inject the malicious JavaScript code to 77 websites.
3. If the user navigates to any of these 77 websites, it injects an additional code.
4. The code activates on five websites: MyEtherWallet.com, Index. Market, Binance.org, NeoTracker.io, and Switcheo.exchange
5. After activation, the code saves the user's login credentials, keys, and other data then siphon it to a third party.

It is not constructively clear yet if the Shitcoin Wallet team is responsible for the malicious behavior or a third party infiltrated the extension. The Shitcoin Wallet team is silent on the allegations and has yet to give any comments on the matter.

Desktop App

Both 32-bit and 64-bit installers are available for the user to download on the extension's official website. VirusTotal, a website that aggregates the virus scanning engines of several antivirus software makers, showed that both versions were clean. But on a warning note, the desktop app may contain the code or something even worse.

Google Releases Chrome 79, Warns Users of Data Breach


Tech giant Google has issued warning of data leak for Indian and global users, after fixing Chrome 79 bug and re-issuing it later this week. Users were being sent notifications by the company via affected websites– through the means of pop-up alerts that started to appear on desktops, mobile phone screens and laptop screens; it forced users into reading the text which said that their passwords may have been exposed and hence they should change it immediately – "Change your password. A data breach on a site or app exposed your password. Chrome recommends changing your password for the site," the warning pop-up read.

As per sources, a bug affected data in select Android applications and Google had put on hold the release of Chrome 79. It was finally this week, Google's Chrome Releases blog confirmed the rollout of Chrome 79 for desktop and mobile platforms; Chrome 79 (79.0.3945.93) for Android comes with a fix for the WebView flaw and an assurance of improved defense against issues revolving around password protection of users.

According to the reports by media, the fix, "Resolves an issue in WebView where some users' app data was not visible within those apps. The app data was not lost and will be made visible in apps with this update."

WebView is a feature which is employed by various third-party applications to open a webpage, it ensures rendering of webpages within applications. However, here, Google Chrome is solely responsible for loading the content. PhoneGap and Twitter Lite are two apps that employ WebView functionality, as per AndroidPolice.

There have been various instances recorded in regard of the matter, nationally and globally, one such incident had a user trying to log into an e-commerce platform named 'Freshtohome' to shop fresh and chemical-free seafood as he received a pop-up warning him about the issue and advising to change his password.

In a similar manner, when one of India's media houses attempted to log into their portal, were faced with disruption and warnings began to pop-up onto the screen advising them the same.

In a public statement issued on Google threads, a Chromium engineer explains, "We are currently discussing the correct strategy for resolving this issue which will be one of: a) continue the migration, moving the missed files into their new locations. b) revert the change by moving migrated files to their old locations. We will let you know which of these two options have been chosen soon."

Google Chrome under Threat of Cyberattack as Zero-Day Exploit surfaces


As if it wasn't spooky enough on Halloween night, the Google Chrome technicians were further frightened to announce a critical update notification regarding various browser platforms. Then, what gave Chrome the creeps? Two security vulnerabilities were discovered, out of which one is a Zero-Day exploit in the open!


So, what is the whole story? 

According to Google, "the current Chrome browser (desktop version) is being refreshed to 78.0.3904.87 (a new version) throughout various platforms like Mac, Linux, and Windows. The critical update will begin to work soon. The chrome users are highly suggested to add these updates for safety, unlike the Windows 10 security updates (in which the users were told not to)." In the present time, it is not simple to obtain out any particular information about the two exploits involved, except that the Zero-Day exploit is already out in the wild affecting the update.
"Access to flaws and links can be restrained until most of the users are renewed with a solution. The constraints are also said to be kept under hold until the bug that exists (only if) within other party's archives on which alike projects are depending," justifies Google for the actions taken.

About the Zero-Day Exploit- 

The vulnerability is known as CVE-2019-13720, according to Google. The threat was described on October 29 by Anton Ivanov and Alexey Kulaev, researchers at Kaspersky. "As far as we know, the Chrome update by Google directs loopholes that an intruder could misuse to hack an exploited computer if wanted," said Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) and U.S. Department of Homeland Security Cybersecurity, in a statement.

Both the vulnerabilities misuse memory exploitation to intensify chances on the engaged computer. The CVE-2019-13721 vulnerability affects the PDFium library which is responsible for creating PDF files. But it is the latter, CVE-2019-13720, which is said to be misused in open which has an impact on audio components and Google Chrome. "Luckily, the threat is not very severe as Google has promptly recognized the flaws. The chances of any real damage in the' Zero-Day room' are least" says Mike Thomspon, applications security specialist.

New Security Flaw in Google's Chrome Browser Lets Hackers Access Sensitive User Data



Hackers are always finding new ways to exploit bugs and compromise sensitive user data, a recently discovered flaw in Google Chrome which could lead to arbitrary code execution, allows attackers to view, edit or even delete confidential data.

The vulnerability in the browser was initially reported by the Centre for Internet Security (CIS) and it could have allowed hackers to execute arbitrary code in the context of the browser. In order to keep the flaw in check, Google Chrome released an immediate update for its users round the globe.

In the upcoming week, Google will be releasing patches for Mac, Windows and Linux, as per the reports. However, the older versions of the search engine, which are the versions before 76.0.3809.132 are prone to attack.

To be on a safe side, users are advised to have their browsers updated and be aware of suspicious websites. The report also recommends users to avoid following the hyperlinks from unknown sources.

“A vulnerability has been discovered in Google Chrome, which could allow for arbitrary code execution. Google Chrome is a web browser used to access the Internet. Depending on the privileges associated with the application, an attacker could install programs; view, change, or delete data; or create new accounts with full user rights. If this application has been configured to have fewer user rights on the system, exploitation of the most severe of these vulnerabilities could have less impact than if it was configured with administrative rights.” Reads the report.

Google now pays more for disclosing vulnerabilities in Chrome OS and some Play Store apps

One of the hardest aspects of maintaining a cross-platform product is ensuring its security. Vulnerabilities can be exploited on various platforms in various scenarios, and it’s almost impossible for literally any company’s security department to fix all of them on their own. That’s why companies often use vulnerability disclosure rewards programs, which basically means giving money to someone who finds an issue in your product. Google has several programs of this kind. One of them is the Chrome Vulnerability Rewards Program, which awards security researchers for exploiting vulnerabilities in Chromium, Chrome, and Chrome OS. As you already know, there are a lot of Chromium-based browsers on the market, so the security of this product is crucial.

Today, Google is increasing the minimum rewarding amount for this program. Currently, security researchers receive a maximum amount of $5,000 on baseline reports. These exploits are mostly around escaping the sandboxing. Google is tripling the amount of reward for high severity baseline reward, bringing it up to $15,000. The price of high-quality reports with functional exploits of the same category got doubled. Previously it was $15,000, but after today Google will pay $30,000 for these kinds of exploits. Google is also increasing the bonus from $500 to $1,000 for exploits found via Chrome Fuzzer, which lets security researchers use Google’s hardware and scale to replicate the exploits.

The Google Play Security Reward Program got an update, too. This program only covers apps that have specifically opted-in.

- The reward for remote code execution bug went from $5,000 to $20,000
- The reward for theft of insecure private data went from $1,000 to $3,000
- The reward for accessing protected app components went from $1,000 to $3,000

To put it in short, Google decided to show more appreciation for all the security researchers that help ensure the security of their product. The changes will go into action today. You can start looking for vulnerabilities if you are competent enough. Maybe you’ll get some reward from Google.

Phishing Scam Disguised As Some of Victims' Most-Trusted Websites Hits Google Chrome's Mobile Browser




A shockingly simple however convincing phishing scam has struck Google Chrome's mobile browser, camouflaged as some of the victim' most-confided in and trusted sites.

Being alluded to as the 'Inception Bar' it has targeted on the Android mobile users for Chrome by utilizing a 'fake address'  bar that not just shows the name of a real site, yet in addition a SSL badge - used to confirm a site's authencity - demonstrating that the said page is protected.

This 'Initiation Bar' is basically a webpage inside a webpage where regardless of whether a user endeavors to scroll back up the top of the page to get to the address bar; they're constrained down, caught in the fake page.

As indicated by developer Jim Fisher, who posted about the endeavor on his own blog, hackers can utilize a blend of coding and screenshots to trap exploited people into surrendering their private information.

Fisher even exhibited that he had the capacity to change the displayed URL of his own site to that of HSBC Bank.




This trick is valuable especially for scammers who endeavor to cover a pernicious website page as a genuine one and steal significant data from uses like passwords and credit card information.

With some additional coding, Fisher says that the trick could be made increasingly advanced, by simply making the fake bar intuitive.

While his demo was done on Google Chrome, the trick would possibly influence different browsers with comparative highlights.

In any case Google has proceeded to introduce a rather large group of new security feature that explicitly targets phishing including forbidding embedded browsers and different highlights that notify users when they're perusing a 'potentially harmful' website.

Google Warns Users to Update Their Browser Immediately Due To a Disruptive Bug




A security breach revealed by hackers on the desktop version of Chrome has driven Google into warning its users to update Chrome as soon as they can or risk having their system 'hijacked'.

A part of Chrome called FileReader is supposedly thought to have been connected with the exploit, as it clearly lets software incorporated into websites access the information stored on the user's computer.

Being the most commonly utilized internet browser on the planet, with in excess of approximately two billion active users, the search giant is quite guarded about the details of the manner in which the exploit operates so as to keep the copycat hackers from utilizing comparable methods to attempt and break into user's accounts.

The fact that the security risk 'CVE-2019-5786' wasn't identified by Google in the first place accordingly implies that Chrome browsers were 'actively under attack  ' even before a fix could be released for the users, which thusly on the other hand gave hackers a 'head start' and left the user's systems at high risk even before an update is installed.

Google's lead security engineer Justin Schuh writing on Twitter, warned users: 'Seriously update your Chrome installs... like right this minute.'  Adding later that ‘unlike previous bugs found in Chrome which have targeted third-party software linked to the browser, this bug targeted Chrome code directly. 

Therefore he says that it is 'worth' cautioning user's all the more freely as the fix expects them to make the additional stride of manually restarting the browser after the update to invalidate the exploit had been downloaded.

‘Access to bug details and links may be kept restricted until a majority of users are updated with a fix, we will also retain restrictions if the bug exists in a third party library that other projects similarly depend on, but haven't yet fixed.’ says Google.

Chrome Zero-Day Attack; Google Advises to Update Immediately!




Chrome releases its latest version and the researchers request all the users to immediately update their versions of the famous browser.

The latest version is 72.0.3626.121 and was released in the very beginning of March 2019.

All that needs to be done to upgrade the older version is, type the specific URL chrome://settings/help which will inform the user what version is currently on.

All these alarm signs are blaring because of a recent zero-day security vulnerability that has emerged.

CVE-2019-5786 has been identified as the vulnerability and Google says it’s aware of it and hence is warning off its users.

A vulnerability happens to be a bug which corrupts the software in a way which reduces security. Whereas, an exploit is just a way of using the vulnerability to get past the security provisions.

All the vulnerabilities pose a threat to the system even if it means producing thousands of unwanted messages.

All exploits emerge from vulnerabilities but all vulnerabilities are not a fruit of exploits.

If made to work the malicious way, vulnerabilities could be forced to do a lot more than just creating error messages.

Zero-day is a vulnerability that the cyber-cons found a way to misuse before the researchers could find an appropriate solution for it.

Meaning that a Zero-day is an attack of which even the best researchers can’t find the solutions.

These attacks are usually found out weeks or even months later they start functioning on the network.

The bug is trying to be fixed by Google and restrictions are being retained until the bug exists.

The vulnerability includes a memory mismanagement bug in a part of Chrome by the name of “FileReader”.

This “FileReader” aids the web developers in springing up menus and dialogs.

The attacker could take control of a lot when it comes to this particular bug. It’s not just restricted to reading from files and goes far as “Remote Code Execution”.

Meaning, any malware could be implanted onto the victim’s system without any warning, pop-up or dialog.

All that could be done to save your system is keeping systems up-to-date at all times.

Also, always keep checking for updates and patches to fix vulnerabilities.

Security experts exploit Google Chrome Zero-day using malicious PDF



Security researchers have found a new malicious PDF  that could be easily exploited by the Google Chrome zero-day flaw when victims using Chrome as a local PDF viewer.

Attackers are exploiting the Chrome zero-day vulnerability to track the users and collect the personal information of the users when they open this malicious PDF in chrome browser.

The security experts at EdgeSpot were the first one to spot a flaw in PDF when it is opened via Chrome browser locally, but it has no malicious activities when it opened popular Adobe Reader.

The engine detected as  “POTENTIAL ZERO-DAY ATTACK (Google Chrome), PERSONAL INFORMATION LEAKAGE.

The researchers at Edgespot found that HTTP packet is collecting information of the user by the malicious sender:


  • The public IP address of the user.
  • OS, Chrome version etc (in HTTP POST header).
  • The full path of the PDF file on a user’s computer (in HTTP POST payload).


The users are suggested to use alternative PDF reader application for viewing the PDF until the Chrome issue is fixed, or you can switch off the internet while using Chrome to view PDF documents. 

CookieMiner: Steals Passwords From Cookies, Chrome And iPhone Texts!



There’s a new malware CookieMiner, prevalent in the market which binges on saved passwords on Chrome, iPhone text messages and Mac-tethered iTunes backups.

A world-wide cyber-security organization not of very late uncovered a malicious malware which gorges on saved user credentials like passwords and usernames.

This activity has been majorly victimizing passwords saved onto Google Chrome, credit card credentials saved onto Chrome and iPhone text messages backed up to Mac.

Reportedly, what the malware does is that it gets hold of the browser cookies in relation with mainstream crypto-currency exchanges which also include wallet providing websites the user has gone through.

The surmised motive behind the past acts of the miner seems to be the excruciating need to bypass the multi-factor authentication for the sites in question.

Having dodged the main security procedure, the cyber-con behind the attack would be absolutely free to access the victim’s exchange account or the wallet so being used and to exploit the funds in them.

Web cookies are those pieces of information which get automatically stored onto the web server, the moment a user signs in.

Hence, exploitation of those cookies directly means exploiting the very user indirectly.

Cookie theft is the easiest way to dodge login anomaly detection, as if the username and passwords are used by an amateur, the alarms might set off and another authentication request may get sent.

Whereas if the username passwords are used along with the cookie the entire session would absolutely be considered legit and no alert would be issued after all.

Most of the fancy wallet and crypto-currency exchange websites have multi-factor authentication.

All that the CookieMiner does is that it tries to create combinations and try them in order to slide past the authentication process.

A cyber-con could treat such a vulnerable opportunity like a gold mine and could win a lot out of it.

In addition to Google’s Chrome, Apple’s Safari is also a web browser being openly targeted. As it turns out, the choice for the web browser target depends upon its recognition.

The malware seems to have additional malignancy to it as it also finds a way to download a “CoinMiner” onto the affected system/ device.

Android Users To Surf The Web Without A Constant Internet Connection.




On the 21st of June Google presented a new feature for its Android devices that would give users the access in India and a few different nations to surf the web without the need of a steady Web connection.

Started for Chrome on Android clients in India alongside 100 other nations including Nigeria, Indonesia, and Brazil, the feature will enable the users to surf web in areas with no or spotty web connections.

“When you’re connected to free, unmetered Wi-Fi, Chrome will automatically download relevant articles, based on what content is most popular in your location,” said Amanda Boss, Product Manager, and Offline Chrome for Android. 

For users who are already signed in, Chrome will likewise reserve important and relevant articles in view of the perusing history with the goal that the user can read them when there is no web connection in the phone. This feature is now accessible in the most recent version of Chrome.

The feature case to set aside 70 per cent of the user’s data and with the data saver mode on, Chrome downloads the content that it assumes to be generally applicable.

At the point when the Data Saver is on, the most part of the web traffic goes through Google servers before being downloaded to that specific device and Google servers compress it so less data gets downloaded to the user's device.

Aside from this, Google likewise has a data saving application also that goes by the name of - Datally- it provides the user with a few different ways to control the data usage in their smartphones. The application accompanies highlights like: ability to set daily data usage limit, set a guest mode to see how much data a friend uses, highlighting the unused apps that may be eating up your data, data usage history, WiFi finder on map and many more.


New Malware Variant Designed To Swindle Financial Data from Google Chrome and Firefox Browsers



Researchers have as of late discovered Vega Stealer a malware that is said to have been created in order to harvest financial information from the saved credentials of Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox browsers.

At present,  the Vega Stealer is just being utilized as a part of small phishing campaigns, however researchers believe that the malware can possibly bring about major hierarchical level attacks as it is just another variation of August Stealer crypto-malware that steals credentials, sensitive documents, cryptocurrency wallets, and different subtle elements put away in the two browsers.

On May 8 this year, the researchers observed and obstructed a low-volume email campaign with subjects, for example, 'Online store developer required'. The email comes with an attachment called 'brief.doc', which contains noxious macros that download the Vega Stealer payload.

The Vega Stealer ransomware supposedly focuses on those in the marketing, advertising, public relations, and retail/ manufacturing industries. Once the document is downloaded and opened, a two-step download process begins.

The report said "...The first request executed by the document retrieves an obfuscated JScript/PowerShell script. The execution of the resulting PowerShell script creates the second request, which in turn downloads the executable payload of Vega Stealer, the payload is then saved to the victim machine in the user's "Music" directory with a filename of 'ljoyoxu.pkzip' and once this file is downloaded and saved, and it is executed automatically via the command line."

At the point when the Firefox browser is in utilization, the malware assembles particular documents having different passwords and keys, for example, "key3.db" "key4.db", "logins.json", and "cookies.sqlite".

Other than this, the malware likewise takes a screenshot of the infected machine and scans for any records on the framework finishing off with .doc, .docx, .txt, .rtf, .xls, .xlsx, or .pdf for exfiltration.
While the researchers couldn't ascribe Vega Stealer to any particular group, regardless they guarantee that the document macro and URLs associated with the crusade propose that a similar threat actor is responsible for campaigns spreading financial malware.

So as to be protected, Ankush Johar, Director at Infosec Ventures, in a press statement said that "...Organisations should take cyber awareness seriously and make sure that they train their consumers and employees with what malicious hackers can do and how to stay safe from these attacks. One compromised system is sufficient to jeopardize the security of the entire network connected with that system."

Because while Vega Stealer isn't the most complex malware in use today, but it does demonstrates the adaptability and flexibility of malware, authors, and actors to accomplish criminal objectives.