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The scale of data leaks of patients with coronavirus in Russia has become known


More than a third of all cases of leaks of personal data of patients with coronavirus, as well as suspected cases, occurred in Russia.

According to InfoWatch, in just the first half of 2020, there were 72 cases of personal data leakage related to coronavirus infection, of which 25 were in the Russian Federation. Leaks in Russia were caused by employees of hospitals, airports, and other organizations with access to information resources. In general, for this reason, 75% of leaks occurred in the world, another 25% were due to hacker attacks.

The company clarified that in 64% of cases worldwide, personal data associated with coronavirus was compromised in the form of lists. Patient lists were photographed and distributed via messengers or social media groups. Some leaks were due to the accidental sending of data by managers to the wrong email addresses.

According to InfoWatch, 96% of cases on the territory of the Russian Federation are leaks of lists, and 4% are leaks of databases.  In all cases, data leaks occurred due to willful violations. InfoWatch stressed that the disclosure of such data often led to a negative attitude towards coronavirus patients from the society.

The Russian Federal Headquarters for coronavirus declined to comment.  Moreover, the press service of the Moscow Department of Information Technology reported that since the beginning of 2020, there have been no leaks of personal data from the information systems of the Moscow government.

In Russia, there are no adequate penalties for organizations in which personal data leaks occurred, said Igor Bederov, CEO of Internet search. In addition, there is still no understanding of the need to protect personal data in electronic systems. There are not enough qualified specialists in this industry. As a result, network cloud storage used by companies, including for processing personal data, is poorly protected.

Personal data of one million Moscow car owners were put up for sale on the Internet


On July 24, an archive with a database of motorists was put up for sale on one of the forums specializing in selling databases and organizing information leaks. It contains Excel files of about 1 million lines with personal data of drivers in Moscow and the Moscow region, relevant at the end of 2019. The starting price is $1.5 thousand. The seller also attached a screenshot of the table. So, the file contains the following lines: date of registration of the car, state registration plate, brand, model, year of manufacture, last name, first name and patronymic of the owner, his phone number and date of birth, registration region, VIN-code, series and number of the registration certificate and passport numbers of the vehicle.

This is not the first time a car owner database has been leaked.  In the Darknet, you can find similar databases with information for 2017 and 2018 on specialized forums and online exchanges.
DeviceLock founder Ashot Hovhannisyan suggests that this time the base is being sold by an insider in a major insurance company or union.

According to Pavel Myasoedov, partner and Director of the Intellectual Reserve company, one line in a similar archive is sold at a price of 6-300 rubles ($4), depending on the amount of data contained.
The entire leak can cost about 1 bitcoin ($11.1 thousand).Information security experts believe that the base could be of interest to car theft and social engineering scammers.

According to Alexey Kubarev, DLP Solar Dozor development Manager, knowing the VIN number allows hackers to get information about the alarm system installed on the car, and the owner's data helps to determine the parking place: "There may be various types of fraud involving the accident, the payment of fines, with the registration of fake license plates on the vehicle, fake rights to cars, and so on."

Against the background of frequent scandals with large-scale leaks of citizens data, the State Duma of the Russian Federation has already thought about tightening responsibility for the dissemination of such information. "Leaks from the Ministry of Internal Affairs occur regularly. This indicates, on the one hand, a low degree of information security, and on the other — a high level of corruption,” said Alexander Khinshtein, chairman of the State Duma Committee on Information Policy.

The data of clients of the Russian bank Alfa-Bank leaked to the Network


On June 22, a message appeared on the Darknet about the sale of a database of clients of the largest Russian banks. The seller did not specify how many records he has on hand but assured that he is ready to upload 5 thousand lines of information per week.

One of the Russian Newspapers had a screenshot of a test fragment of the Alfa-Bank database, which contains 64 lines. Each of them has the full name, city of residence, mobile phone number of the citizen, as well as the account balance and document renewal date.

A newspaper managed to reach up to six clients using these numbers. Two of them confirmed that they have an account with Alfa-Bank and confirmed the relevance of the balance.

Alfa-Bank confirmed that they know about the data leak of several dozen clients.
The seller of Alfa-Bank's database said that he also has confidential information of clients of other credit organizations.

"I can sell a database of VTB clients with a balance of 500 thousand rubles or more with an update from July 17 for 100 rubles per entry," claimed the seller. However, the Russian newspaper was not able to get test fragments of these databases.

The newspaper also contacted two other sellers who offered information about users of Gazprombank, VTB, Pochta Bank, Promsvyazbank, and Home Credit Bank.
Information about the account balance is classified as a Bank secret. Knowing such confidential details makes it easier for attackers to steal money using social engineering techniques.

"There are two ways to get bases on the black market. One of them is the leak of data by an insider from a Bank or company. The second option is through remote banking vulnerabilities," said Ashot Hovhannisyan, founder of the DLBI leak intelligence service.
According to him, the reason for the ongoing leaks is inefficient investments in security. Companies often protect their systems from hacking from outside, but not from insiders.

The National Security and Defense Council of Ukraine reported a leak of IP addresses of government websites


The leaked list of hidden government IP addresses of government websites occurred in Ukraine. This is stated in the statement of the National Security and Defense Council (NSDC).

It is noted that specialists of the National Cyber Security Coordination Center under the National Security and Defense Council of Ukraine have found in the DarkNet a list of almost 3 million sites using the Cloudflare service to protect against DDoS and a number of other cyberattacks. The list contains real IP-addresses of sites that are under threat of attacks on them.

"The list contains real IP addresses of sites, which creates threats to direct attacks on them. Among these addresses are 45 with the domain" gov.ua" and more than 6,500 with the domain "ua", in particular, resources belonging to critical infrastructure objects",  specified in the message on the official website of the NSDC.

According to Ukrainian experts, some data on Ukrainian sites are outdated, and some are still relevant. In this regard, according to the NSDC, there is a threat to the main subjects of cybersecurity.

It was found that Cloudflare provides network services to hide real IP addresses to mitigate DDoS attacks.

In January of this year, the national police of Ukraine opened criminal proceedings due to a hacker attack on the website of Burisma Holdings. According to Assistant to the Interior Minister Artem Minyailo, the attack "was most likely carried out in cooperation with the Russian special services." To conduct an investigation, Ukraine turned to the US Federal Bureau of Investigation.

In May 2020, representatives of the state service for special communications and information protection of Ukraine announced hacker attacks on the websites of state bodies of Ukraine, including the portal of the office of President Vladimir Zelensky. In the period from 6 to 12 may, more than 10.9 thousand suspicious actions were recorded on state information resources.

Databases of users of Russian ad services Avito and Yula have appeared on the network


Six files with tables in CSV format are in the public domain, which means that anyone can download them. Each file contains the data of about 100 thousand users (three databases with information from Avito users, and three more from Yula users). Each record contains information about the user's region of residence, phone number, address, product category, and time zone. The first database was uploaded to the hacker Forum on June 26, and the last one appeared there on July 22.

Russian media writes that they confirmed the relevance of at least part of the published data by calling users at the specified phone numbers.

A representative of Yula said that the uploaded files do not contain personal data of users of the service.

"They only contain information that anyone could get directly from the site, or by parsing (copying using scripts) ads.

Yula is extremely attentive to the security of our users and the safety of their data. We do not disclose information about addresses from ads even when parsing (and this is visible in the files) and allow our users to completely hide their phone numbers, accepting calls only through the service's app," said the service.

The press service of Avito also reported that the user data contained in the databases was publicly available and this is not a leak of information.

The head of the Zecurion analytical center, Vladimir Ulyanov, noted that it may even be a manual data collection since user numbers on Avito and Yula websites are usually covered with stars. The published information, in his opinion, can be used by fraudsters in social engineering.

Orange Confirms Ransomware Attack Compromising Data of 20 Enterprise Customers


Orange, the fourth-largest mobile operator in Europe has confirmed that it fell prey to a ransomware attack wherein hackers accessed the data of 20 enterprise customers. The attack targeted the 'Orange Business Services' division and was said to have taken place on the night of 4th July and was continued into the next day, ie., 5th July.

Orange is a France based multinational telecommunications corporation having 266 million customers worldwide and a total of 1,48,000 employees. It is a leading provider of global IT and telecommunications services to residential, professional, and large business clients. It includes fixed-line telephone, mobile communications, Internet and wireless applications, data transmission, broadcasting services, and leased line, etc.

The attack was brought to light by Nefilim Ransomware who announced on their data leak site that they acquired access to Orange's data through their business solutions division.

In a conversation with Bleeping Computer, the company said, "Orange teams were immediately mobilized to identify the origin of this attack and has put in place all necessary solutions required to ensure the security of our systems." Orange further told that the attack that occurred on the night of 4th July affected an internal IT platform known as, "Le Forfait Informatique", it was hosting data belonging to 20 SME customers that were breached by attackers, however, there were no traces of any other internal server being affected as a result of the attack. Giving insights, Tarik Saleh, a senior security engineer at DomainTools, said, "Orange certainly followed best practices by promptly disclosing the breach to its business customers, who will need to take all the possible precautions to make their data unusable in future attacks: changing the password of their accounts and looking out for potential phishing or spear-phishing emails."

While commenting on the security incident, Javvad Malik, Security Awareness Advocate at KnowBe4, said that in these times, it is essential, "that organizations put in place controls to prevent the attack from being successful, as even if they have backups from which they can restore, this won't bring back data that has been stolen."

"As part of this, organizations should implement a layered defensive strategy, in particular against credential stuffing, exploitation of unpatched systems, and phishing emails which are the main source of ransomware. This includes having technical controls, the right procedures, and ensuring staff has relevant and timely security awareness and training," he further added.

CNY Works Data Breach: Personal Details of 56,000 Customers Exposed


Social Security numbers, names, and other personal details of around 56,000 individuals were exposed as CNY Works faced a data breach. The data breach potentially affected people who sought employment via the company's services.

CNY Works is a New York-based non-profit corporation working to help businesses and job-seeking individuals with the objective of providing skilled workers to businesses and employment for those seeking a job within Central New York – providing a single entry point for Workforce Information.

The agency started sending letters to all its affected customers, warning them about the security breach – the officials told that files compromised during the attack (likely to be a ransomware attack) on their servers consisted of their names and Security numbers. However, the agency did not spot signs of any data being accessed, viewed, or taken down by the threat actors.

Social Security number is a nine-digit number used to record a person's earnings and verify his identity whenever he starts a new job; having your social security number compromised can lead to identity theft in various ways, cybercriminals can sell people's identities on the dark web marketplaces to highest bidders. In a way, it's like getting your bank account info. stolen, only that you can always get a new bank account number, while new Social Security numbers are rarely issued by the concerned administration.

While addressing the security issue, Lenore Sealy, executive director for CNY Works, said in an email to media outlets, “We are sending notification letters to approximately 56,000 individuals.”

“However, we are notifying individuals out of an abundance of caution. CNY Works has no evidence that any of the personal information for these individuals has been misused, or even that any of the personal information in its possession was accessed or stolen as a result of this incident.” The email further read.

Hackers Leak Tons of Personal Data as IndiaBulls Fails to Meet the First Ransomware Deadline


Hackers demanding ransom released data, as the IndiaBull failed to meet the first ransom deadline. It happened after a 24-hour ransomware warning was issued, and when the party was unable to make ends meet, the hackers dumped the data. According to Cyble, a Singapore based cybersecurity agency, the hackers have threatened to dump more data after the second deadline ends. The hackers are using ransomware, which the experts have identified as "CLOP."


The hackers stole the data from IndiaBulls and released around 5 Gb of personal data containing confidential files and customer information, banking details, and employee data. It came as a warning from the hackers, in an attempt to threaten the other party, says a private cybersecurity agency.

About the data leak-
The dumped data resulted in exposing confidential client KYC details like Adhaar card, passport details, Pan card details, and voting card details. The leak also revealed personal employee information like official ID, contact details, passwords, and codes that granted access permission to the company's online banking service. The IndiaBulls' spokesman said that the company was informed about the compromise of its systems on Monday; however, the data leaked is not sensitive. When asked about the data leak incident that happened on Wednesday, he said that the company had nothing to say.

The cybersecurity agency, however, tells a different story. It says that the spokesperson's information is incorrect as the attack did not happen on Monday. It also says that it requires some time to carry out such an attack, in other words, the transition phase from initial attack to extortion. The company may have been confused or misguided, say the cybersecurity experts. In a ransomware attack, the hacker makes it impossible for the user to access the files by encrypting them. Most of the time, the motive behind the ransomware threat is money, which is quite the opposite of state-sponsored hackers, whose aim is to affect the systems. In the IndiaBulls' incident, hackers encrypted the files using CLOP ransomware. It is yet to confirm how the hackers pulled this off, but according to Cyble, it was mainly due to vulnerabilities in the company's VPN.

One Of Tech Giant Oracle’s Many Start-ups Uses Tracking Tech to Follow Users around the Web


The multinational computer technology corporation Oracle has spent almost 10 years and billions of dollars purchasing startups to fabricate its own one of a kind ‘panopticon’ of users' browsing data.

One of those startups which Oracle bought for somewhat over $400 million in 2014, BlueKai, is scarcely known outside marketing circles; however, it amassed probably the biggest bank of web tracking data outside of the federal government.

By utilizing website cookies and other tracking tech to pursue the user around the web, by knowing which sites the user visits and which emails they open, BlueKai does it all.

BlueKai is supposedly known to depend intensely on vacuuming up a 'never-ending' supply of information from an assortment of sources to comprehend patterns to convey the most exact ads to an individual's interests.

The startup utilizes increasingly clandestine strategies like permitting websites to insert undetectable pixel-sized pictures to gather data about the user when they open the page — hardware, operating system, browser, and any data about the network connection.

Hence it wouldn't be wrong to say that the more BlueKai gathers, the more it can infer about the user, making it simpler to target them with ads that may lure them to that 'magic money-making click'.

Marketers regularly utilize this immense amount of tracking data to gather as much about the user as could reasonably be expected — their income, education, political views, and interests to name a few — so as to target them with ads that should coordinate their apparent tastes.

But since a server was left unsecured for a time, that web tracking data was spilling out onto the open internet without a password and at last ended up uncovering billions of records for anybody to discover.

Luckily security researcher Anurag Sen found the database and detailed his finding to Oracle through an intermediary — Roi Carthy, chief executive at cybersecurity firm Hudson Rock and former TechCrunch reporter.

Oracle spokesperson Deborah Hellinger says, “Oracle is aware of the report made by Roi Carthy of Hudson Rock related to certain BlueKai records potentially exposed on the Internet. While the initial information provided by the researcher did not contain enough information to identify an affected system, Oracle’s investigation has subsequently determined that two companies did not properly configure their services. Oracle has taken additional measures to avoid a reoccurrence of this issue.”

Subsequent to reviewing into the information shared by Sen, names, home addresses, email addresses, and other identifiable data was discovered in the database.

The information likewise uncovered sensitive users' web browsing activity — from purchases to newsletter unsubscribes.

While Oracle didn't name the companies or state what those additional measures were and declined to respond to the inquiries or comment further. In any case, it is clearly evident that the sheer size of the exposed database makes this one of the biggest security 'lapses' by this year.

Cognizant Reveals Employees Data Compromised by Maze Ransomware


Leading IT services company, Cognizant was hit by a Maze Ransomware attack earlier in April this year that made headlines for its severity as the company confirmed undergoing a loss of $50-$70 million in their revenues. In the wake of the ransomware attack, Cognizant issued an email advisory alerting its clients to be extra secure by disconnecting themselves for as long as the incident persists.

Cognizant is one of the global leading IT services company headquartered in New Jersey (US). It started in 1994 as a service provider to Dun & Bradstreet companies worldwide; later in 1998, it became independent when D&B split into three, and one group of companies came under Cognizant corporation. Since then, the company has grown leaps and bounds making a name for its consulting and operation services in the industry.

The threat actors involved carried out the attack somewhere between 9-11 April, during this period of three days when the company was facing service disruptions, the operators mined a considerable amount of unencrypted data that included credit card details, tax identification numbers, social security numbers, passport data, and driving license information of the employees.

While giving further insights into the security incident, Cognizant said in its SEC filing, “Based on the investigation to date, we believe the attack principally impacted certain of our systems and data.”

“The attack resulted in unauthorized access to certain data and caused significant disruption to our business. This included the disabling of some of our systems and disruption caused by our taking certain other internal systems and networks offline as a precautionary measure."

“The attack compounded the challenges we face in enabling work-from-home arrangements during the COVID-19 pandemic and resulted in setbacks and delays to such efforts,” the filing read.

“The impact to clients and their responses to the security incident have varied,” the company added.

Wishbone Breach: Hacker Leaks Personal Data of 40 Million Users


Personal data of 40 million users registered on Wishbone has been published online by hackers, it included user details like usernames, contact numbers, email addresses, Facebook and Twitter access tokens, DOBs, location, gender, and MD5 hashed passwords. Researchers have confirmed the authenticity of the data that has found to be accurate – belonging to the users who have used the app. It could be used by attackers to carry out various malicious activities such as phishing campaigns, identify thefts, credential stuffing attacks, and account takeovers.

Wishbone is a mobile survey app that provides users a social platform to compare social content, the app hasn't disclosed its total user count in recent times, Wishbone has been enlisted as one of top 50 most popular social networking apps in iOS App Store for years now, also making it to the top 10 in its prime.

This breach came as the second-largest security incident in the last three years for the app, earlier in 2017, hackers breached around 2.2 million email addresses and 287,000 phone numbers. It mainly contained kids' personal details. However, the recent breach mainly consists of numbers belonging to young women.

According to the reports, the database was circulating secretly since March, it has been put up for sale on dark web forums for thousands of dollars. Later, 'ShinyHunters', a dark web trader who allegedly leaked the data, stated that they will be publishing the data for free after individuals began reselling it.

While commenting on the matter, senior vice president of data security specialists comforte AG, Mark Bower said, “It looks like security and privacy have been an afterthought, not a matter of culture and software development process. If the passwords are hashed with MD5, then the users affected should be immediately making sure their ID’s and passwords aren’t used elsewhere with the same password. MD5 is a goner as far as security is concerned but used by mistaken developers unfamiliar with its security risks or using older code libraries using MD5. Hashed MD5 passwords aren’t difficult to brute force. The bigger issue here is the personal data though – so now attackers have a bunch more data for social engineering.”

Security experts have recommended Wishbone users to update or change their passwords and stay wary of any suspicious activity in their account.

The database of Russian car owners is sold for bitcoins


According to the description of the database, it contains 129 million leads obtained from the traffic police register. This is information about vehicles registered in Russia: the place of registration, make and model of the car, date of initial and last registration.

An employee of the car-sharing company whose vehicle data is contained in the registry confirmed the authenticity of the data.
Moreover, cybersecurity experts have already verified the authenticity of the documents. They also noted that this database was most likely stolen from the traffic police or insurance companies.

"Most often leaks occur in the traffic police and insurance companies", said Ashot Hovhannisyan, founder and technical director of DeviceLock, said that the database of motorists is regularly sold on the Darknet.

According to him, now this database is unique, as it contains information about the initial registration of cars since the 1990s.
For an additional fee, sellers offer to provide personal data of car owners, including last name, first name and patronymic, address, date of birth, passport number, and contact information. They also sell the TIN of legal entities where the car is registered.

The full version of the database with all data costs 0.3 bitcoin (approximately $2.8 thousand). 1.5 bitcoins (about $14 thousand) will cost the transfer to exclusive use.

Mikhail Firsov, Technical Director of Information Security Systems, believes that companies that buy such databases can use them to conduct illegal financial transactions, execute transactions, and fake legal documents.

Earlier, E Hacking News reported about the sale of data of 9 million customers of the Express transportation service CDEK in the Darknet. This is the largest leak of personal data in Russian delivery services.

Data of 9 million customers of the Russian courier service CDEK leaked


Data belonging to nine million customers of the CDEC Express transportation service was put up for sale on the Web for 70 thousand rubles ($950). This is the largest leak of personal data in Russian delivery services

Telegram channel In4security noticed that the database contains information about the delivery and location of goods and information about buyers, including Tax Identification Numbers. The seller of the database sent the author of the Telegram channel screenshots dated May 8, 2020. This indicates that the databases are fresh.

The CDEC claims that there was no data leak from the company. As the representative of the service stressed, personal data is collected by many companies, including state aggregators, the leak could have occurred on any of these resources.

Andrey Arsentiev, Head of Analytics and Special Projects at InfoWatch Group of Companies, said that this is the largest leak of personal data from Russian delivery services. He notes that the information of CDEC users is not leaked for the first time: previously, customers of the delivery service complained that personal data of other people is visible on the company's website due to vulnerabilities.

Head of Security Department of SearchInform Alex Drozd warned that after leaks there are always calls from scammers. They call the victim and introduce themselves as company employees and try to find out information about billing information.

The interest of fraudsters in the data of courier services may be associated with an increase in demand for their services during the coronavirus pandemic and self-isolation.
The company also recalled that recently, cases of detection of fraudulent sites that act on behalf of CDEC have become more frequent.

It should be noted that in recent weeks, there has been an increase in phishing sites: online cinemas, online stores, training courses, legal advice, government portals.  Earlier, E Hacking News reported that Russia has bypassed the USA in hosting for phishing resources.

'ShinyHunters', a Hacker Group Selling Databases of 10 Organization on the Dark Web for $18,000


A group of hackers has put the user databases of 10 companies for sale on the dark web, a part of the internet world that requires specialized software to be accessed, it isn't normally visible to search engines. 

The group that is selling more than 73.2 million user records goes by the name of 'Shinyhunters' and was reportedly behind the breach of Indonesia's biggest online store, Tokopedia. Notably, it's the success of Tokopedia's breach that has encouraged the hackers to steal and sell data from various organizations including Zoosk (online dating app, 30 million records), Minted (online marketplace, 5 million records), Chatbooks (Printing service, 15 million records), Mindful (Health magazine, 2 million records), Bhinneka (Indonesia online store, 1.2 million records), Home Chef (Food delivery service, 8 million records) and others. The samples of the aforementioned stolen records have been shared by the hackers; security experts have verified the same to confirm the authenticity of most of the databases that are being sold separately by the hackers for almost $18,000. However, the legitimacy of some of the enlisted user records is yet to be proved. Despite the ambiguity and confusion, ShinyHunters seems to be a well-founded threat actor as per community sources. 

In the last week's breach targeting Tokopedia, initially, hackers published 15 million user records for free, however, later on, the organization's full database containing around 91 million records was put on sale for $5,000. 

Allegedly the hacker group has also been involved in the data breach of a very popular Facebook-funded education initiative, Unacademy, the breach affected a total of 22 million user records. 

Reports indicate that the data posted by hackers contain authentic databases that could lead to serious concerns for all the affected organizations, although there are limited insights available about ShinyHunters, the modus-operandi of the hacker group resembles that of Gnosticplayers, a computing hacking group that made headlines for selling stolen data of the dark web with its latest victim being Zynga Inc, a mobile social game company.

Canada Cybersecurity: Health Care Industry Battles Cyberattacks as Experts Call-in Federal Support


Canada's hospitals and clinics are suffering massive cyber threats as the cyberattacks targeting the Canadian healthcare industry saw a sudden rise in number.

Researchers reported that the health-care sector is the most targeted sector in Canada amounting to a total of 48% of all security breaches in the country. Digital security of hospitals in Canada is being exposed to heavy risk as the growing number of data-breach incidents imply how the healthcare industry has become the new favorite of cybercriminals.

The issue has gained widespread attention that led to calls for imposing national cybersecurity standards on the healthcare industry. In order to tackle the problem effectively and protect the privacy of their patients, the institutions are required to update their cybersecurity arsenal for which the federal government's involvement is deemed necessary by the experts.

While commenting on the matter, Paul-Émile Cloutier, the president and CEO of HealthcareCAN, said: "My biggest disappointment at this moment is that it seems that anything that has to do with the health sector and cybersecurity is falling between the cracks at the federal level."

Cybersecurity experts expressed their concern in regard and put into perspective the current inability of the Canadian health system to cope up with the increasing risk.

Experts believe that information regarding a person's health can potentially be of more value to the cybercrime space than credit card data itself for an individual's health care identity contains data with unique values that remains the same over time such as the individual's health number or DOB, it assists hackers in stealing identities by making the process smooth.

Over the past year, various Canadian health-care institutions became victim of breaches including LifeLabs, one of the country's largest medical laboratory of diagnostic testing for healthcare, which was hit by a massive cyberattack compromising the health data of around 15 million Canadians. The private provider was forced to pay a ransom in order to retrieve the stolen customer data.

In another incident, attackers breached the computer networks of three hospitals in Ontario that led to a temporary shut down of diagnostic clinics and non-emergency cases were told to come back later.

The prosecutor's office identified a leak of the full database export and import operations in Russia for eight years


Yekaterina Korotkova, the representative of the Moscow Interregional Transport Prosecutor's Office reported that the Northern Transport Prosecutor’s Office revealed a leak on the Internet of a full database of export-import operations of Russian companies at customs posts over eight years.
“It was established that one of the Darknet sites has on sale a complete, regularly-updated customs database for all export-import operations of Russian companies for 2012-2019 (data for all customs posts of the Russian Federation),” said Korotkova.

According to her, the site contains full declarations of all participants in foreign economic activity of Russia, TIN of recipients, senders, information about the processed goods, indicating the Declaration numbers, the country of origin of the goods, surnames, first names, patronymics of their representatives, vehicle numbers, contact numbers, as well as information about risks.

"The customs authorities' databases on the website for acquiring contain information of limited access and personal data," added the representative of the Ministry of Transport and Trade of Ukraine.

The Prosecutor's office through the court demanded to recognize this information prohibited on the territory of Russia.

The court granted the claim. After entering into force, the court's decision will be sent to Roskomnadzor to include the resource in the Unified register of information, the distribution of which is prohibited on the territory of the Russian Federation.

In December 2019, the Investigative Committee reported that during operational activities it was possible to establish a hacker who was to blame for the leak of personal data of several hundred thousand employees of the Russian Railways company on the Internet. A 27-year-old hacker from Krasnodar was charged with illegally obtaining and disclosing trade secrets and illegally accessing protected information.

Investigators found that in June 2019, the accused was able to access internal resources of the Russian Railways computer network. He copied the personal data of several hundred thousand employees, including managers, of Russian Railways and posted it on the Internet. The young man pleaded guilty to committing this cyberattack.

250,000+ Login/Passwords Leaked in The Trident Crypto Fund Data Breach


More than 260,000 customers’ data was compromised online in a gigantic data breach that went down pretty recently.

Trident Crypto Fund, per reports, experienced this data breach which gave rise to the leakage of thousands of customer records including usernames and passwords, online.

Per sources, Trident is a crypto-investment index fund that functions as an arm of the “Dragonara Business Center”, Italy. It also is reportedly the “first coin-based index fund”.

And like scattered sugar for ants, the leaked records were immediately devoured by the cyber-cons right after they were compromised.

Per sources, personal data of over 260,000 registered users of the Trident Crypto Fund was left bare for people to exploit as per they wished to.

Reports mention that the leaked data comprised of phone numbers, encrypted passwords, email addresses, and IP addresses.

The aforementioned data was discovered to be published on several “file-sharing” websites in the past month.

According to researchers, the hackers had evidently de-crypted the stolen files and published an array of over 120,000 passwords at the beginning of March. It was also found out that the password and login ID pairs were matchless with the ones previously leaked.

The details or even the mention of the data breach haven’t appeared on the website or on other communication platforms. But reportedly, a victim of the breach was contacted who confirmed the connection between the fund and the leaked data.

As mentioned on the fund’s website, the company “works hard” to protect its customers’ data and secure accounts. They allegedly are also investigating the “suspected breach”.

The Russians were the ones to get heavily affected by the above-mentioned data leak as the compromised data was a direct key to their accounts. Word has it that more than 10,000 Russian users were impacted by the Trident Crypto Fund data breach.

Even though it’s possible that Russian residents might have had their records leaked previously as well, there are no records of that happening.

Nevertheless, this data breach structured the history of data leakages for Russia as this happens to be one of the first major ‘Personal’ data breaches the country’s citizens have faced that has had such a major impact.

Security is Clearview’s top priority?


Clearview AI an American technology company was, as of late breached as hackers figured out how to exploit a security flaw and 'make-off' its whole client list. Despite the fact that there's a lot of reason of concern, the specific nature and source of the breach remain unknown as of now. The company anyway has emphasized over and over that it has already patched the vulnerability and insists its that servers were not accessed. 

The facial recognition software company has made claims, that not exclusively does its clientele incorporates many police stations, but it purportedly services the FBI and DHS and said that they are exclusively working with law enforcement agencies. 

The Daily Beast's Betsy Swan originally investigated the breach. In the wake of assessing the documents from Clearview AI staff they wrote: 

Clearview AI disclosed to its customers that an intruder “gained unauthorized access” to its list of customers, to the number of users accounts those customers had set up, and to the number of searches its customers have conducted. 

The breach, however, isn't the main issue Clearview AI has to deal with currently. It's additionally entangled in a standoff with an alliance of tech titans hell-bent on seeing it shutdown. The contention comes from the company's utilization of "publicly available" images of peoples from the internet to compile its database. 

Supposedly, Clearview has billions of images in its database of simply peoples' faces. It assembles these images by utilizing a "crawler" AI to scour websites like Facebook, Twitter, and Google Image Search for each accessible picture. At that point, it coordinates the faces with whatever data it can discover on the internet and gives law enforcement access in a convenient application. 

Up until now, the company's gotten cease and desist letters from Microsoft, Google, Venmo, and Twitter. While it's very vague precisely what legitimate response Clearview has now, it seems like it might be going towards a court confrontation like HiQ v. LinkedIn.

Financial and Customer Info being Exposed in Slickwraps Data Breach


Slickwraps, a mobile device case retailer that specializes in designing and assembling the most precision-fitted phone cases in the world has suffered a major data breach that exposed the personal information of employees including their API credentials, resumes and much more.



In January 2020, a security researcher named Lynx attempted to gain access to Slickwraps's systems, he acquired full access to the company's website employing a path traversal vulnerability present in a script which is used by them for customizing cases.

After exploiting the vulnerability, Lynx sent emails stating the same to the company and upon receiving no response to those emails, he decided to make public disclosure of the vulnerability and how he exploited it to acquire access to the systems and the data that was compromised.

While giving insights of the incident, Lynx told that it allowed them to acquire access to 9GB of personal customer data that included employee resumes, customers' pictures, API credentials, ZenDesk ticketing system along with more sensitive data such as hashed passwords, transactions, and contact-related information.

As per the reports, multiple attempts made by Lynx to report the data breaches to Slickwraps were blocked by the company. Even though Lynx made it clear that they don't want any bounty and are just trying to get Slickwraps to publicly disclose the breach.

In a post made by Lynx on Medium, he stated, "They had no interest in accepting security advice from me. They simply blocked and ignored me."

While accepting the shortcomings of the company in terms of user security, Jonathan Endicott, Slickwraps CEO, apologized for the data breach and said, "There is nothing we value higher than trust from our users. In fact, our entire business model is dependent on building long-term trust with customers that keep coming back."

"We are reaching out to you because we've made a mistake in violation of that trust. On February 21st, we discovered information in some of our production databases was mistakenly made public via an exploit. During this time, the databases were accessed by an unauthorized party."

"Upon finding out about the public user data, we took immediate action to secure it by closing any database in question. As an additional security measure, we recommend that you reset your Slickwraps account password. Again, no passwords were compromised, but we recommend this as a standard safety measure. Finally, please be watchful for any phishing attempts."

"We are deeply sorry about this oversight. We promise to learn from this mistake and will make improvements going forward. This will include enhancing our security processes, improving the communication of security guidelines to all Slickwraps employees, and making more of our user-requested security features our top priority in the coming months. We are also partnering with a third-party cybersecurity firm to audit and improve our security protocols."

"More details will follow and we appreciate your patience during this process." the statement further read.

SoPo Nonprofit Told, Unknown Number of Clients Affected by Data Breach


A South Australian company, PSL Services, also known as Peregrine Corporation involved in the operation of service stations, convenience retail outlets and tobacconists recently disclosed a data breach to Mainebiz.

The company administered from its head office in Kensington Park, South Australia told that personal data of its employees including their names, email accounts, some medical information along with other sensitive information may have been accessed illegally between December 16 and December 19, 2019. Other information accessed without authorization includes address, DOB, Driving License Number, Social Security Number and Identifying Numbers of clients for participation in Mainecare.

There have been no speculations made by the corporation as to who is behind the public breach of its confidential data, however, the officials told in an email that there are chances that the criminal behind the incident was trying to force the agency in sending funds electronically which they did not.

Post-incident, the company was subjected to back to back investigations and it refused to specify the number of employees being affected. PSL did not provide other details regarding the incident such as whether the individuals were clients, employees, family members or others. As per some news releases, PSL came to know about the breach on 17th December after some suspicious activity was observed in an employee's email account, it immediately reported the same to its information services department.

The corporation told that it had “notified the Office of Civil Rights at U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Maine Attorney General, and prominent news media outlets throughout the state of Maine."

Referencing from the statements given by Lori Sanville, executive director, “The contents of a small number of email accounts were exposed,”

“The number is unknown until the data mining is completed. We will then contact anyone affected.”

In regard of the same incident, PSL also contracted with a cybersecurity vendor to further investigate the matter and come up with security measures, as per Sanville. In addition, she told Mainebiz, “We want our clients and the community to know that we take this matter very seriously and that we remain committed to assisting our clients first and foremost."