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Private Firm Employee arrested for Data Theft in Bengaluru



Bengaluru: Kamin Prajapathi (40), a senior accountant manager in a multinational software company was arrested by the police on Sunday for data theft.

The accused, a resident of Concorde Napa Valley and Kanakapura Road and Bihar stole the data of nearly 300 employees working in the same company, transferring their bank details, credit card details and bank account details to his personal mail.

Prajapathi started working in the company from August 2017 and quit his job in April 2019 though the police said that before resigning he transferred the stolen data to his personal mail with plans to hand the data to another company for a senior-level position. He told the company, he had surplus confidential data that they could use to their advantage and build their business.

KS Santosh, founder of a cybersecurity solutions firm 'Group Cyber ID', says these type of data theft are pretty common, “These frauds occur in startups, where former employees steal data from the startup and begin their own firm using the data. Many companies have filed data theft complaints against individuals,” (Sc Indiatimes.com)

Likewise, Prajapathi allegedly hacked into the website of the company where he worked and is suspected that he had been stealing data since 2017 and selling it to other companies. Aside from the bank details of employees and clients, he also collected pivotal data of the company's clients.

The managers from the private firm, where he previously worked lodged a complaint at the cyber-crime police station, and after a probe the police nabbed Prajapathi confiscating his laptop, CPU and mobile phone. The cyber-crime officials also found an account created by Prajapathi on a web-based email service as solid evidence against him.

There has been a significant rise in data theft cases in the last few years as reliance on digital platforms increase. In the city itself, there have been cases where the miscreants hacked into the system using simple hacking techniques, and thus it is crucial to install effective data security solutions to protect the privacy and curtail cybercrime.

Sberbank employee confesses he is the culprit behind the customer data leakage


Recall that on Thursday, Sberbank reported a possible leak of credit card accounts, which affects at least 200 customers of the Bank. According to media reports, at the weekend on one of the forums, which was blocked by Roskomnadzor (Federal Service for Supervision in the Sphere of Telecom, Information Technologies and Mass Communications), there were messages about the sale of personal data of Bank customers. The authors of the announcement indicated that they have access to data of 60 million cards.

Sberbank assured that the funds of its customers are safe because credit card accounts that do not have CVV codes, as well as logins and passwords from the Internet Bank were in the public domain. So, fraudsters can not steal money from the cards.

According to German Gref, President of Sberbank, Sberbank employees learned about the incident on the day of the leak, October 2: an ad was found with personal data of employees. After that, the employee of security service of Sberbank contacted an attacker trying to sell the stolen data.

During the conversation, it became clear that we are talking about an internal leak, Gref said.

According to a statement on the Bank’s website, "as a result of the internal investigation, the security service of the Bank in cooperation with law enforcement agencies, on October 4, 2019, identified an employee of the Bank born in 1991, the head of the sector in one of the business units of the Bank, who had access to databases and who tried to steal customer information for selfish purposes," the message on the Bank's website reads. The culprit of the leak faces criminal liability.

The leak indirectly affected the data of 200 cardholders of Sberbank, which have already been reissued, so " the owners have nothing to worry about," Gref said. He noted that the reissue took only two days.

Gref also apologized to customers and thanked them, noting their calmness.

The Russian security guard arrested for stealing login credentials of Gamers and selling them


The court began consideration of the case of a hacker from Novosibirsk, who was engaged in the theft of credentials gaming accounts right at the workplace in the Novosibirsk State Agrarian University, where he worked as a security guard. Data was subsequently sold over the Internet. The security guard was engaged in this activity not less than half a year.

31-year-old former employee of a private security company for six months combined his hacker activity with work as a university security guard, this continued until January 2019. According to the materials of the case, the man downloaded hacker programs for stealing logins and passwords for popular gaming platforms, including Steam and the Rockstar Games and Electronic Arts services.

The hacker sold the received data through the FunPay electronic exchange. The investigation was unable to establish the exact number of hacked accounts, but tracked the payment received by the hacker on the site. However, the business did not have high profitability, since in six months the hacker was able to earn only about 1.7 thousand rubles ($26).

The security guard was caught by the FSB officers, calculating the origin of computer attacks by IP-address. The accused has fully admitted his guilt. Prosecutor's office demands for him two years suspended sentence, without payment of a fine.

It is worth noting that this is not the first time in recent years, when a hacker appears in court in the case of hacking accounts with special software. For example, in June 2019, a hacker from Chelyabinsk was sentenced to 10 months in prison for hacking personal accounts of users in payment systems and accounts in social networks with the help of malware. But the hacker did not manage to steal money from the victims.

Bengaluru's Police Accounts Hacked: Culprits changed Twitter ID’s



BENGALURU: In the last four days, five of Bengaluru’s Traffic Police Twitter accounts have been cracked where the hacker alleged access to the accounts, posting spams and changing their usernames.

While the police exhort about strengthening cyber security and the need to use strong unique passwords to safeguard online accounts, their own accounts are being hacked by simple password guessing techniques.

Jayanagar Traffic Police was the first account to be hacked at around 10 pm on Friday, followed by ACP South East Division and soon KR Puram, Shivajinagar and Airport traffic police twitter accounts too were hacked by Sunday.

This is not the first time when Bengaluru’s traffic police have been made a victim of cyber crime - Elliot Alderson, a French based hacker broke into the city’s traffic police website in march this year exposing directories. Even other government sites are not well protected, the Aeronautical Development Agency’s (ADA) TRACES account of the Income Tax Department was hacked with impunity with the culprit still unidentified.

Though, in this case, the culprits simply second-guessed common passwords. A man called up various traffic police stations, claiming to be from the IT Department and asked account details and passwords to reset them. It is suspected that one of the staff members fell for the con and shared the password.

The black hat tried the password on other accounts and voila, it worked!

After breaching their twitter handles, the miscreants posted spam messages from these accounts and changed their usernames resulting in Shivnagar Traffic police handle being renamed as ‘SHIVAJINAGAR CINEMA’ and KR Puram became ‘KR PURAM T BOLIWOOD’.

These consequences could have been avoided by quick thinking and strong passwords. Cyber security experts repeatedly identify the use of strong, unique passwords so that malicious cyber threats can’t find or guess your password. SplashData, a password security company estimates that approximately 10% of individuals used at least one of the 25 worst passwords on this year's list, and approximately 3% used the worst — 123456.

Additional commissioner of police (traffic) BR Ravikanthe Gowda said they have filed a complaint with city cyber crime police and told officials to immediately change passwords to secure their accounts (quoting TOI). They also reported the hacking to twitter awaiting a response.

An officer said they are unable to take back control of their accounts on grounds of lack of trained men for the job.

Bengaluru has only one cyber crime police station with a tally of 8,200 cases this year, though to open more of these has been repeatedly proposed to no effect.

Milwaukee Couple's Nest Smart Home Hacked, Vulgar Music was Played


Smart home products designed by Nest such as smart cameras, smart displays, smart thermostats, and smart doorbells to make our lives more comfortable and safe, may not be all that safe according to a horrifying incident reported by a Milwaukee, Wisconsin based couple, Samantha and Lamont Westmoreland.

 After a hacker hacked into the couple’s home and took control of their gadgets, Samantha said, "It's (installation of gadgets) supposed to make me feel safe, and I didn't feel safe", "My heart was racing, I felt so violated at that point."

As per a report by Fox 6 News, on September 17th, Samantha returned home in which she has Nest camera, a doorbell and a thermostat installed, and found the atmosphere unreasonably warmer, she immediately noticed that her smart thermostat has risen up to 32 degrees Celsius (90 degrees Fahrenheit).

Initially, she assumed it to be a glitch and set it back to the room temperature, but it kept on going up after every time she turned it down. A while later, the couple heard a voice talking to them from their Nest camera and afterward it played vulgar music. Samantha went ahead, unplugged the camera and turned it to face the ceiling. They changed the passwords of all the three devices but as the issues persisted, they resorted to contacting their internet service provider to have their network and Ids reset.

The couple was of the opinion that their Wi-Fi network and Nest camera was hacked, putting the actual problem into perspective, Lamont Westmoreland said, "If someone hacks into your Wi-Fi, they shouldn't be able to have access to those Nest devices without some sort of wall they have to get over,"

In a conversation with Fox 6 News, the couple revealed that the smart home accessories they had installed at their home since last year, cost them $700, and that they have never faced any problem before this; however, in the wake of this terrifying incident they had a change of mind regarding smart home devices.

Meanwhile, responding to the disturbing experience, a spokesperson of Google, told a media outlet, “Nest was not breached. These reports are based on customers using compromised passwords. In nearly all cases, two-factor verification eliminates this type of security risk,"

Russian hacker accused the ex-employee of Kaspersky Lab of forced hacking


Hacker, who has been in the pretrial detention center for the fifth year, made a statement to the head of the Investigative Committee of Russia. He insists that his case was fabricated with the participation of a Kaspersky Lab convicted of high treason along with FSB officers.

Russian hacker Dmitry Popelysh, accused of stealing money from the accounts of Sberbank and VTB together with his twin brother Eugene, said that he sent a complaint to the head of the Russian Investigative Committee. According to the hacker, the criminal case against him and his twin brother was fabricated.

The hacker said that ex-employee of Kaspersky Lab Stoyanov blackmailed and threatened him. Later, he demanded that brothers Popelysh provide technical support to some servers.

It is reported that mentions of an unknown employee who forced the hackers to commit hacks is in the surrender of Popelysh for 2015. However, this information was not verified by the investigation.

Previously, Stoyanov was the head of the computer incident investigation Department at Kaspersky Lab. He also participated in the examination of case of Popelysh.

The representative of Kaspersky Lab told that the company is not aware of Dmitry Popelysh’s appeal to the Investigative Committee.

Recall that in 2012 the brothers Popelysh were convicted of embezzlement of 13 million rubles from customers of banks. In 2015, they were again detained and accused of creating and actively using malware. According to the case, the men stole about 12.5 million rubles ($195,000) in two years. In the summer of 2018, they were sentenced to eight years. In 2019, the sentence was canceled in connection with "violations committed during the preliminary investigation." In total, they have been detained for four years and four months.

It is interesting to note that Dmitry Popelysh is already the second Russian hacker who publicly stated that experts investigating his criminal case forced him to commit hacks. Konstantin Kozlovsky, who has been in a pretrial detention center since May 2016 on charges of organizing a hacker group Lurk, claimed that he was recruited by FSB in 2008 and done various cyber attacks for a long time. He also mentioned that his supervisor was FSB major Dmitry Dokuchaev.

JPMorgan hacker to plead guilty next week in New York




One of the key suspects in the enormous JPMorgan Chase hack in 2014, a Russian hacker Andrei Tyurin, is all set to plead next week in New York.

He was one of the several people charged for the case in 2015, and was on the loose until Georgian officials caught hold of him a year ago. Gery Shalon, the supposed instigator of the conspiracy, was arrested in Israel in 2015 and handed over to the US as he has allegedly been in touch with American authorities.

During Tyurin's first New York court appearance; it was proposed that his associations in the criminal world may enable specialists to examine the Russian endeavours to disrupt the 2016 US presidential election through cyber-attacks and hacking.

Tyurin was first produced in a US court in September the previous year after he was handed over from the Republic of Georgia and he had pleaded not guilty to charges including hacking, wire fraud, identity theft and conspiracy.

From that point forward, various hearings for his situation have been cancelled as prosecutors and defence attorneys worked through for an agreement and just last week, the Manhattan US attorney's office endeavoured to solidify his New York case with one in Atlanta, in which he is one of the few accused for hacking E*Trade.

Hacker ordered to pay back £922k

A hacker who carried out cyber attacks on more than 100 companies has been ordered to pay back £922,978.14 of cryptocurrency.

Grant West had been jailed for fraud after carrying out attacks on brands such as Sainsbury's, Uber and Argos.

A police investigation, codename "Operation Draba", uncovered West's activity on the dark web under the moniker of "Courvoisier".

The confiscation order was made during a hearing at Southwark Crown Court.

West, from Sheerness, Kent, used phishing email scams to obtain the financial data of tens of thousands of customers.

He would then sell this personal data in different market places on the dark web, convert the profit made from selling financial details online into cryptocurrency, and store these in multiple accounts.

West, of Ashcroft Caravan Park, was jailed in May at Southwark Crown Court for 10 years and eight months.

Detectives had discovered evidence of West conducting cyber attacks on the websites of 17 major firms.

Following West's arrest, approximately £1m in cryptocurrency was seized from a number of his accounts. Taking currency fluctuations into account the currency is today valued at £922, 978.14.

The cryptocurrency will now be sold and the victims will receive compensation.

As well as financial data, he also sold cannabis which he shipped to customers, and "how to" guides instructing others how to carry out cyber attacks.

West also regularly used stolen credit card details to pay for items for himself, including holidays, food, shopping and household goods. West admitted conspiracy to defraud, possession of criminal property, unauthorised modification of computer material and various drugs offences.

Windows Users Beware of the “Complete Control” Hack Attack; Update Imperative!





The hardware device drivers of Microsoft Windows due to a common design flaw left the entire systems of users compromised giving it to a recently resuscitated Remote Tojan Access (RAT).

The RAT brought about a hack attack tool with a modified format which as it turns out is absolutely free of cost.

The NanoCore RAT as it’s called, has been hovering around the dark web for quite some time now. It was sold initially for $25 which is a minimal amount for a hacking tool for Windows OS.

NanoCore’s cracked version, as soon as it appeared caused quite a commotion amongst researchers and hackers.

Initially the “premium plugins” were especially paid for privileges but the latest cracked version has it all for free.

The NanoCore coder had to be arrested given the rising familiarity of the product and the fact that he was a part cybercrime!
Despite that, NanoCore thrived and generated other tool variants RAT, Surprise Ransomware, LuminosityLink and of course the free “highly modified” latest version.

The NanoCore RAT, per researchers is controlled by way of easy security measures, no particular entry troubles and a really uncomplicated interface to aid even the novice hackers.

There was an outburst of campaigns using the very malware including:
·       Remote shutdown and restart of Windows systems
·       Remote file browsing on the infected system
·       Access and control of Task Manager, mouse and Registry editor
·       Disabling webcam lights to spy
·       Taking over open webpages
·       Recovering passwords and obtaining credentials
·       Remotely operated “locker” for encryption

Owing it to the long presence of NanoCore the techniques it uses are well known to the researchers. Scripting, registry keys and malicious attachments are the three main categories that the researchers found out.


The scripting threat’s basic solution is to check Microsoft office files for macro code and “anomalous execution” of legitimate scripting programs like PowerShell or Wscript.

The registry keys should be monitored for updates and patch cycles and rigorous security implementations should be made for behavioural detection.

Windows users should immediately go ahead and get their systems updated and make sure all their applications are running the way they actually should.

Additionally, Windows 10, 8.1 and 7 users should especially keep a keen check on regular updates and patching!

Phishing Attacks: Via Scraping Branded Microsoft Login Pages!


Phishing Attacks: Via Scraping Branded Microsoft Login Pages!



The latest phishing attack attacks using the targets’ company-branded Microsoft 365 tenant login pages just to make it look more believable.

Microsoft’s Azure Blob Storage and the Azure Web Sites cloud storage solutions are also under usage for finding solutions to host their phishing landing pages.

This helps the users think that they’re seeing a legitimate Microsoft page. This aids the cyber-con to target Microsoft users and get their services credentials.

This phishing campaign is mostly about scraping organizations’ branded Microsoft 365 tenant login pages just to fool the targets.

The above observations were made as a part of s research of the Rapid7’s Managed Detection and Response (MDR) service team, say sources.

The cyber-criminals actually go through the list of validated email addresses before they plan on redirecting the victims to the phony login pages.

They put up actual looking logos of the brands that they want to copy and that’s what helps them to scrape the tenant login page.

In case the target organization doesn’t have a custom branded tenant page, the phishing kit is designed to make use of the default office 365 background.

The same campaign’s been launched at various different companies and organizations including in financial, insurance, telecom, energy and medical sectors.


There are several points at hand that hint at the phishing campaign still being active. In fact someone may be updating it for that matter at different times.

The “phisher” behind the campaign could easily be exploiting the “Lithuanian infrastructure”.

Besides the using the phony Microsoft phony page and stealing credentials the campaign also is up for exploiting cloud storage services.

For landing page hostings also, the campaign works perfectly. Phishing kits were discovered in April this year.

IPFs gateways were also abused by phishing attempts by using TLS certificates issued by Cloudflare, last year in October.

Per sources, the following advises and measures should be taken at once by organizations using the Microsoft office 365:
·       Multi-factor authentication via Office 365 or a third party solution for all employees.
·       Enrolling staff in phishing awareness training programs.
·       Training to help the employees spot and report phishing attacks.

Hackers Can Intercept What’s Being Typed Just By The Sound Of It?




Hack Alert! Hackers could listen to the sound of typing on a person’s phone via a nearby smartphone and intercept what’s being typed.

Possibly, the acoustic signals or sound waves produced when a message is typed on a computer or a keyboard could be picked up by a smartphone.

The sound could later be processed leading an expert hacker to easily decode which keys were hit and ultimately what was it that was typed.
 
Allegedly, this trick could work in a busy hall filled with people chattering and typing as well, because researchers tried it out.

Sources mention that the researchers could intercept what’s being typed with a “41% word accuracy rate”. It might take only a couple of seconds to know what’s being typed.

The results of the research sure are disconcerting and privacy and security levels of the smartphones and their sensors have got to be taken to a higher level.

From detecting if a phone is still or in a pocket, to detecting if it’s on the move; with the enhanced technology, sensors too have come a long way.



Some sensors need permission whereas most of them are set to function as a default. Per sources, the researchers had in their analysis used the later.

All they did was develop an application that could intercept the sound of typing and detect which key exactly is hit.

According to researchers the material of the table at which the keyboard is placed, plays a crucial role in the entire process as the keys sound different on different materials.

Fraudsters claiming to be from Bank and offers to assist you via TeamViewer


In Russia, a new way of telephone fraud is gaining momentum. Attackers disguised as a bank employee calls to Bank’s client to suspend a financial transaction but do not require to tell confidential data of Bank cards. They claim that the credit institution identified an attempt to the unauthorized withdrawal of funds from an account in another region.

As a result, the scammers report that they blocked the attempt to withdraw money, and offer to verify the devices that have access to the personal account of the client. Then attackers will find out if the client uses the Android or IOS operating system. Subsequently, the attackers offer to help disable the system, which is not used by the client, using the TeamViewer access delegation program.

The TeamViewer access delegation program allows an outsider to connect and perform any operation on your behalf. Fraudsters need to find out from the Bank's client their user id so that attackers can easily connect and take possession of confidential smartphone information. In this case, it will be extremely difficult, if not impossible to prove an attempt at unauthorized hacking. After all, the Bank's client voluntarily provided access.

It is worth noting that previously a number of large credit organizations recorded a sharp increase in fraudulent calls to customers from banks using the technology of number substitution. In some banks, the activity of fraudsters has increased tenfold.

The banks indicate that telecom operators are not effectively detecting and blocking such schemes. The solution to the problem came to the level of the Central Bank.

It is interesting to note that on August 10, the Central Bank of Russia recommended banks to inform payment systems of the number of the Bank card, account or mobile phone of the recipient. This should help identify fraudsters and block transactions. The requirements relate to P2P transfers and transfers, where a third Bank is involved, as well as payment systems.

If banks and payment systems follow the Central Bank's recommendations, data on the recipient of funds will be sent to the FinCERT (center for monitoring and responding to computer attacks in the financial sphere of the General Directorate of protection and information security at the Bank of Russia).

According to the leading anti-virus expert of Kaspersky Lab Sergey Golovanov, indicating the phone number will track cases when one person has issued many accounts for his number and uses them to transfer funds using social engineering.

Apps Generating Untraceable International Phone Numbers ?






Applications that generate international phone numbers that are super difficult to track are being employed by cyber criminals to rip people off.

A recent victim that had called the cyber-crime branch complained that they received a call from two spate numbers one with 001 and the other with 0063 as the country codes.

Per sources the app stores happen to contain 40 to 60 such apps through which cyber-cons could easily get these numbers.

Sources mentioned that allegedly “Dingtone” is an app via which a user can easily sift through a variety of country codes which are absolutely untraceable.

These cases according to the cyber-crime branch aren’t categorized separately but these are surely being registered and deliberated upon.



According to the cyber-security researchers a minimum of 500 cases come into existence per day in India alone with 40 cases pinning on major cities.

The police lack the technological efficiency as well as resources to possibly track the users of such applications. There is also a matter of jurisdiction.

Mostly, the above-mentioned apps are ‘not’ developed by Indian initiators but ironically originated from countries that have strict laws on removal of apps.

Information of the caller could seemingly be obtained by requesting the telecom service providers as such services are always linked together.

However, requesting the details of the callers from a telecom service provider abroad is extremely time-consuming. Besides, the CBI would require Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty with that very country.

As of now, such treaties exist with only 39 countries. In addition some countries could also demand a court order and furthermore the procedure in itself takes six to eighteen months.

A Bunch of Loopholes in Apple’s iMessage App?


Apple’s devices could be vulnerable to attacks owing it to a few flaws that the researchers have uncovered in its iMessage app.

Where, in one case, the extent of severity of the attack happens to be so large that the only way to safe-guard the device would be to delete all data on it.

The other case saw some files being copied off the device without needing the user to do anything. The fixes were released last week by Apple.

But somehow there was a problem which couldn’t be fixed in the updates, which was brought to the attention of the company by the researchers.

Google’s Project Zero Team was established in July 2014 with an aim to dig all the “previously undocumented cyber vulnerabilities”.

Samaung, Microsoft, Facebook and a few others were warned off by this team regarding the problems in their code.

The unrepaired flaw, according to Apple’s own sources could aid the hackers to crash an app or execute commands of its own accord on iPads, iPhones and iPod Touches.

Installation of new version of the iOS (iOS 12.4) has been strongly advised by the organization. The attacks/dangers could be easily handled by keeping the software up-to-date.

Hike in Banking Malware Attacks; Mobile Malware A Part of Cyber-Crime Too!



Banking malware is on a rise and the percentage of the wreckage it causes has risen up to 50%.

The viral banking malware usually is on the lookout for payment data, credentials and of course, cash.

Development kits for mobile malware code are easily available on underground portals and hence this issue is relevant.

The creators of mobile bankers henceforth allow the fabrication of new versions of malware that could be distributed on an enormous scale.

Ramnit (28%), Trickbot (21%) and Ursnif (10%) are apparently the most widely known types of the malware.

Mobile malware happens to be pretty difficult to identify and equally so to deal with as they use similar malicious techniques that are applied on computers.

The variants of the malware that were recurrently identified by the anti-virus solutions were Android-bound Triada (30%), Lotoor (11%) and Hidad (7%).

Turning the anti-malware off, using transparent icons with empty application labels, delayed execution to bypass sandboxes, and encrypting the malicious payload are a few of the evasion techniques being employed, per sources.

Equifax Paying Settlement around $700 Million after Massive Data Breach


Almost two years ago, Equifax suffered a massive data breach which exposed a significant amount of sensitive data of over 143 million Americans, the compromised information included that of driving licenses, social security numbers, and addresses of the victims. 

It has been uncovered by The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times that the consumer credit reporting agency is closing in on a settlement with FTC, state attorneys general, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau along with state and federal agencies. Equifax could settle up with $650 to $700 million, out of which it has put aside $690 million for the purpose of penalty. 

As per the media findings, the amount is expected to differ on the basis of the number of people filing claims and the details of the same will be released on Monday.

Notably, the settlement entails terms to devise a separate fund for the purpose of settlement, however, the amount victim's could expect in compensation is still a matter of question.

Commenting on the matter, Equifax CEO, Richard Smith, said, “At this critical juncture, I believe it is in the best interests of the company to have new leadership to move the company forward,” as he decided to retire in the wake of the cyberattack. 



Cyber Extortionist Pretends To Be From US Police; Demands $2000 in Bitcoin To Delete Evidence!







A cyber extortionist acts to be a US State Police detective and promises to delete child porn evidence for $2,000 in Bitcoins including a phone number which could be used to contact the scammer.

“Sextortion” emails have become quite common where the sender cites that the recipient’s computer has been hacked with the recording of them while on the adult sites.

On the other hand extortionists pretend to be hitmen and asking for money to call off the hit, bomb threats and tarnishing website’s reputation.


The aforementioned extortionist accuses the victim of child pornography and that the evidence could be deleted if they pay the sender $2,000 in Bitcoins.

Florida, Minnesota, Georgia, Tennessee, California and New York are a few of the states where the victims mentioned that the mails they got were from.

Per sources, the email sent by the extortionists pretending to be from the Tennessee State Police included the following phrases:
·       “Do not ignore the important warning”
·       “I work in the Bureau of Criminal Investigation, detective branch Crime Prevention with child abuse.”
·       “You uploaded video child-porno to websites”
·       “not possible to prove you didnt this”
·       “I retire in next month and want to earns some money for self”
·       “Pay me to Bitcoin wallet”
·       “This is anonymous money I want 2000$”
·       “Send transfer to my wallet”
·       “My temporary phone to contact”
·       “After receiving payments, I delete All materials”
·       “If you don’t pay me, I sending materials to The Tennessee Crime Laboratory.”

All the emails happen to be the same, the same Bitcoin address 17isAHrP2cZSY8vpJrTs8g4MHc1FDXvAMu


 but just the state’s name different.

The attacker(s) is/are using a data breach dump which contains both email and home address so that the state in the email could be matched up with the target’s state of residence.

Extortion scams don’t usually contain the scammers contact number and matching the state of residence with that in the email is surely a nice touch there.

But whenever an email turns up where the sender asks for money it’s obviously to be aborted.

Ransomware and their Proliferation; Major Cyber-Crime Hazards In View





Per latest reports, all around the globe, only last year we faced a hike in losses that occur due to malicious activities or cyber-crime.

Only earlier this year, cities Baltimore and Maryland of U.S. were attacked by a ransomware where computer networks got locked up and made making transactions impossible.

The administrators denied the demands for a ransom of $76,000 in exchange for unlocking systems but now have been encumbered with an estimate of $18 million to rebuild and/or restore the city’s’ computer networks.

Usually when hit by ransomware or any other malicious agent there are some pretty hard-hitting choices that the victim organizations have to face.

Two Florida cities had to pay a sum total of $1 million as ransom this year after which the same malicious group attacked the state court of Georgia.

The above data of losses generating from ransomware attacks rising by 60% was cited by the Internet Society’s Online Trust Alliance.

Since 2013, around 170 county, city and state government networks have been victims with 22 incidents being only this year.

The cities are not prepared against cyber-crime and hence are being repeatedly attacked as mentioned by a researcher at Stanford.

To pay or not to pay? This is a raging question when it comes to ransoms. FBI warns against it but researchers say that there is no clear side that could be chosen by victims who have their important data locked.

It hence becomes obvious that what needs to be done is what happens to be the best for the organization which means considering paying ransom in some cases.

To or not to pay is secondary where primary issue still happens to be with the software updates and lack of backups and security measures the users take.


Forensic services firm pays ransom after cyber-attack

The UK's biggest provider of forensic services has paid a ransom to criminals after its IT systems were disrupted in a cyber-attack, BBC News has learned.

Eurofins Scientific was infected with a ransomware computer virus a month ago, which led British police to suspend work with the global testing company.

At the time, the firm described the attack as "highly sophisticated".

BBC News has not been told how much money was involved in the ransom payment or when it was paid.

The National Crime Agency (NCA) said it was a "matter for the victim" as to whether a ransom had been paid.

The agency, which is investigating the attack, said: "As there is an ongoing criminal investigation, it would be inappropriate to comment."

Eurofins previously said the attack was "well-resourced" but three weeks later said its operations were "returning to normal".

Cyber-attack hits police forensic work

It said it would also not comment on whether a ransom had been paid or not.

It added it was "collaborating with law enforcement" in the UK and elsewhere.

The ransomware attack hit the company, which accounts for over half of forensic science provision in the UK, on the first weekend in June.

Ransomware is a computer virus that prevents users from accessing their system or personal files. Messages sent by the perpetrators demand a payment in order to unlock the frozen accounts.

Eurofins deals with over 70,000 criminal cases in the UK each year.

It carries out DNA testing, toxicology analysis, firearms testing and computer forensics for police forces across the UK.

Forensic science work has been carried out by private firms and police laboratories in England and Wales since the closure of the government's Forensic Science Service in 2012.

'Court hearings postponed'

An emergency police response to the cyber-attack was led by the National Police Chiefs' Council (NPCC) to manage the flow of forensic submissions so DNA and blood samples which needed urgent testing were sent to other suppliers.

Fake “Samsung UPDATES” App Deceives Millions!





Millions of Samsung users were massively misled by an “updates” app which actually has nothing to do with Samsung.  The app tried to harvest money in exchange for security updates.


The app was spotted by a group of researchers on the Google Play Store which was targeting Android users and the ones with Samsung phones in particular.

The app which has now been taken down would take the users to ad-filled pages and ask them for money in return for security updates and firmware.

Per the report shared by the malware analyst who discovered the application, the malware app was named “Updates for Samsung” and was installed by more than 10 million users.


The fake application lured the users in by claiming to make available free and paid Samsung updates whereas Samsung never actually charges for its legitimate firmware updates.

In addition the report cites that the app suggested the users a free download for a limited speed of 56KBps and took around 4 hours to get the 500MB download done with it, only to time-out at the end and fail.

Then of course the other option would be a premium annual subscription to download the updates with fast speed for around $34.99 (Rs. 2,400.76). Also, the app would pop a lot of ads and ask for payment to remove them.

In the list of all the “amazing provisions” of the aforementioned app, another was SIM card unlocking for nay network operator with the starting price of $19.99. (Rs. 1,371.73)

The name of the fake app which was maliciously designed to target the users of Samsung pretty well kept up to the expectations of the cyber-cons and got millions of installations.

The report additionally alluded to the fact that app doesn’t include any malicious code in itself and is simply a tactic which could be used by cyber-cons to fool people.