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TV Equipment Used To Eavesdrop On Sensitive Satellite Communications


With just £270 ($300) of home television equipment an Oxford University-based security researcher caught terabytes of real-world satellite traffic including sensitive information from “some of the world’s largest organizations.”

The news comes as the number of satellites in the orbit is said to have an increment from around 2,000 today to more than 15,000 by 2030. James Pavur, a Rhodes Scholar and DPhil student at Oxford will detail the attack in a session at the Black Hat security conference toward the beginning of August.

Alongside it Pavur will demonstrate that, "under the right conditions" attackers can easily hijack active meetings by means of the satellite link, a session overview revealed.

While full details of the attack won't be uncovered until the Black Hat conference, a 2019 conference paper published by Pavur gives a 'sneak peek' into a small part of the challenges of security in the satellite communications space.

It seems to all come down into the absence of encryption-in-transit for satellite-based broadband communications.

The May 2019 paper (“Secrets in the Sky: On Privacy and Infrastructure Security in DVB-S Satellite Broadband“) notes: “Satellite transmissions cover vast distances and are subject to speed-of-light latency effects and packet loss which can impair the function of encryption schemes designed for high-reliability terrestrial environments (e.g. by requiring re-transmission of corrupted key materials). Moreover, satellites themselves are limited in terms of computing capabilities, and any on-board cryptographic operation risks trading off with other mission functionality.”

It additionally uncovers how a small portion of the eavesdropping in was led utilizing a “75 cm, flat-panel satellite receiver dish and a TBS-6983 DVB-S receiver….configured to receive Ku-band transmissions between 10,700 MHz and 12,750 MHz”

Pavur grabbed sensitive communications using tools costing less than $300, including a Selfsat H30D Satellite Dish, a TBS 6983 Satellite PCI-E, and a three-meter coaxial cable.

Pavur even focuses on the Digital Video Broadcasting-Satellite (DVB-S) and DVB-S rendition 2 protocols, which transmit information in MPEG-TS format. The paper includes: "A collection of Python utilities… was used to analyze each of these transponders for signs of DVB-based internet transmissions.”

The 2018 experiment takes note of that through manual review of the intercepted traffic, the security researchers distinguished "[traffic] flows associated with electrical power generation facilities”

“Vulnerable systems administration pages and FTP servers were publicly routable from the open internet. This means that an attacker could sniff a session token from a satellite connection, open a web browser, and log in to the plant’s control panel…”

Alongside further details on the attack, Pavur will at Black Hat present an “open-source tool which individual customers can use to encrypt their traffic without requiring ISP involvement.”


Latest "incorruptible" Privacy Method that makes your VPN Out-of-Date


A unique chip that allows computers to send information using a 1-time 'indestructible' connection.

"Experts have made a unique unhackable safety system that is bound to transform the information secrecy," says the University of St Andrews, King Abdullah University of Sciences and Technology (KAUST) and the Center for Unconventional Processes of Sciences (CUP Sciences). The global organization of experts has built a new optical chip that enables the message to be transmitted from the sender to another receiver using a 1-time untraceable transmission that can accomplish 'absolute privacy' as private information is secured as one of the safest means, thanks to the experts. The experts' designed method utilizes silicon chips that carry compact arrangements that are permanently modified to transfer data in a one-time-key that can't be formed again or hijacked by the hackers.



A technology of the future- 
While the present conventional encryption methods permit messages to be transferred instantly, the information can, however, be hacked by quantum algorithms and computers of the future. But, as per the experts' claim, the latest developed technique for encoding information is solid and utilizes present transmission systems. The newly devised method also occupies limited storage on the present computer systems compared to conventional encoded interactions.

“Due to the arrival of more robust and quantum machines and future computers, all present encodings would be deciphered without taking much time, revealing the confidentiality of our existing and past transmission networks that hold much importance. For example, a hacker can save a piece of encoded information that is available now and he can expect the appropriate systems and technologies that can be availed shortly to decrypt the information. Executing large and cost-effective means of world-class safety is a universal enigma," says Dr. Andrea Fratalocchi, Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering at KAUST and Director of the Research.

He further says: Our research, however, has the caliber to resolve the problems of privacy for every individual across the globe. If by any chance this new technique could be executed across the world universally, the hackers would have a hard time trying to break into someone's personal information and would be seeking jobs elsewhere. For the moment, the groups of experts are currently planning to develop business apps for their trademarked technique and are planning to do a demo very soon.