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Showing posts with label Data Leak. Show all posts

The data of Alfa-Bank's clients is sold on the black market


The data of Alfa-Bank credit card holders, as well as Alfa Insurance customers came up for sale in the Darknet. The bank confirmed the leak saying that it affects a few customers and does not pose a threat to the money in the accounts.

Seller who published the ad on a hacker forum said that he has up-to-date data on about 3,500 Alfa-Bank customers and about 3,000 Alfa Insurance customers. The ad was published on October 31, the seller registered there on the same day.

To verify the data, the seller suggested to look at 23 contracts. They contained the full name, mobile phone number, passport data, registration address, the amount of credit limit or issued insurance, the subject of insurance, as well as the date of conclusion of the contract. According to the seller, all contracts of Alfa-Bank are issued in October.

When the investigator tried to transfer money by phone number, in 11 of the 13 credit card contracts, the names and first letters of the surnames matched. Also he phoned up nine customers, most of them confirmed that they had recently issued a credit card at Alfa Bank. Fraudsters have already managed to make a call to one of the clients, after which he blocked the card.

Alfa-Bank confirmed the leak. "At the moment, it is reliably known about the illegal distribution of personal data of 15 clients. The occurrence of this situation is not the result of a violation of the protection of the corporate information system of the Bank, " - said the representative of the Bank.

According to him, the leak does not pose a threat to customer accounts, as it does not have data to access them.

Indeed, the contracts do not contain card numbers and CVV-codes, so fraudsters will not be able to get direct access to the money. However, they can use the information to call a customer under the guise of a Bank and find out the necessary information to steal money.
Alfa Insurance has introduced additional security measures and is investigating the publication of customer data.

Recall, in early October Sberbank confirmed of credit card accounts, which affects at least 200 customers of the Bank. It was announced that 60 million credit cards were in the public domain.

China supported website attacks Hong Kong activists : leaking their personal details online!


HK Leaks, a notorious website is targeting Hong Kong pro-democracy supporters, leaking their personal details online and there seems to be no way of catching the site and stopping it.

The website is using a Russian based server and is also supported by China's ruling Communist Party. From Journalists to lawmakers, around 200 individuals, those supporting the protests in Hong Kong have been "doxxed"- had their personal details broadcasted online by the site.

Since June anti-government protests have rocked Hong Kong against proposals to allow extradition to mainland China and clashes between the activists and police have become increasingly violent, with police firing live bullets and protesters attacking officers and throwing petrol bombs. With this new development, of doing activists; the situation shows no sign of dying down.

Privacy Commissioner Stephen Wong said he had ordered HK Leaks to take down all posts but the site remains online. On the home page of the website, a picture of black-clad protester is shown and a banner in Chinese saying, "We want to know who these people are and why they are messing up Hong Kong!". Phone numbers, addresses and personal details of hundreds of people are posted with their "misdeeds". And it is illegal in Hong Kong to disclose certain personal details, including phone numbers, without consent.

HK Leaks has a very sophisticated operation, designed to evade prosecution. It is registered anonymously on a Russian server, DDOS-Guard and has changed domain three times since August.

"The IP address that is shown for the website is not that of the website itself but of the DDOS-Guard company," cybersecurity expert Brian Honan said. The site has a bulletproof anonymous hosting, and whoever is running the website is very good at what they do. It ran as hkleaks.org in early August then migrating to hkleaks.ru, which discontinued in late October and since then three more similar domains have been used by the site.

"This site seems to be really well set up to reveal as little as possible and it doesn't use lots of external services, like buttons, statistics trackers, various scripts that would leak information," said Maarten Schenk, co-founder of the fact-check site Lead Stories.

To extract any details from the domain registrar, a court order would be necessary and the site is heavily supported by the big guns of China with heavy traffic, which is 175,000 unique page views. Chinese Communist Youth League, a group linked to China's Communist Party, has promoted the site's content on its official Weibo accounts. The state-run broadcaster, CCTV and Global Times newspaper, also posted similar messages on their social media accounts.

Some victims also accused the Chinese authorities of involvement behind the leaks, said that the fake address they gave the police during an interrogation showed up on the website HK Leaks.

The data of almost 9 million customers of Russian mobile operator Beeline was in the public domain


The database of 8.7 million former and current Beeline mobile customers was in the public domain. The test showed that the data is relevant. This database contains data of customers who connected Beeline home Internet. According to the press service of the mobile operator reported that the data leak was recorded in 2017, and the perpetrators were identified. Beeline assured that now most of the information is outdated data.

According to experts, the information in the database is enough for attacks using social engineering methods, and there are still no ways to deal with fraudsters of this kind.

According to the Beeline press service, the company immediately established an operational headquarters to investigate the situation.

"Part of the information in the distributed archive does contain the data of the subscriber base of customers, however, a significant part of the information is outdated and irrelevant," the company said.

They also noted that Beeline’s customer base at the end of the second quarter of 2019 was 2.5 million subscribers, and not eight million, as attackers say.

The company assured that they are making every effort to ensure that this does not happen again.

"We appealed to all file-sharing resources where information about customers was posted. Many of them immediately agreed to remove it," Beeline said.

It is noted that the criminals are trying to re-publish the data, which indicates their desire to discredit the company.

"Our security service is investigating this incident, we will be grateful for any information that will help this work, both from our customers and from colleagues in the market," the press service said.

It also reported that the company is working closely with the competent authorities and agencies to prevent the disclosure of personal data not only of its customers, but also customers of all Telecom operators.

The company assures that outsiders do not have the opportunity to carry out transactions with the accounts and tariffs of their customers.

SGS Servers Compromised In a Data Leak; Customers in Jeopardy!



Firms including MG Motors, Shell India and Daimler India commercial vehicles got in jeopardy as the servers of SGS Group got compromised.

The private data saved on those servers was up for sale for a mere amount of $10,000 on ‘Dark Web’ or on the private internet forums.

Per sources, the data includes quality reports of the few very prominent oil and gas firms and truck manufacturers.

The firm in question mentioned that the leak’s been plugged, the anomalies have also been corrected and all the possible measures have been taken. Also the clients have been informed.

The firm’s Korean division which contains over 6,000 reports and French division were also under attack outing thousands of user data and test reports of its clients.

SGS servers are probably going to have quite a financial impact for its clients and customers.

“The SGS company servers have laid bare legitimate reports and it’s bound to have serious implications as hackers have all the access to the kind of files on the DarkWeb”, said J Prasanna, CEO, Cyber Security and Privacy Foundation Pte Ltd, Singapore.

According to him the situation clearly points to the actual storage devices being compromised.

The concerned firms were questioned about the damage to which Shell replied that they are strongly focused on ensuring high standards for its customers.

A British National Accused of Stealing Crucial Company Data from a Reputable E-Vehicle Firm




A British national from Carbrooke in Norfolk, England has been accused of stealing 'crucial company data' from a rather respectable e-vehicle firm in South Bengaluru.

The complaint was filed on behalf of Mahindra Electric Mobility Limited's CEO Mahesh Babu by A Narayanaswamy, deputy general manager at the firm. The jurisdictional Bandepalya police registered an FIR against the suspect, Steven Grant Woolley under IPC section 408 (criminal breach of trust by clerk or servant).

Woolley, 54, joined Mahindra on September 4, 2017, on a three-year contract where he was appointed as the chief technology officer at the firm situated in Bommanahalli.

While serving his three months' notice period, the IT head of the Data Leakage Prevention System saw that pivotal organization data had been undermined and on cross-checking they found that Woolley had on a various occasions sent critical organization data from his official email id to his own email personal ID.

Furthermore, it was with this proof obtained from the Internal Data Leakage Prevention System that Narayanappa approached the Bandepalya police and filed the complaint against Woolley.

Woolley was thusly confronted with the breach of data and dismissed from service on April 17, 2019.

10,000 Clients Affected in Aegon Life Insurance Data Leak


Around 10,000 customers of Aegon Life Insurance, a joint venture between the Netherlands-based Aegon and India's Times Group, fall prey to a data leak which was caused through website's support channels, which clients used to communicate with the insurer regarding their grievances.

Reportedly, the data compromised included all the details ranging from the very basic demographic ones like name, gender, age to more specific ones such as health policy problems and annual income. It occurred due to a security vulnerability in the company's website.

Renie Ravin, Indian web developer and co-founder of the independent blogging platform, 'IndiBlogger', discovered the vulnerability which led to the data leak and reported it to the company in July 2019.

However, there is no evidence of the exposed data being illegally accessed or misused.

Referencing from the statements given by the company, "Aegon Life Insurance, India announces that a vulnerability on their website exposed information of some Indian customers who had used web forms to get in touch with Aegon Life."

"Aegon Life immediately fixed the vulnerability and have since informed all customers of this exposure. Aegon Life estimates that up to 10,000 customers were possibly affected."

"We will initiate an outreach program in the coming days to offer guidance to affected customers and to let them know what information was exposed. At Aegon Life, data security and customer privacy are of utmost importance and we will continue to be transparent with customers as we investigate further," the company added.









Logins and passwords of users of the Russian online store Ozon leaked to the Internet


The database including more than 450 thousand e-mail addresses and user passwords from accounts of the Russian online store Ozon was found on one of the sites that collect data leaks.

According to journalists, the leak occurred six months ago, but the company did not declare it. The found database combines two other bases, the originals of which were found on one of the hacker forums in November 2018.

As it turned out, a massive data leak could occur in three cases: data theft by an Ozon employee, an attack by a hacker who got inside the organization, or an incorrectly configured external server that opened unauthorized access to the database to anyone.

It is interesting to note that in 450 thousand of published logins and passwords, the number of data belonging to users of the company does not exceed a few percents.

"At the same time, most of the discovered accounts are inactive, that is, they have not been used for a long time," the company said.

Ozon explained that after the leak became known, compromised passwords were reset, and users were notified of the incident.

The official representative of Roskomnadzor (The Federal Service for Supervision of Communications, Information Technology and Mass Media) Vadim Ampelonsky said that Roskomnadzor intends to obtain explanations from the online store Ozon due to the leakage of user data.

Ampelonsky noted that Roskomnadzor is concerned about the actions of Ozon under the circumstances, as the online store did not notify in a timely manner about this situation, which threatened the safety of customers.

According to the official representative of Roskomnadzor, the e-mail address and password not only allows access to the user's account, but also allows to collect personal information and to act on his behalf.

The press Secretary of Roskomnadzor said that at the moment Russian laws do not oblige to notify the Supervisory authority about leaks, but now the relevant regulatory documents are being developed.

British Airways fined £183m for data leak





The UK's data privacy authority has announced that they have slammed  British Airways with a fine of £183m for failing to protect its customers' data.

The Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) said that this is the first time that they had handed out such a huge penalty, and had to made it public under new rules.

Information Commissioner Elizabeth Denham said: "People's personal data is just that - personal. When an organisation fails to protect it from loss, damage or theft, it is more than an inconvenience.

"That's why the law is clear - when you are entrusted with personal data, you must look after it. Those that don't will face scrutiny from my office to check they have taken appropriate steps to protect fundamental privacy rights."

The ICO blamed the incident on "poor security" at British Airways as its website was diverted to a fraudulent site. Through this pseudo site, the personal details of more than 500,000 customers were retrieved. 

Alex Cruz, British Airways chairman and chief executive, said: "We are surprised and disappointed in this initial finding from the ICO. British Airways responded quickly to a criminal act to steal customers' data. We have found no evidence of fraud/fraudulent activity on accounts linked to the theft. We apologize to our customers for any inconvenience this event caused."


British Airways has said  that they will appeal  against the penalty. 

One Plus found leaking user data

Chinese smartphone brand OnePlus has been reportedly leaking data of OnePlus phone users for years. According to a report by 9to5 Google, OnePlus has been ‘unknowingly’ leaking crucial personal information of its users publicly for quite a considerable amount of time and it is only when the major security flaw was pointed out to the company recently that it has started to investigate. Here is everything you must know about this breach in privacy.
According to the report, OnePlus has been leaking names and email addresses of hundreds of its users, through the ‘Shot on OnePlus’ application that allegedly carries a security flaw. The app offers you a place to upload photos taken by your OnePlus device to be featured as wallpapers by OnePlus users globally.
As the name suggests, ‘Shot on OnePlus’ allows users to upload their photos from the phone or from a website (for which they need to be logged in to the OnePlus account) and set user-submitted photos as their wallpaper. Users can also adjust their profile, including their name, country, and email address from the app and the website. OnePlus chooses one photo every day to feature in the app and on the website. According to 9to5Google, the API OnePlus used to make a link between their server and the app was “fairly easy to access” despite carrying private information about users. It said anyone with an access token could “do most actions” with the API. An API, or Application Programming Interface, is a software intermediary that allows two applications to talk to each other.

9to5Google said it discovered the “somewhat major” vulnerability in the API OnePlus uses for the app a couple of months ago, and that the company had already fixed it. It said it was unclear for how long users’ data had been leaking in this way, but believed it had been happening since the launch of the ‘Shot on OnePlus’ app many years ago.

The leak was reported taking place because of a flaw which was communicated to the company in early May but hasn’t been completely patched despite a fix being rolled out.

Unprotected database exposes data of 80 million US households




Security researchers have uncovered a security breach that exposes the data of more than half of United States households. 

Experts working with a firm named vpnMentor, that expertises in analyzing virtual private network services, discovered a database containing details of about 80 million American households. 

The database was hosted on a Microsoft cloud server, that includes some sensitive information like names, addresses, locations, gender, age, income, home type and marital status, among other data. 

However, social security numbers and credit card details were not enlisted there. 

Researchers Ran Locar and Noam Rotem said it's unclear who owns the 24-gigabyte database.  

'Unlike previous leaks we've discovered, this time, we have no idea who this database belongs to,' the researchers said. 

'It's hosted on a cloud server, which means the IP address associated with it is not necessarily connected to its owner.'  

Meanwhile, the database is still available online, and is not protected by password. 

'This isn’t the first time a huge database has been breached,' the researchers explained. 

'However, we believe that it is the first time a breach of this size has included peoples' names, addresses, and income. 

'This open database is a goldmine for identity thieves and other attackers,' they added.  






Data Leakage in the Federal portal of public services exposes the personal data of millions of Russians

Details of passport, social security number and employment data of 2.24 million Russian citizens were publicly available. Ivan Begtin, the Chairman of the Data Markets Association was discovered this leak. He analyzed the information of the largest Russian electronic trading platforms, where commercial purchases and public procurement are placed, and where important data was publicly available.

Begtin checked 562 thousand records of ZakazRF, 550 thousand records of RTS-tender, as well as records of Sberbank AST and other major Russian electronic trading platforms. Confidential information was in the public domain on each of the websites.

According to the Chairman of the Data Markets Association, the error occurred due to the illiteracy of developers and inaccuracies in the legislation. In his opinion, decisions on approval of major transactions should be published in the public domain by law. These documents often contain personal data. Second, the electronic signature that customers and suppliers use contains data about the name, e-mail and social security number.

Konstantin Bochkarev, the legal advisor of CMS, said that the disclosure of passport data may result in criminal liability for violation of privacy. According to him, there were examples when the phone number was recognized as a personal or family secret in practice of the Moscow city court.

Experts believe that the developers have violated the law "On personal data". The data can be removed by Federal Service for Supervision in the Sphere of Telecom, Information Technologies and Mass Communications (Roskomnadzor) on the request of an individual or media reports.

At the moment, Roskomnadzor has already sent to the electronic trading platforms requests for the disclosure of personal data of more than 2 million bidders.

It is interesting to note that Google said in December that the data of 52.5 million people started to be publicly available due to an error in the Google+ service. Applications independently requested data on age, name and e-mail. The company assured that the card data and other personal data were not available to the application.

Facebook leaks millions of Instagram passwords

2018 – What a year was it for Facebook! Data scandals and security leaks, issues from Cambridge Analytica and trails by authorities, Facebook have gone under every shit it’s connected with.

And the problems just keep coming in 2019. And in this year, it seemed to have enough already by internal probs, where is announced in a blog post last month saying, “Millions of users passwords were stored in a readable format in their databases!”

Just a day after the social networking giant admitted that it "unintentionally" uploaded email contacts of nearly 1.5 million of new users, Facebook has now revealed that it exposed millions of Instagram users' passwords in a data-security lapse. The password exposure is part of the security breach that was first reported last month by Krebs on Security. Admitting the security blunder, Facebook has said that the company it stored passwords of millions of users in plain text on its internal servers.

However, at that time Facebook claimed that “hundreds of millions of Facebook Lite users” and “tens of millions of other Facebook users” have been affected. Incidentally, the company has chosen just to update the old blog post while making the new revelation. "This is an issue that has already been widely reported, but we want to be clear that we simply learned there were more passwords stored in this way," a Facebook spokesperson said in a statement. Here's all you need to know about this latest 'password leak' from Facebook ...

The process was unintentional – according to Facebook – and happened when users were prompted for their password as part of a security verification process. It's been going on since May 2016 but Facebook says its now deleting all the scraped data.

In the updated post Facebook says: We will be notifying these users as we did the others.

U S disaster relief agency leaks private data of hurricane survivors


The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) is activating a Disaster Assistance Response Team (DART) to Mozambique to lead the U.S. Government's response to Cyclone Idai, which has caused catastrophic flooding, killed hundreds of people, and affected hundreds of thousands of others in Mozambique, Zimbabwe, and Malawi.

The US Federal Emergency Management Agency exposed 2.3 million disaster survivors to possible identity theft, according to the new report.

To date, USAID has mobilized $700,000 in total assistance to support emergency water, sanitation, hygiene, and shelter needs in Mozambique, Zimbabwe, and Malawi caused by torrential rain and flooding in early March, followed by Cyclone Idai. Of this, $200,000 is for relief efforts in Mozambique in response to the damage caused by Cyclone Idai, and $500,000 was provided to Mozambique, Zimbabwe, and Malawi in response to the flooding earlier in the month.

Those exposed by the breach included survivors of Hurricane Harvey, which hit Texas in 2017. The report finds Fema unnecessarily shared personal information, including bank details, with the outside contractor while applying for transitional sheltering in hotels, according to a report by the Office of Inspector General. The name of the contractor was not made public.

The USAID DART, an elite team of US disaster experts, will assess damage, identify humanitarian needs, and work closely with local authorities and humanitarian organizations on the ground to provide critical assistance to people affected by the cyclone. The storm, which has destroyed homes, livelihoods, and public infrastructure, follows a week of heavy rains and flooding across Southeast Africa that had already displaced tens of thousands of people.

Fema admitted the leak but said it had found no evidence that the improperly shared data was compromised.

“Since the discovery of this issue, Fema has taken aggressive measures to correct this error,” Fema press secretary Lizzie Litzow said in a statement. “Fema is no longer sharing unnecessary data with the contractor and has conducted a detailed review of the contractor’s information system,” she added.

The Dark Side of Kremlin- The Catalogue of Russian Data Leaks: All You Need To Know




Thousands of Russian emails and documents were leaked online in the late January in a catalogue named “The Dark Side of Kremlin”.


The catalogue was published by a “transparency collective” which goes by the name of “Distributed Denial of Secrets”.

DDoS encompasses an anonymous group of journalists, researchers, tech-experts and activists.

The documents contained private information regarding all the major hot-shots of Russia including the politicians, religious figures and the military.

The DDoS say, that their only job is to provide information to those who need it. If the information strengthens suspicions it hardly matters.

They also mentioned that their collection of data including emails, chat logs and attachments were hacked a few years ago by several hacking groups in Russia and Ukraine.

The Cyber Junta, Russian hackers Shaltai-Boltai, Ukrainian Cyber Alliance and other international parties were among the few accused.

The information leaked includes private documents and emails from the Ministry of Defense, the Russian Presidential Administration and other high-level political operatives.

Russia’s Prime Minister Dimitry Medvedev’s phone was hacked and his holiday pictures were uploaded online.

Russian President’s chef who controls companies that cater fancy banquets in Kremlin also lost his private notes to the leak.

The leak also includes the elaborate personal notes made by the chef on conversations between Putin and European leaders from Italy and Britain.

The most revealing hacks were the ones that came from the Russian Presidential Administration, which fairly let the Russian government, be a little more “transparent”.

The leak had details on how the government controls the Russian media and the way it transmits messages etc.

The most concerning part is that no one knows for sure how much and what kinds of information have been laid out bare in the open.

The leaks also provide an insight about the relations between Ukraine and Russia.

The inner-doings of Russia’s proxies and other insidious groups have also been brought into the light.

The DDoS had experienced a wipe on their servers making it imperative for them to upload it soon, in order to prevent the data from being censored.

Reportedly, this leak can’t be considered as a revenge for anything that has happened before, it was just an attempt at transparency.

A lot of the information present in the leaks was already available on the web but a lot of new investigations have been given birth due to this massive leakage.

This Russian document leak has created a paradigm shift in the way countries take their cyber-security seriously.

Analyzing these leaks could possibly lead Russia to adopting a new way of securing the web and its Presidential administration.

The government has already started taking care of its cyber-security vigilantly and all the loop holes will soon be filled up.