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Three Common Forms of Ransomware Infecting 1,800 businesses, Warns Dutch Govt



Around 1,800 companies are being affected by ransomware across the globe, according to a confidential report by the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) in the Netherlands. The report does not specify the names of the affected organizations but indicates that the targeted are the big players from different industries including chemical, health, construction, food, entertainment, and automobile. Most of these companies deal with revenue streams of millions and billions.

In the recent past, ransomware attacks have been on a rise and are being widely publicized as well, but due to the rapid increase in the number of ransomware attacks, many of these go unnoticed and hence unreported. As a result, the number of affected companies as per the NCSC report is likely conservative. Reportedly, the affected organizations are on their own as they recuperate from the attack by either being forced to pay the ransom or resorting to untainted backups to restore files.

NCSC's report enlists three file-encrypting malware pieces namely LockerGoga, MegaCortex, and Ryuk that are to be blamed for the malware penetration, these pieces of malware use a similar digital infrastructure and are "common forms of ransomware." While drawing other inferences, NCSC reckons the utilization of zero-day vulnerabilities for the infection. The dependence upon the same digital infrastructure implies that the attackers setting-up the attacks transferred the threat onto the victim's network via a single network intruder.

Professionals in intruding corporate networks tend to find allies who are involved in ransomware dealings and being experts they are always inclined to spot the best amongst all for whom they gladly pay a lump sum amount of money as salaries on a monthly basis in turn for proficient penetration testers that can potentially travel via infected networks without being detected. Here, the level of access provided determines how high the prices can go up to.

Cybercriminals are not likely to stop spreading ransomware as long as there are victims who are paying the ransom as they have no other option to fall back on, NCSC strictly recommends that organizations strengthen their security net to avoid falling prey to ransomware attacks carried out every now and then these days. 

GetCrypt Ransomware: Modus Operandi and Solutions




A new ransomware is in the dark market which encrypts all the files on the device and redirects victims to the RIG exploit kit. It’s being installed via “Malvertising” campaigns.


Securoty researchers found it while it was being installed by way of a RIG exploit kit in the “Popcash malvertising" campaigns.

First the victim is redirected to a page hosting the exploit kit, and then the malicious scripts on it would try to exploit vulnerabilities on the device.

If all goes well it will download and install GetCrypt into Windows.

How GetCrypt Works
Reportedly, when the exploit kit executes the ransomware, GetCrypt checks if the Windows language is set to Russian, Ukranian, Kazakh or Belarusian.

If so the ransomware immediately terminates and no encryption happens. If not, the ransomware examines the CPUID of the computer.

The Id is used to create a 4 character string which is used as an extension for encrypted files.

The four character extension that was created is appended while the files are encrypted. The files’ names are changed after they are encrypted

Later on the Shadow Volume Copies are cleared by running the vssadmin.exedeleteshadows/all/quiet command.

Then, the ransomware starts to scan the computer for the files to encrypt. No particular files types are targeted, except for files located under the following folders:
·       :\$Recycle.Bin
·       :\ProgramData
·       :\Users\All Users
·       :\Program Files
·       :\Local Settings
·       :\Windows
·       :\Boot
·       :\System Volume Information
·       :\Recovery
·       AppData

According to the sources, GetCrypt makes use of the Salsa20 and RSA-4096 algorithms for encryptions.

GetCrypt also creates a ransom note in each folder while it encrypts the files, named #decrypt my files#.txt

The aforementioned ransom note commands the victim to contact getcrypt@cook.li for payment instructions.

GetCrypt would also change the victim’s desktop background to an image with the ransom note written all over it which is stored at %LocalAppData%\Tempdesk.bmp

In addition to all the other things GetCrypt does, it will also try to encrypt files on network shares. When encrypting, it would also attempt to brute force the network account credentials.

It would use an embedded list of usernames and passwords to connect to the network shares using the WNetEnumResourceW function.

It could also try to brute force the credentials and mount them using the WNetAddConnection2W function.

Solution
All you need to get your files decrypted for free is an unencrypted copy of your encrypted file.

Simply download the decrypt_GetCrypt.exe program from the following link and save it on your desktop:

Once downloaded, run the decryptor and select an encrypted file you wish to decrypt and its unencrypted version.

Click on the start button. The decyptor will now brute force your decryption key and VOILA! Your files will get decrypted.