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Showing posts with label Exploit Kits. Show all posts

Authors of GandCrab Ransomware Terminating their Operations after Making $2 Billion in Ransom Payments



The operators of Gandcrab ransomware are continuously maintaining and developing the ransomware and have released five different variants with no major difference between any two versions and the ransomware is known to be extra secured as it uses the “.bit” top-level domain which is not sanctioned by ICANN.

Gandcrab was distributed via various vectors that include exploit kits, spam mail, affiliated malware campaign and other social engineering methods. Along with plenty of malicious spam emails, attackers resort to ‘GrandSoft’ and ‘RIG’, two of the most popular exploit kits in order to distribute GandCrab. These spam emails are configured to befool users and make them download a script which further will download the ransomware and execute it.

Researchers have found that Gandcrab authors have made over $2billion from ransom payments, averaging around 2.5 million dollars per week. As per the observations made by David Montenegro and Damian, the owners of the ransomware told that they are to put their operations to an end now, after earning huge chunks of money (more than 150 million dollars a year) and cashing it out through legitimate sources.

The operators have discontinued the promotions of the ransomware and asked the concerned affiliates to terminate the distribution of the ransomware within the next 20 days. They have also asked the victims to pay the ransom; otherwise, the key will be deleted. However, it’s still a matter of question that whether the keys will be released after the authors shut down their operations.

Although, ransomware has been a constant threat in the field of cybersecurity for a long time but now it’s even deadlier due to the efforts invested by the threat actors in its development. Users are advised to stay equipped with products like ‘Acronis True Image 2019’ in order to stay protected against such ransomware attacks.



jQuery.com reportedly hacked to serve malware


JQuery.com, the official website of the popular javascript library JQuery(used by nearly 70% of top 10,000 websites), had reportedly been compromised and had served credential stealing malware. 

RiskIQ announced that they had detected a malicious script in jquery.com that redirects visitors to a website hosting the RIG Exploit kit.

The redirector domain(jquery-cdn[dot]com) used in this attack has been registered on September 18, the same day on which the attack was detected by RiskIQ.  RiskIQ believes that this domain was intended specifically to blend into the website.

The good news is that RiskIQ found no indication suggesting that the JQuery library itself has been affected.  Otherwise, many additional websites using the JQuery CDN to load the JQuery library would also have been affected.

The people at JQuery.com says they found no logs or evidence that their server was compromised.

"So far the investigation has been unable to reproduce or confirm that our servers were compromised. We have not been notified by any other security firm or users of jquery.com confirming a compromise." JQuery.com blog post reads.

TeamSpeak Forum hacked and redirects users to DotCacheF Exploit Kit

The official forum of TeamSpeak, a company that provides voice-over-Internet Protocol (VoIP) software, infected with a malicious script. 

Malwarebytes' honeypot found that TeamSpeak forum "forum[dot]teamspeak.com" is compromised and redirects to the DotCacheF exploit page.

Security researchers at Malwarebytes described that the infection is similar to the "malware infection on automobile forum" found by Kahu Security.


The malicious script injected in the forum takes several redirects to reach the Exploit kit landing page which is hosted on another infected website(atvisti[dot]ro).

The exploit kit page attempts to exploit the vulnerable plugin in the victim's browser.  If successful, it drops the ZeroAccess Trojan in the victim's machine.

RedKit: a new private exploit kit spotted in the wild

Trustwave security researchers have spotted a new private exploit kit in the wild. The new kit has no official name, so the researchers dubbed it'Redkit' due to the red bordering used in the application's panel.

The developers promote the kit with a standard banner, the buyers are required to share their Jabber username by filling the online form hosted on a compromised site of some unsuspecting Christian church.

"Logging to the admin panel presents you with options which are typically used by other exploit kits.The panel allows you to check the statistics for incoming traffic, upload a payload executable and even scan this payload with no less than 37(!) different AV’s." Trustwave researchers said.

As each malicious URL gets blocked by most security firms after 24 to 48 hours, the Redkit's author have provide a new API which will produce a fresh URL every hour, so that customer of this exploit kit can now set up an automated process for updating the traffic sources every hour or so to point to the new URL.

The kit exploits two of the most popular vulnerabilities but the authors probably will add more exploits soon in order to catch up with the “industry leaders” such as BlackHole and Phoenix exploit kits.

The first exploit is a fairly obfuscated PDF file that exploits the LibTIFF vulnerability (CVE-2010-0188) and the second one is Java AtomicReferenceArray vulnerability (CVE-2012-0507).