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Showing posts with label France. Show all posts

Apple Deliberately Restricts Old Versioned iPhones' Performance; Gets Fined!



Apple, the technology giant famously known for its partially eaten logo among other things, was recently fined by France’s authority that regulates competition in the country, mentioned sources.

This apparently isn’t the first time that Apple has been fined by governmental authorities but it hasn’t mattered to the multi-million organization much before because of its money replenishing power.

Per reports, the reason behind this charging happens to be Apple’s voluntarily keeping the fact from its users that the software updates it released in 2017 could limit the functioning of the older versions of iPhones.

According to sources, Apple never updated its users that the time-worn batteries of the older iPhones, namely, iPhone 7, iPhone 6, iPhone SE and such wouldn’t be able to manage the increased battery usages.

The Directorate-General for Competition, Consumption and the Suppression of Fraud (DGCCSF) is the aforementioned body that in one of its reports elaborated upon how Apple’s software updates hindered the proper performing of older models of iPhones and how the company never realized their duty to enlighten the users about it.

The updates in question basically curbed the performance levels of iPhones to thwart excessive energy consumption of older versions of the phones, eventually trying to ward off a total crashing down of the devices.

The users could go back to older software versions or replace the battery and their iPhones could have a chance at working like they formerly did. The issue is a good initiative and has a solution but how are the people to know about this and act accordingly, if they aren’t duly apprised by Apple?

And what’s more, Apple restricted the users from returning to their previous software types, meaning the users couldn’t do much about the situation anyway!

Sources mentioned that Apple agreed to pay the fine of around $27.4 million for purposely limiting the performance of older iPhones and not alerting the users about it.

There was quite a hullabaloo outside of France as well regarding the same issue including lawsuits that got Apple to publicly apologize and offer free battery exchanges for affected devices.

As per sources, an Italian agency too had fined Apple and Samsung for not conspicuously informing the users on how to replace batteries.

But, $27.4 is next to nothing for a gigantic tech name like Apple. It would, with no apparent trouble, stock back the amount of money in just 2roper to 3 hours!

Altran Technologies, France; Smacked By A Cyber-Attack!




Reportedly, the France based Altran Technologies fell prey to a cyber-attack which attempted to smack down its operations in some of the European nations.



Last Thursday, a cyber-attack took the French engineering consultancy, Altran Technologies by storm.



This led to the organization’s closing down its It network and applications.



The firm instantly started working on a resurgence plan, making sure that it didn’t undergo much damage.



A large scale “Domain Name System” hijacking campaign is already being investigated and is subject to a lot of questioning.



This campaign is said to have wreaked havoc among a lot of government as well as commercial organizations, all across the world, cited the Britain’s National Cyber Security Center.

France’s data protection authority CNIL gives a sharp warning to WhatsApp ;issues a formal notice

Facebook, when it acquired WhatsApp back in early 2014 said that it won't have the capacity to link the WhatsApp users to their Facebook accounts. In any case, things being what they are, turns out it wasn't so difficult after all. A year ago, the organization changed the WhatsApp terms of services to do just that: link the WhatsApp and Facebook profiles belonging to the same user.

Facebook had allowed many of its users to opt out, yet that wasn't sufficient for the regulators. Germany had even requested Facebook to quit gathering WhatsApp data last September, a similar thing happened in the UK several months later and now fast forward to December 2017; there be yet another European nation issuing similar order.

Facebook's messaging service WhatsApp was given a one-month final proposal by one of Europe's strictest privacy watchdogs, which requested it to quit offering user data to its parent without getting the necessary assent. France's information insurance specialist also known as the data protection authority, CNIL gave quite a cautioning to WhatsApp by issuing a formal notice, scrutinizing it for "inadequate and insufficient" participation and cooperation.

The decision comes a year later after the European Union privacy authorities (security specialists) said that they had "genuine concerns" about the sharing of WhatsApp user data for purposes that were excluded in the terms of conditions and the privacy policy when people had signed up to the service.
However, even after the EU slapped Facebook with a €110 million fine over unlawful WhatsApp information sharing, France says that it has still not collaborated with information security expert CNIL, and could confront another sanction if it doesn't start thinking responsibly inside 30 days. The social network is as yet exchanging Whatsapp information for "business intelligence," it claims, and the only possible way that clients can quit is by uninstalling the application.

It was a French regulator, who saw that WhatsApp was sharing user information like phone numbers to Facebook for "business insight" reasons. When it over and over made a request to take a look at the information being shared, Facebook said that it is put away in the US, and "it considers that it is only subject to the legislation of the country," as per the CNIL. The regulator countered that whenever information is assembled in France, it naturally turns into the authority in charge.

The information exchanges from WhatsApp to Facebook occur to some extent without the users' assent, nor the legitimate interest of WhatsApp, CNIL said.

France says that while the notice was issued to Facebook, it's additionally intended to exhort users that this "gigantic information exchange from WhatsApp to Facebook" was occurring. "The best way to deny the information exchange for 'business insight' purposes is to uninstall the application," it adds. In any case, Facebook guarantees that it will keep on working with the CNIL to ensure that the users comprehend what data it gathers as well as how the data is utilized.

The merging of WhatsApp's data with Facebook was the first step taken by Facebook a year ago towards monetising the stage since the social network's CEO Mark Zuckerberg bought the company for about $22bn in 2014.