Search This Blog

Showing posts with label Data Breach.. Show all posts

Twitter Data Breach: Apology Sent to Potentially Affected Business Clients


The cyberspace has reportedly witnessed a fivefold increase in malicious attacks since the spread of the Coronavirus pandemic, it's primarily because people have been sidetracked due to systematic threat posed by the coronavirus that cybercriminals are not missing any chance of capitalizing on the adversity. Another reason guiding the crisis is based on the fact that IT has become the backbone of organizations as more and more employees turn to work remotely. In light of that, Twitter has become the latest victim of the crisis as the officials apologize for a business data breach.

Attackers have yet again gained access to personal details of Twitter users following a data breach that led the social media owners to seek an apology from its business clients and other users as well. The allegedly compromised data includes highly sensitive information related to the company's business clients' i.e., their phone numbers, email addresses, and last 4 digits of credit card numbers.

While confirming the data breach to TechCrunch, one of the Twitter's spokesperson told that when the billing information on ads.twitter.com or analytics.twitter.com was being viewed, some of the details were getting stored in the browser's cache.

Twitter warned the users of the serious data breach itself by sending emails to its business clients, acknowledging and appreciating the trust their users' place in them, meanwhile delivering a sincere apology for the security incident that might have led to a possible data breach.

"We're very sorry this happened. We recognize and appreciate the trust you place in us, and are committed to earning that trust every day." The email read.

"We are writing to let you know of a data security incident that may have involved your personal information on ads.twiiter and analytics. Twitter," Twitter said in a message to its potentially affected customers.

"We became aware of an issue that meant that prior to May 20, 2020, if you viewed your billing information on ads.twitter or analytics.twitter the billing information may have been stored in the browser's cache."

The issue was taken care of as soon as it came to the notice of the company, while Twitter also ensured that clients' who were
likely to be impacted by the security breach are made fully aware and provided with all the necessary information on how to keep themselves secure.

Chinese Hackers Attacked Eight Major Technology Service Providers




Eight largest technology service providers were attacked by the hackers of China’s Ministry of State Security; they attempted to access sensitive commercial information and secrets from their clients across the world.

In December, last year, a vicious operation was outlined in formal charges filed in the U.S.; it was designed to illegally access the Western intellectual property with motives of furthering China’s economic interests.

According to the findings made by Reuters, the list of the compromised technology service providers include Tata Consultancy Services, Dimension Data, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Computer Sciences Corporation, HPE’s spun-off services arm, IBM, DXC Technology, Fujitsu and NTT Data.

Furthermore, various clients of the service providers such as Ericsson also fall prey to the attack.
However, IBM previously stated that it lacks evidence on any secret commercial information being compromised by any of these attacks.

Referencing from the statements given by HPE, they worked diligently for their “customers to mitigate this attack and protect their information.” Meanwhile, DXC told that it had, “robust security measures in place” in order to keep their clients secure.

Commenting on the matter and denying the accusations and any sort of involvement in the attacks, the Chinese government said, “The Chinese government has never in any form participated in or supported any person to carry out the theft of commercial secrets,”

“While there have been attacks on our enterprise network, we have found no evidence in any of our extensive investigations that Ericsson’s infrastructure has ever been used as part of a successful attack on one of our customers,” a spokesperson of Ericsson told as the company said, it doesn’t comment on specific cybersecurity matters.



Massive HIV Data Leak; No Closure Yet!






Singapore: Finally the authorities have come up with some background details as to the circumstances that led to 14,200 people’s personal details along with their HIV status leakage.

The lingering questions, ever since the data was compromised have been intriguing. Such as, the reason behind not making it public in May 2016 when it was known that the information was in wrong hands?

According to a recent media briefing the Permanent Secretary of Health, cited that the ministry of health did wasn’t sure as to the whether the news’ being public was in the interest of the citizens.

They did mention though that they will take conservative measures and better approaches now that they know the persons in registry have concerns regarding a public announcement.


It’s disturbing that years after the incident took place no one knows why the data still remained with the unauthorized people.



According to sources, the Ministry of Health had lodged a police report in May 2016 after finding out that Mikhy Farrerra Brochez was in custody of the leaked information from the HIV registry.

After, the properties owned by Brochez and his partner Ler Teck Siang were searched by the police officials and all pertinent material found was seized.

Even after that Brochez managed to keep some information back and in turn leaked it later on. The Permanent Secretary of Health voiced that the police should have had a better search.

It was later in May 2018 when the people whose information as in the “unauthorized” hands were informed a\bout the entire leakage scenario.

In May 2018 the police found out that Brochez had managed to hold some records back which was a month after Brochez completed serving his jail sentence for other offenses and was deported from Singapore.

There is no way of knowing though, that how many people were informed that their persona details were in wrong hands.

MOH lodged a police report and had contacted the concerned individuals. The number of people was very small according to PSH Mr. Chan.


Where Brochez was deported to is still under wraps and the immigration department couldn’t share the details due to confidentiality concerns.

He is known to have arrived in the Kentucky state of the US. There’s no knowing if he’s being monitored, the sources said.

He had called at his mother’s house despite being warned to stay away and that’s when she informed the police about it.

After he refused to leave he was taken into custody and was charged. He has been asked to return to the district to face criminal trespass.

The Singapore police force is reportedly taking help of their foreign counterpart but didn’t mention which organizations or countries.

Brochez’s partner was charged with the Official Secrets Act for “failing to retain the possession of a thumb drive” containing data from the leak but was stood down and there is no answer as to why that happened.



According to Article 35(8) the AG gets a wide discretion as public prosecutor in the conduct of criminal proceedings. The prosecution “is not required to give reasons for why they decide to proceed with certain charges and not others”.

Another question that has yet to be addressed is how was the access to the confidential information disabled? We do know that the MOH had worked with “relevant parties” to disable the access.


Stolen information of such sorts is uploaded on various hack forums and file sharing sites such as “Pastebin” and “Mega” and is commonly hosted on web servers overseas.

If taking down a web domain. It could be done on a registrar level. Domain registrars are company people who create websites. But taking down a website can’t totally solve the problem.


Because once, data is on the dark web it’s almost irretrievable. As it could be copied or distributed across quite easily.


Absolutely different from the internet the commoners use, the Dark Web is “unregulated and decentralized and has no point of authority or disabling access to anything.