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The Antidrone system and a new platform for online voting were created in Russia

The Antidrone system will allow detecting drones that fly up to any object, said Eugene Kaspersky, CEO of the Kaspersky Lab. Depending on the model of the drones, the program can either land it, send it back, or stun it.

"This is necessary at sporting events, at airports, and for private businesses. Do I want someone's drones flying around our office? I don't want. This is the case when simultaneous sales will probably go both in Russia and in Europe," said Eugene Kaspersky.

Another startup of the Kaspersky Lab is an online voting system based on blockchain. According to Eugene Kaspersky, it can only be hacked by infecting a specific device. However, it will be difficult to infect a lot of devices.

"If you infect a thousand devices, it will not affect big elections in any way, but if you infect a million devices, it will be immediately noticeable. Of course, the elections will be disrupted, but we will see it," said Eugene Kaspersky.

The development also includes a process for monitoring online voting.

"If you want to observe the elections, put the server in the blockchain. So we simultaneously increase the blockchain, that is, the number of machines that calculate all this, and give access to observers. That is, if you want to be an observer, come with your computer,” explained the expert.

Also, during the pandemic, the company created its own travel accelerator "Kaspersky Exploring Russia". The program is designed to help tourism startups overcome the crisis and create the basis for further implementation of their projects. During the selection stage, the Kaspersky Lab received more than 500 applications from 47 countries.

Mister Kaspersky also said that Russia trains the world's best programmers, but this sometimes leads to the fact that the world's best hackers also speak Russian.

Amazons gets FAA's approval for Drone Delivery Trails



Retail giant Amazon got the approval to deliver their products from the sky (like your package dropped straight from the skies, well the thought is good but not really); that is to say, the online retail behemoth got USA's Federal Aviation Administration approval to start trials for drone airlines for delivery.

The Federal Aviation Administration approved Amazon Prime as an "air carrier" allowing it to begin deliveries by air with their drone tech, probably with the MK27 drone released last year. These will be under a trial program. Other companies that already had this approval are Wing, the Alphabet.Inc (Google) and United Parcel Service Inc. (UPS).

In recent years, companies in retail have been evolving and developing Drone Delivery to quite an extent and have achieved major leaps. Wing and UPS both fly their products to a limited distance via drones and Amazon has stated they would start their own trials through the exact data that was not mentioned. 

During the pandemic, Amazon made extensive profits and grew exponentially and their autonomous air delivery if applied globally with success could change the way for ecommerce forever. 

"This certification is an important step forward for Prime Air and indicates the FAA's confidence in Amazon's operating and safety procedures for an autonomous drone delivery service that will one day deliver packages to our customers around the world," said David Carbon, vice president of Prime Air, in a statement. "We will continue to develop and refine our technology to fully integrate delivery drones into the airspace, and work closely with the FAA and other regulators around the world to realize our vision of 30-minute delivery." 

The FAA said it has granted the approval to support innovation and development in Drone flights. But the approval was difficult and still has some issues as FAA's regulations are for humans aboard and not sans humans. Thus the agency is planning on making a new set of regulations for Drone flights. 

But routine Drone Deliveries still have a long way to go like something like this would require some standards for flight, machine, and mechanism along with proper air traffic control and route settings without a pilot - all of which would take years to set up.

DJI Proposed App to Identify Nearby Drones and Exact Location of Pilots


The world's leading producer of camera drones, DJI has demonstrated a technique to gather information about a nearby drone, precisely locating its pilot through a smartphone.

It employs a protocol called "Wi-Fi Aware", which makes the information about nearby drones available to anyone looking up for flying drones. The company said it would increase " safety, security, and peace of mind", along with preventing disruptions and security threats. However, the idea is being dismissed by security experts as they are of the opinion that it is not sufficient to fight illegal drone use and that the sophisticated hackers would easily manage to bypass the detection. With ransomware emerging as a service and being easily available, it's reasonable to expect hackers finding ways to circumvent the DJI's protocol. As a result, concerns have been raised regarding the viability of this "drone-to-phone remote identification" tool.

While substantiating the proposed idea, Brendan Schulman, VP of policy and legal affairs at DJI, said, "Remote ID functions as an electronic license plate for drones, allowing anyone who is curious about a drone in the sky to learn more about what it's doing."

"Around the world, aviation authorities have said remote ID is the key to allowing more complex drone use, and to solving concerns about safety and security." He added. "It's going to be very useful against rogue drones," said Elrike Franke, a policy fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations, in a conversation with the BBC.

"But it's not going to be enough to fight people with real bad intentions, because these are going to be the first people to hack this system."

Further explaining the model, the company said, "Using a simple app, anyone within radio range of the drone can receive that signal and learn the location, altitude, speed, and direction of the drone, as well as an identification number for the drone and the location of the pilot."

However, the proposed app is not expected to be seen anytime soon due to the lack of Wi-Fi protocol compatibility with advanced smartphones. Currently, it also does not work on iPhones.

Zomato successfully tests its drone technology

E-commerce companies and food-delivery platforms are globally believed to be among the first adopters of drone-based delivery.

Zomato, the online ordering and food delivery platform, on Wednesday announced that it has successfully tested its drone delivery technology. The test, which was conducted using a hybrid drone, was a part of the company's attempts to reduce the time taken to make a food delivery to its customers.

The first test saw Zomato make a drone-based food package delivery under restricted conditions, covering 5 km in 10 minutes and at peak speed of 80 kmph.

"The drone was tested last week at one of the remote sites approved by the DGCA. Such tests are done at very remote sites which are especially designed to conduct such tests," Zomato told IANS.

It comes months after Gurgaon-headquartered firm had acquired Lucknow-based drone startup TechEagle to reduce food delivery times and solve other issues like pollution and traffic. Zomato also revealed that it is forming a consortium as per Director General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) guidelines to carry out experimental Beyond Visual Line of Sight (BVLOS) drone operations.

However, the food aggregator did not reveal the exact location where the drone delivered the package.

According to the notification issued by Director General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) on May 13, interested companies have been asked to submit an Expression of Interest (EOI) to the DGCA for conducting experimental Beyond Visual Line of Sight operations (BVLOS) of Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS)/Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS).

Currently, while regulations prohibit payload carriage on drones along with disallowing drone operations outside visual line of sight, the government — while announcing rules for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) in August last — had said that the norms will be evolved with time as and when companies are able to exhibit newer technologies.

"The only possible way to reduce the average 30 minutes to 15 minutes is to take the aerial route. Roads are not efficient for very fast deliveries.