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Showing posts with label Fake news. Show all posts

'Yes Bank' registers a complaint against fake news, alleging it of frightening investors


Yes, Bank filed a police complaint against fake news stating that misinformation was posted on social media concerning the bank's finance. The complaint was filed at Mumbai Police's Cyber cell when the investors withdrew their shares, and the capitals at the stock market hit a downfall. The bank's police complaint says that the fake news was scaring away its investors and depositors.



The rise of mobile internet in India has resulted in social tremors, with users falling prey to false information. Due to the lack of digital literacy, people are easily exposed to Fake News.

One of the biggest reasons is that fake news is usually engaging, and frightening which drives people to share them in a flash. It intends to create chaos among the general public. For a few days, some perpetrators are circulating fake news and ill-disposed falsehoods about Yes Bank on social networking sites and WhatsApp to generate fright among the bank's clients. The information seeks to present the bank in bad standing and is aimed to defame the bank's image among its clients, shareholders, and society.

"Yes Bank filed a charge by Mumbai Police and Cyber Cell on the propagation of fake news and advertising of lies about the bank's economic status on different social media platforms such as WhatsApp," said the bank in its report. The bank also asked the authorities to establish a committee of specialists to look over the issue of rumor-mongering and find the convict guilty of spreading fake news over social media platforms, they also requested the experts to find the origin of the fake news.

The bank requests its stakeholders and investors to be aware of false information. 'We assure our client that Yes Bank's financial standing is safe and reliable and would continue to be the same for a long time,' it says. It is no doubt that since the last few years, fake news has become a threat to Indian democracy and the people of India. Misinformation that is aggressively spread or shared through social media platforms causes chaos and distress among the public.

Postcard and Indiatimes in a List of ‘Fake News’ Websites?


A US-based non-profit journalism school, Poynter Institute for Media Studies, compiled a list of more than 500 websites "spreading false or misleading information" which shockingly featured two well-known Indian news websites, Postcard News and Indiatimes.

Apart from these two, there was also the mention of Indian news website Firstpost, at first but when the portal in question took to twitter to unequivocally protest its inclusion in the list, making accusations against the Poynter survey for "flippantly" overlooking "the daily journalism that Firspost [sic] hosts… the reputation it has gathered for equipoise”.

The list was thusly updated to remove Firstpost alongside a US-based media house. The survey being referred to was led by the International Fact-Checking Network at Poynter Institute for Media Studies and the subsequent list of 513 websites 'believed' to have been related with unreliable news was released in a report called "UnNews: An index of unreliable news websites”.

Barrett Golding, who led the whole project, said on the website that the index was made based on lists that were “public and curated by established journalists or academics”, “contained original data” and expressed their criteria for inclusion, and characterized how they reviewed the various sites.

As of now when the two Indian news websites have been labeled "unreliable", India is yet to concoct a specific law to handle such counterfeit news or misinformation on websites as online media.

However, the Government doing the best it can, has appointed a committee under the Prime Minister's Office (PMO) the previous year to study more about the difficulties and challenges in online media, like fake news and malignant content, and concoct a strong structure to tackle them once and for all.

US: Fake News and Hike in Malicious Campaigns



'The internet is stacked with fake news sites in the present times,' says the research of Domain Tools, a security analyst company. The company scrutinized some top news sites of the U.S and examined their vulnerability to URL hacking and false domains. The false URLs may advertise misinformation and harmful malware, according to study. “As skepticism of traditional media continues to rise, defending the society from fake news attacks has grown relevant to the constitutional process,” says Corin Imai, a security advisor of DomainTools.

The fake news in recent times has attacked the credibility of news and raised questions concerning professional journalism. In present times, the media coverage is full of falsehoods and misinformation. The majority of the mainstream news sites can be held responsible for spreading fake news among the general public.

Why should one pay attention to fake news sites? 

'It’s no mystery that since recent times fake news campaigns are on a hike,' says Imai. 'The research shows that various top news websites' domain names have been tricked, and are vulnerable to URL hacking.' Honesty and assurance are the pillars of splendid consumer aid expertise. The study by Domain Tools reveals how wicked users do clever tricks like typosquatting and replicating domains as methods to wind up fake news campaigns.

Typosquatting, also called URL hijacking, is a technique that clings on internet users who accidentally type a wrong domain while searching for a news site on a browser. Whereas, spoofing is when a trickster acts as a genuine publisher of a news site. These unlawful actions can result in unauthorized stealing of user data, circulate fake news via spoofing news sites and, download dangerous malware into the user's system.

How to identify misinformation campaigns and stay safe from fake news sites- 

Fake news sites often benefit from user's browsing pace by hogging on their favored source of information. This can lead to data theft or vulnerability to fake news and malware.
Steps to avoid fake news-

• Beware of suspicious or doubtful domain names. Always pay attention to whether the web search is correct.
• Bookmark your preferred news site. This benefit in avoiding typos while searching for a news site.
• Visit the news website directly; avoid clicking on links that lead to news or information.
• Be digitally literate. Stay up to date with the latest trends and technologies happening over the internet.

By following these basic precautions, one can be safe from the risk of fake news.

Automated accounts sharing fake news ahead of French polls: Experts

French voters are being deluged with false stories on social media ahead of the country’s presidential election, though the onslaught of “junk news” is not as severe as that during last year’s U.S. presidential campaign, according to a study by Oxford University researchers.

A man looks at campaign posters of the 11th candidates who run in the 2017 French presidential election in Enghien-les-Bains, near Paris, France April 19, 2017. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann.

The study to be published Friday and another published on Wednesday add evidence to complaints by officials in France, Germany and the United States that Russia is trying to replicate its cyber-powered election meddling in American politics.

Just days before France votes in the first round of a presidential election, the study said misinformation at times has accounted for one-quarter of the political links shared on Twitter in France. It defined “junk news” as deliberately false stories and those expressing “ideologically extreme, hyper-partisan or conspiratorial” views with logical flaws and opinions passed along as facts.

“French voters are sharing better quality information than what many U.S. voters shared and almost as much quality news and information as German users share,” according to the study by the Oxford Internet Institute, which will be published on Friday but was made available on Thursday to Reuters.

The French study uses data from a recent week on Twitter but a greater role is being played by Facebook, said Kevin Limonier of the University of Paris VIII, who is studying social media manipulation in the election with a grant from the French government.

Facebook recently suspended 30,000 suspected automated accounts in France. Although it characterized the cleanup as an objective move against spamming, many of the profiles were distributing politically driven misinformation and propaganda.

On Twitter, where automated accounts are allowed, many of the same accounts that promoted Republican Donald Trump in the U.S. campaign last year have turned their attention to pushing conspiracy theories and far-right viewpoints, according to Limonier and Clinton Watts, a former FBI agent and now a senior fellow at the George Washington University Center for Cyber and Homeland Security.

WhatsApp launches fact-check service ahead of General Elections in India





WhatsApp on Tuesday launched a new service called Checkpoint Tipline, for Indians to combat the fake news ahead of General elections beginning this month. 

The Facebook-owned company was working with a local startup PROTO, which aimed at creating a database of false, misleading or disputed. 

The initiative is funded by the WhatsApp to study misinformation spread ahead of the upcoming elections for Checkpoint

The company has set up a verification centre, which would verify posts that are in the form of pictures, video links or text. This center will cover four regional languages - Hindi, Telugu, Bengali and Malayalam, apart from English. 

"The goal of this project is to study the misinformation phenomenon at scale," Proto's founders Ritvvij Parrikh and Nasr ul Hadi said in a statement. "As more data flows in, we will be able to identify the most susceptible or affected issues, locations, languages, regions and more."

In a statement released by the WhatsApp said the start up Proto would be helped by two other organisations who have prior experience working on misinformation-related projects.

"The challenge of viral misinformation requires more collaborative efforts and cannot be solved by any one organisation alone," WhatsApp said.





Indian students create an app for detecting fake news





A team of Indian students from Indraprastha Institute of Information Technology (IIIT), Delhi has developed an app WhatsFarzi for verifying a piece of fake news by using a custom logarithm.

The app is capable of scanning all the internet content, authenticate the images that could have been tampered.  “One of my students started researching on the rapid spread of fake content on Twitter and Facebook, which inspired him to develop a Google Chrome browser extension for both the platforms.

The continuous research by the team gradually gave birth to WhatsFarzi, which is now helping the vexed Indians to fight back such terrors”, said Ponnurangam Kumaraguru, associate professor at IIIT-Delhi.

WhatsFarzi is the concept of three students studying B.Tech computer science at the IIIT Delhi. The team includes  Madhur Tandon (22), Suryatej Reddy Vyalla (20) and Dhruv Kuchhal (23).

Suryatej Reddy, a third-year student, said, “We use a knowledge graph to extract relevant information from people, organizations, locations, and products available on the internet, update this graph with credible news and store it in a secured database. We follow this process to verify textual claims.”