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Github Escapes from Octopus Malware that Affected its 26 Software Projects


Github, a platform where every malicious software report is equally different in its place, manages to escape from a malware threat.  Github, an organization that united the world's largest community of coders and software developers, revealed that hackers exploited an open-source platform on its website to distribute malware. The hackers used a unique hacking tool that enabled backdoors in each software project, which the hackers used to infiltrate the software systems.


"While we have seen many cases where the software supply chain was compromised by hijacking developer credentials or typosquatting popular package names, a malware that abuses the build process and its resulting artifacts to spread is both interesting and concerning for multiple reasons," said Github on its security blog. Fortunately, the hackers attempt to exploit the open-source platform was unsuccessful. Still, if it were, on the contrary, hackers could've secured a position in the softwares, which were to be used later by corporate applications and other websites.

Since recent times, open-source websites have become a primary target for hackers. It is because once the hackers exploit backdoor vulnerabilities on open-source platforms, thousands of apps are exposed to remote code execution. As for Github, the company's website currently has more than 10 Million users. In the Github incident, 26 software projects were infected through malicious codes, which is a severe warning for the potential threat of the open-source compromises. The experts have identified the malware as "Octopus Scanner," which is capable of stealing data by deploying remote access codes.

The malware spread with the help of projects using software called Apache Beans, tells Github. "On March 9, we received a message from a security researcher informing us about a set of GitHub-hosted repositories that were, presumably unintentionally, actively serving malware. After a deep-dive analysis of the malware itself, we uncovered something that we had not seen before on our platform: malware designed to enumerate and backdoor NetBeans projects, and which uses the build process and its resulting artifacts to spread itself," says Github on its blog. These attacks can be highly threatening as the tactics used here gives the hackers access to various systems.

A new zero-day Exploit Leaked to Bypass Already Patched Vulnerability (CVE-2019-0841)



An exploit broker and hacker, SanboxEscaper made a comeback and published the details about a new zero-day which affects the already patched local privilege escalation vulnerability, CVE-2019-0841 on Windows 10 and Windows 9 operating server.

The details of the zero-day have been published on GitHub and the account and repository from which the details were leaked are the same as the ones which attributed to the leaks of 8 other previously released zero-days. 

SandboxEscaper have been actively involved in leaking zero-day exploits since August 2018, some of the previously leaked zero-days are listed below:

LPE in Advanced Local Procedure Call (ALPC)
LPE in Microsoft Data Sharing (dssvc.dll)
LPE in the Windows Error Reporting (WER) system
LPE exploit in the Windows Task Scheduler process
Sandbox escape for Internet Explorer 11
Bypass of the CVE-2019-0841 protections
LPE targeting the Windows Installer folder

The hacker who recently exploited CVE-2019-0841 vulnerability which was patched by Microsoft in April can further install malicious programs, edit and delete data. The vulnerability can be executed by deleting all files, folders, and subfolders in the Edge Browser.

Commenting on the matter, Will Dormann, Vulnerability Analyst at the CERT/CC, says, “I’ve confirmed that this works on a fully-patched (latest May updates) Windows 10 (1809 and 1903) system. This exploit allows a normal desktop user to gain full control of a protected file.”

“Make sure you have multiple cores in your VM (not multiple processors, multiple \b cores\b0 ).\par. It’s going to increase the thread priority to increase our odds of winning the race condition that this exploits”

Basically, it requires the attacker to log in as a local user and then execute this exploit which triggers the vulnerability, which then allows the attacker to access and change system permissions and gain full control of the system making him act as the admin.


Docker Hub hack leaked sensitive data of 190,000 users




An unauthorized access to a database was discovered by the Docker Hub that exposed sensitive data of more than 190,000 account holders. 

The exposed informations include username, hashed passwords, tokens for GitHub and Bitbucket repositories.

The company started emailing its customers about the security breach soon after the breach took place. However, it is unclear how hackers got a hold over a single database.

"On Thursday, April 25th, 2019, we discovered unauthorized access to a single Hub database storing a subset of non-financial user data," said Kent Lamb, Director of Docker Support.

Docker is recommending all  its users to change their password. All the impacted accounts GitHub tokens and access keys, so the user’s with auto builds are impacted.

Docker hub is the cloud repository of images created by users, and it could be downloaded by other users or images created by other communities.

“We are enhancing our overall security processes and reviewing our policies. Additional monitoring tools are now in place. Our investigation is still ongoing, and we will share more information as it becomes available,” reads breach report.