Search This Blog

Showing posts with label Credential Stuffing. Show all posts

OpenBullet Exploited for Credential Stuffing

 

Credential stuffing, a form of access-related cybercrime, is on the rise and shows no signs of slowing down. Between January 2018 and December 2019, there were 88 billion credential stuffing attacks, according to an Akamai survey.

Credential stuffing is a form of cyberattack in which compromised account credentials are used to obtain unauthorized access to user accounts through large-scale automatic login requests directed towards a web application, usually consisting of lists of usernames and/or email addresses and the corresponding passwords (often from a data breach). Credential stuffing attacks, unlike credential hacking, do not try to brute force or guess any passwords. Using standard web automation software like Selenium, cURL, PhantomJS, or tools built especially for these types of attacks like Sentry MBA, SNIPR, STORM, Blackbullet, and Openbullet, the intruder easily automates the logins for a significant number (thousands to millions) of previously discovered credential pairs. 

Since many users repeat the same username/password combination across different pages, credential stuffing attacks are likely. According to one poll, 81 percent of users have reused a password across two or more sites, and 25% of users use the same password across a number of their accounts. 

OpenBullet is a free web-testing tool that allows users to make particular requests on specific web pages. The open-source tool is available on GitHub and can be used for a variety of activities, including data scraping and sorting, automatic penetration testing, and Selenium unit testing. 

For legitimate reasons, such as penetration testing, the app allows users to try several "login:password" variations as credential brute-force attacks on various websites. Cybercriminals, on the other hand, will use it to find legitimate passwords on various websites for nefarious purposes.

A user can import prebuilt configuration files or configs into OpenBullet, one for each website to be checked. It also has a modular editor for making changes to configurations as desired. This is a required function since websites also make minor changes to the way users link to them in order to combat automatic tools like OpenBullet. OpenBullet's GitHub profile, for example, has a note that the tool should not be used for credential stuffing on websites that the user does not own. 

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) released an advisory in 2017 advising businesses about how to combat credential stuffing, including requiring safe passwords and preventing attacks.

Clothing Brand 'The North Face' Hit By Credential Stuffing Attack, Suffers Data Breach

 

After North Face's website faced a credential stuffing attack, the company has reset the customers' credentials. In a recent cybersecurity incident, North Face informed its customers that it suffered a data breach attack. On its website, the customers can explore through clothing and accessories collection and buy apparel; they can also earn loyalty points when they buy a thing. Further inquiry revealed that hackers attacked The North Face on 8th and 9th October. 

The North Face says, "we strongly encourage you not to use the same password for your account at thenorthface.com that you use on other websites because if one of those other websites is breached, your email address and password could be used to access your account at thenorthface.com. Besides, we recommend avoiding using easy-to-guess passwords." In credential stuffing, hackers attack users who re-use their login credentials for different accounts or platforms. The hackers use ID and passwords stolen from other attacks, for instance, a data breach, and use the credentials for hacking purposes. The hackers use stolen login credentials to gain unauthorized access to websites. The entire process is mostly automatic, and now the hackers have modified their strategies and gained leverage in these types of attacks. 

Hackers have been successful in stealing data from prominent organizations like Dunkin Doughnut. The company suffered two cyberattacks in three months. As per the investigation, The North Face believes that it is probable that the hackers stole user credentials from any other source or website and used that information to attack the company's user accounts. According to StatSocial, The North Face leads the U.S market in the clothing and accessories segment, generating $2 Billion of the total $4 Billion revenue in 2019. 

The company didn't reveal the number of customers attacked; however, SimiliarWeb says that The North Face website had 6.96 Million customers in October. "We do not believe that the attacker obtained information from us that would require us to notify you of a data security breach under applicable law, but we are notifying you of the incident voluntarily, out of an abundance of caution," says The North Face.