Airbnb Superhost Caught Filming Guests using spy-camera





An Airbnb’s ‘super-host’ has been caught filming his guests with a hidden camera in the bedroom's internet router in east China. 

According to the reports of the South Morning China Post, a woman who goes by the online name Yunfei paid $250 to spend her three nights in a flat Shandong province. As she works in information security, when she entered the flat found motion sensor at the entrance and she came to know that there is something suspicious. 

She started investigating, after checking the TV and smoke detectors for hidden cameras, router caught her attention, and it looked unusual to her. She compared the router to a photo of the same product online and it was clear some modifications had been carried out. Unscrewing the case revealed a hidden camera mounted and facing the bed, while a memory card was hooked up for recording the footage. 

'As soon as I started removing the screws, I knew something was wrong - the screws were very lose,' she told reporters.

She immediately informed the police about the incidence. 

Police quickly tracked down the flat owner, who had been filming his guests since March this year, the report said.

The unnamed host was fined 500 yuan (£56) and sentenced to a 20-day detention for invasion of privacy. 

Airbnb has apologised for the incident and removed the  host's flat immediately  from its home-sharing platform.

Electricity Wastage Leading to a Ban on Cryptocurrency Mining in China



In the wake of cryptocurrency mining being listed as one of the hazardous and wasteful activities by China’s central state planner, the National Development and Reform Commission, Chinese government has decided to ban cryptocurrency mining in the country. China, after remaining the hub of bitcoin mining has now plans drafted to terminate the activity.

The list generated by China’s central state planner included more than 450 activities  which failed to abide by the regulations  and are categorized unsafe for either they lead to a wastage of resources or pollutes the environment.  

Drawing inferences from an anonymous Chinese bitcoin trader, Reuters noted, “Bitcoin mining wastes a lot of electricity,”

Bitcoin, one of the most popular cryptocurrency hit a record high by the end of 2017 and touched $5,000 for the first time ever since November.  This week, it was down by 1.4 percent along with Ripple’s XRP and Ethereum, which fell down by the same margin.

Lately, cryptocurrency has been under inspection in China and eventually, it led to the banning of initial coin offerings and shutting down of local trading exchanges. With electricity being a crucial factor determining the ban, countries with inexpensive electricity have now emerged as the key hosts of cryptocurrency mining.




During ransomware attack, student's GCSE coursework seized

Sir John Colfox Academy, in Bridport, was the target of hackers, believed to be from China, after a member of staff mistakenly opened an email that contained virus and infected the school’s entire computer network. The email claimed to be from a teacher at another Dorset school.

Hackers seized pupil’s GCSE courework of the secondary school and demanded cash or returning it.

The Sir John Colfox Academy has about 1,000 pupils. The coursework was from one subject submitted by Year 11 students, which was saved on the school' system.

Head teacher David Herbert said: "We are liaising with the relevant exam boards about this specific issue."

Police have launched an investigation into the cyber attack.

Neither police nor the school have said how much money was demanded for the return of the coursework, but police say no money has been paid.

Unprotected Database reveals 'BreedReady' Status for 1.8 Million Women




An unprotected database revealed personal information of more than 1.8 million women in China. The data set includes a ""BreedReady" status of the, apart from the regular information like name, age, and date of birth.

The database includes phone numbers, ID numbers,  addresses,   marital status, URLs to photos, GPS coordinates, information about the political affiliation and education related details, and a 'HasVideo' field.

A well-known security researcher Victor Gevers, working with the non-profit GDI Foundation, was the one who got a hold on the unprotected the data trove while he was searching for open databases in China, and he found tens of thousands of them.

He tweeted the screenshot of the database saying, "In China, they have a shortage of women. So an organization started to build a database to start registering over 1,8 million women with all kinds of details like phone numbers, addresses, education,  location, ID number, marital status, and a ”BreedReady" status?"

The researcher stated that in the database the youngest woman with the status 'BreedReady:1' is 18 years old and the oldest is 39. The BreedReady field meant to specify whether the person has children or not.

Most of the women in the database are single (89%) and are based in Beijing. The youngest girl is 15 years old.

Gevers found a total of 18 unprotected databases all are from China, and it has data from six social platforms that are operational in the country. The personal data includes names, ID numbers,  photos, GPS locations, network info, public and private conversations, and file exchanges.




China Launches An App Which Works Like A Debtor Radar!






















Giving apps an absolutely new dimension, China recently launched an app which works like a radar for people who are in debt.


Reportedly this application was developed on the instructions of the Chinese police. The app was created in the Chinese province of Hebei.



The application tends to display the locations of people in debt, whenever the person using the app is within 500 yards of them.



The major inspiration behind the application is the need to report the citizens who spend more than they should.



The application which goes by the name of “Map of Deadbeat Debtors” could be accessed via ‘WeChat’. (A social media app)



It's being claimed that the users are instantly alerted via a flash when they stand within 500 meters of a debtor.



The exact location of the debtor is displayed, if there's any appearance of personal information hasn't been confirmed yet.


It's an initiative which works towards citizens keeping a lookout for potential debtors, regardless of the seriousness of the debt.


  
Apparently, owing a debt is considered inappropriate in the culturally rich country of China.



The new reforms in the social credit system of the country are to be held responsible for the idea of the application.




The latest system is just the thing which the country needs and will judge the citizens on the basis of their social behavior.


Hewlett Packard Enterprise and IBM Networks Breached by China; Clients Targeted




In order to gain access to the clients' computer, hackers of the China's Ministry of State Security breached the networks of Hewlett Packard Enterprise and IBM.

Being a part of the Chinese campaign Cloudhopper, the attacks tainted technology service providers in order to steal secrets from their clients. While the International Business Machines Corp said it had no proof regarding the sensitive corporate data being co promised, Hewlett Packard Enterprises (HPE) simply chose not to comment on the campaign.

Albeit multiple warnings were issued by numerous administration organizations in addition to many cybersecurity firms about the Cloudhopper danger since 2017, the identity of  the technology companies whose networks were imperilled has still not being revealed yet.

As indicated by a U.S. federal indictment of two Chinese nationals unsealed on the 20th of December, Cloudhopper was for the most part centered on targeting the MSPs in order to easily access the client networks and stealing corporate secrets from organizations around the world.

While both IBM and HPE refused to comment on the explicit claims made by the sources, however they did give a statement each,

"IBM has been aware of the reported attacks and already has taken extensive counter-measures worldwide as part of our continuous efforts to protect the company and our clients against constantly evolving threats. We take responsible stewardship of client data very seriously, and have no evidence that sensitive IBM or client data has been compromised by this threat."

HPE said,"The security of HPE customer data is our top priority. We are unable to comment on the specific details described in the indictment, but HPE's managed services provider business moved to DXC Technology in connection with HPE's divestiture of its Enterprise Services business in 2017." 

Reuters was neither able affirm the names of other breached technology firms nor recognize any affected users.

Cloudhopper, which has been focusing on technology services providers for quite a long while, is known to have been penetrated the systems of HPE and IBM on numerous occasions in breaches that have gone on for a considerable length of time.

While IBM examined an attack as of late as this mid-year, HPE was not far behind as it directed a huge breach investigation in mid-2017.


OnePlus denies accusation of sending Clipboard data to China

OnePlus had been accused of sending Clipboard data taken from OnePlus phones in the latest OxygenOS Beta version to China and has now denied the accusations, saying that the file is inactive and created for Chinese phones only.

The information was first revealed by Elliot Alderson on Twitter, where he explained how the application works.

He posted that a strange file called badword.txt existed in the clipboard application, along with 6 others, for the OxygenOS Beta update which could identify what kind of data the user copied to their clipboard and send sensitive data such as bank information and passwords to a Chinese server, allegedly pointing to a Chinese company called Teddy Mobile.

OnePlus has since denied this accusation and released a statement saying that "there’s been a false claim that the Clipboard app has been sending user data to a server. The code is entirely inactive in the open beta for OxygenOS, our global operating system. No user data is being sent to any server without consent in OxygenOS."

They added that the identified folder exists in the open beta for HydrogenOS, their operating system for China exclusively, in order to filter out what data to not upload and that local data in this folder is skipped over and not sent to any server.