The Head of the FSB appealed for the creation of international rules on the Internet


The Head of the FSB of Russia Alexander Bortnikov stated the need to create international rules on the Internet. In particular, to make encrypted messages in mobile applications open to intelligence agencies.

If the international community can come to a consensus on this issue, the terrorists will actually lose the list of opportunities, such as propaganda, recruitment, financing, communication, management, said Bortnikov at an International Conference on Countering Terrorism on 18 April 2019 in St. Petersburg.

He noted that the use of cryptography in services for communication prevents the effective fight against terror. According to him, Russia has developed a concept for the creation of "the system of the deposit of encryption keys generated by mobile applications, which will be open for control” to solve this problem. Bortnikov proposed to the world community to realize this idea together and to provide intelligence agencies with legal access to important encrypted information of the terrorists.

In addition, Bortnikov noted that at the moment there are more than 10 thousand sites of existing international terrorist structures and thousands of accounts in social networks. The information is published in more than 40 languages, but the leading positions are occupied by Arabic, English and Russian languages.

Bortnikov added that the ability to hide data in IP-telephony and foreign e-mail servers leads to an increase in the spread of false reports of terrorist attacks, as well as the sale of weapons and explosives.

According to one of the amendments to the law on Autonomous RUnet (http://www.ehackingnews.com/2019/02/the-kremlin-told-about-hacker-attacks.html), IT-companies were obliged to use Russian cryptography for all traffic in the Russian segment. It is assumed that the Government will determine the issuance and use of codes and encryption.

In addition, in April 2018 Russia tried to block the Telegram messenger for refusing to provide the FSB with the encryption key of the negotiations of suspected terrorists (http://www.ehackingnews.com/2018/04/russian-court-orders-to-block-telegram.html).

The Australian Parliament’s Anti –Encryption Law Opening Doors to Potential Cyber Attacks




The Australian Parliament recently gave a green light to an "anti-encryption" law i.e. the Assistance and Access Bill, broadly recognized by numerous U.S. tech giants, to give the nation's intelligence and law enforcement agencies access to end-to-end encrypted communications.

The bill passed, regardless of vocal opposition from cyber security and technology groups far and wide who cautioned that even secondary passages structured solely for law implementation will without a doubt is exploited by those keen to make way to potential cyber-attacks.

Portrayed as a "secondary passage" or "backdoor" the move is said to, in a general sense debilitate Australia's cyber security and perhaps the other users of these innovations as well.

There is additionally a "far reaching concern" that this law will eventually have a negative impact on the employment status from the Australian technology firms as the global network will never again trust these products.

Lawmakers, who in the present digital economy ought to work to close the "cyber exposure gap", not augment it are rather debilitating Australia's overall cyber security posture, with causing a major impact to the economic outcomes also.

There is no denying the fact that law implementation organizations around the world face reasonable difficulties, however laws that debilitate encryption are the wrong solution.

Therefore, as opposed to following Australia's hazardous point of reference, other nations must work to guarantee open wellbeing while likewise shutting the "cyber exposure gap" and reinforcing cyber security standards for all devices. The dangers related with Australia's activity ought not to be downplayed because cyber security is as much important as national security.


Telegram's 'secret chat' feature stores conversations in plain text



The desktop variant for Telegram for dispatched a new feature called 'secret chats' for the users who wish for complete privacy for their communication. It occurred in this way, that the Telegram secure messaging app was unsuccessful in protecting the chat content locally and thusly offered access to plain text conversations and media that generally was encrypted.

Since Telegram's attention towards administering secure communication is notable the application utilizes encryption to guarantee that an outsider can't peruse the conversations on their way to the 'destination' and by using end-to-end encryption it ensures that just the sender and the receiver can get to the content.



These safety measures are against altering or breaking privacy in transit; the conversations and media files Telegram Desktop stores locally are genuinely simple to access and read since they are not encoded.

Nathaniel Suchy, a reverse engineer and software developer, was, fortunately, able to peruse the application's database and the messages spared there. Suchy said that  “Telegram uses a somewhat difficult to read, but otherwise, not encrypted, SQLite Database to store messages. By analyzing raw data converted to a simpler viewing format, I also found names and phone numbers that could be correlated to one another. Even so, the information is not easy to read, but custom scripts could help make the details stand out in a more intelligible way and automate the extraction.”


The researchers have proven the 'secret chat' feature as it turned out that every one of the messages goes to a similar database, regardless of whether they gain from end-to-end encryption or not. Even Media documents are not far behind as they have a very comparative destiny.

Telegram Desktop features highlights passport protection to counteract unapproved access to the application, yet this security choice does not include encryption. A technically knowledgeable and excessively inquisitive computer user could still be able to access some other users' chats.


Ensuring the information saved locally is conceivable by empowering full disk encryption from the operating system. This is accessible on Windows through BitLocker, on macOS through FileVault; the feature is available on Linux too.






Telegram founder agrees to register in Russia but won't share user data



The Telegram's founder Pavel Durov has agreed to register the company in Russia, after getting pressure from the local authorities.

Few days ago, the Russian communications regulator Roskomnadzor has demanded Telegram to provide information about the messaging app and company details.  The authorities also said this encrypted messaging app is being used by terrorists to plan attacks.

The authorities asked to give access to decrypt messages in order to catch terrorists. Authorities threatened to ban the Telegram, if the company fails to do so.

At first, Durov didn't agree with the demands.  Now, he is agreed to register the company with the Russian government.

"If the Telegram is banned in Russia, it will not happen because we refused to provide details about our company" Durov said in the social network VK.

Roman Jelud, a Professor from dataVoronezh State University, shared his opinion to Regnum that news about "Telegram ban" itself is a PR stunt.  This will only help the Telegram to gain more number of users.  Few days back itself, Roman said that Durov is using this for his PR and eventually Durov is going to agree to provide the required five points of information.

Though Durov says that they are only registering the company in Russia and will not share the users' secret data with the government, it will be hard to know whether it is true or not.

Russia is not only the government that is interested in the Telegram messenger. Last week, Durov stated that US Federal officers want to add a backdoor to the app.

- Christina