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Aurora Cannabis Breach Exposes Personal Data of Former, Current Workers

 

Recently, Marijuana Business Daily has disclosed a data breach at Aurora Cannabis. The security incident compromised the credential information of an unknown number of employees of the Canadian company. The data breach was not restricted to the current employees of the company but also encompassed the former employees as well. 

A victim has shared an email of a data breach with Marijuana Business Daily which was sent to him on Dec. 25, “cybersecurity incident during which unauthorized parties accessed data in (Microsoft cloud software) SharePoint and OneDrive.” The email read. 

The victim, a former employee of Aurora Company who was terminated in February 2020 with other hundreds of employees, didn’t get notification of the breach until late December 31. The source said that working for Alberta-based Aurora was “an experience that I think a lot of people want to forget.” 

“And then getting a reminder on the last day of 2020, just hours to go before 2020 ended, was just a bit of a kick to the face,” he further added. The former employee said that he had talked with three present workers at Aurora and five other former employees about the information that has been exposed. Each of them reported a different kind of data breach, some reported breach of their credit card information and government identification, while others said that their home address and banking details were exposed, he added. 

The company’s spokeswoman Michelle Lefler has confirmed that the company “was subject to a cybersecurity incident” on Christmas Eve. It has affected both present and former employees of the company. 

As of now, it remains unclear what "kinds" of personal information were exposed. “The company immediately took steps to mitigate the incident, is actively consulting with security experts and cooperating with authorities,” Lefler wrote in a statement. 

“Aurora’s patient systems were not compromised, and the company’s network of operations is unaffected.” Further, she added, for now, I am unable to provide the specific number of Aurora employees whose data was exposed. I can confirm we are following all security protocols, are working with privacy councils and law enforcement, and have communicated directly with any impacted current or former employee,” Lefler added.

"Not Amazon" Canadian Website Takes on the Online Giant

The e-commerce giants, with their evidently endless collection and drive to deliver convenience along with affordable prices, have become an all-too-familiar and essential service for many consumers at the height of the ongoing global pandemic. 

While small businesses and local retailers have been ending up with nothing in this pandemic, the worldwide lockdowns, and restrictions, have been fruitful for the e-commerce market, especially for the Seattle-based e-commerce giant Amazon, which has made humongous profits in billions. 

The pandemic has proved as mounting inequity between people and markets, and it was brought into focus by Ali Haberstroh. As the pandemic deepened, offline markets were closed but online shopping continued which consequently created inequality that was highlighted by one Canadian woman who expressed her disapproval as she fought back for the cause. 

“I just hate how much Jeff Bezos and Amazon are making billions off the backs of working-class people,” said Ali Haberstroh. “It seems to me they’re putting money over the wellbeing of people.” 

It was in late November 2020 when the snow was painting Ali Haberstroh’s apartment into a white house when the idea occurred to her. At the time, Canada was about to shut the market again as the second wave of lockdown hit the Canadian lanes in an attempt to curb rising COVID-19 cases. 
In anticipation, Toronto’s vintage clothing owner who is a friend of Ms. Haberstroh’s had put together names of other local vintage shops offering product curbside pickup and deliveries instead of shutting doors. 

“It was a wake-up call,” Ms. Haberstroh, 27, said of the list, which reminded her how large retailers like Walmart, Costco, and Amazon had thrived during the pandemic while much smaller, local businesses had been increasingly forced to discontinue their operations. “I thought if there is one tiny thing I can do to help, then I should get on it.” 

Being as inspired as she was by this idea, Haberstroh readied herself to build a more comprehensive list; following up, she has created an Instagram post, tagging independent businesses, and shopkeepers across Toronto. Moreover, she came up with a new website by the name “Not-Amazon.ca” — a URL that she had bought for $2.99. 

Introduced as a local list to help keep small businesses alive, 'Not Amazon' was created “so you don’t have to give any money to Amazon this year!” her Instagram post read. 

“At first it started off as a bit of a joke, with the name, but soon I really wanted to make it like Amazon, having everything in one place,” she said. “I didn’t want people to have an excuse not to shop local.” 

So far, the website “Not-Amazon.com” has accumulated more than half a million page views and is witnessing the participation from 4,000 businesses across Toronto, Halifax Calgary, and Vancouver. 
Furthermore, the cause is seen to have gained worldwide acceptance as thousands of stores owner await their submission to this site along with Ms. Haberstroh’s approval. 

“In a big city like Toronto, where it feels like most businesses are local, I think it’s so easy to think these things will be here forever,” said Ms. Haberstroh, who works as a social media manager at a marketing firm and plans to expand her rebellious project 'Not Amazon' to even more cities. “You don’t think that they’re going to go anywhere.” 

 “Small businesses have always made Toronto magical. They’re what makes this city what it is. And so I think we owe it to them to keep them alive.” She added.

Canada Cybersecurity: Health Care Industry Battles Cyberattacks as Experts Call-in Federal Support


Canada's hospitals and clinics are suffering massive cyber threats as the cyberattacks targeting the Canadian healthcare industry saw a sudden rise in number.

Researchers reported that the health-care sector is the most targeted sector in Canada amounting to a total of 48% of all security breaches in the country. Digital security of hospitals in Canada is being exposed to heavy risk as the growing number of data-breach incidents imply how the healthcare industry has become the new favorite of cybercriminals.

The issue has gained widespread attention that led to calls for imposing national cybersecurity standards on the healthcare industry. In order to tackle the problem effectively and protect the privacy of their patients, the institutions are required to update their cybersecurity arsenal for which the federal government's involvement is deemed necessary by the experts.

While commenting on the matter, Paul-Émile Cloutier, the president and CEO of HealthcareCAN, said: "My biggest disappointment at this moment is that it seems that anything that has to do with the health sector and cybersecurity is falling between the cracks at the federal level."

Cybersecurity experts expressed their concern in regard and put into perspective the current inability of the Canadian health system to cope up with the increasing risk.

Experts believe that information regarding a person's health can potentially be of more value to the cybercrime space than credit card data itself for an individual's health care identity contains data with unique values that remains the same over time such as the individual's health number or DOB, it assists hackers in stealing identities by making the process smooth.

Over the past year, various Canadian health-care institutions became victim of breaches including LifeLabs, one of the country's largest medical laboratory of diagnostic testing for healthcare, which was hit by a massive cyberattack compromising the health data of around 15 million Canadians. The private provider was forced to pay a ransom in order to retrieve the stolen customer data.

In another incident, attackers breached the computer networks of three hospitals in Ontario that led to a temporary shut down of diagnostic clinics and non-emergency cases were told to come back later.

Russia has responded to Canada's accusations of cyberattacks on Georgian websites


The international community, following Georgia, the UK and the US, continues to publish statements condemning the cyberattack allegedly committed by Russia on the websites of Georgian government agencies, non-governmental organizations and the media. The relevant statements are published in Georgian by the Georgian Foreign Ministry.

Foreign Ministry of Australia, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine, and the foreign ministries of Canada, the Netherlands, Romania, and Montenegro condemned the actions of the Russian GRU. And the Icelandic Foreign Minister on his behalf published a short statement on Twitter.
The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine not only condemns Russia but also calls on the international community to "bring to justice those who deliberately organize and carry out cyberattacks".

The authors of all statements regard the report of a cyberattack on Georgian websites as a "violation by Russia of the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Georgia and disrespect for the norms and principles of international law".

However, the Russian Embassy in Canada on Twitter stated that Russia is not involved in cyberattacks on Georgian government websites.

"Another fragment of Russophobic lies and fakes," the Russian mission responded to the accusations from Canada. The diplomats called the Canadian policy towards Russia extremely deplorable and reprehensible, and stressed that it further worsens the weakened relations between the two countries.
Prior to this, the accusations of cyberattacks on Georgia were denied by the Deputy head of the

Russian Foreign Ministry, Andrey Rudenko. According to him, Russia did not intend and is not going to interfere in the internal affairs of the neighboring country.

Recall, on February 20, US Secretary of State Michael Pompeo accused Russia of attacking Georgia. They allegedly occurred in October 2019. According to him, because of this, the work of the country's government, several private websites and two major television stations was disrupted. Representatives of the Georgian government made the same statements. The cyberattack was allegedly indicated by the results of the investigation, which Tbilisi conducted "together with other partners."

New MegaCortex ransomware targeting corporate networks

A new strain of ransomware called MegaCortex has been found targeting attacks against entities in the US, Canada, France, Netherlands, Ireland, and Italy. The ransomware uses both automated as well as manual components in an effort to infect as many victims as possible. It uses a complicated chain of events with some infections beginning with stolen credentials for domain controllers inside target networks.

The ransomware was reported by UK cyber-security firm Sophos after it detected a spike in ransomware attacks at the end of last week.

According to security researchers at Sophos, the cybercriminals operating the ransomware appear to be fans of the movie Matrix, as the ransom note “reads like it was written in the voice and cadence of Lawrence Fishburne’s character, Morpheus.”

The ransomware first began popping up in January. The ransomware has a few interesting attributes, including its use of a signed executable as part of the payload, and an offer of security consulting services from the malware author. Researchers said the ransomware often is present on networks that already are infected with the Emotet and Qakbot malware, but are not sure whether those tools are part of the delivery chain for MegaCortex.

Sophos said the ransomware appears to have been designed to target large enterprise networks as part of carefully planned targeted intrusions --in a tactic that is known as "big-game hunting."

“The malware also employs the use of a long batch file to terminate running programs and kill a large number of services, many of which appear to be related to security or protection, which is becoming a common theme among current-generation ransomware families,” Sophos researcher Andrew Brandt said in a report.

Ransomware, for the most part, targets individuals rather than enterprise networks. That has mainly to do with individuals being relatively easier targets than corporate machines, but some attackers have begun to move up the food chain. Corporate ransomware infections can be much more profitable and efficient, with larger payouts for criminals who can compromise an organization rather than dozens or hundreds of individual victims. MegaCortex seems to be part of that trend, targeting enterprises with a mix of techniques.

Hacker hacking McDonald's App, ordering thousands of dollars of worth food



In Canada, McDonalds is losing out on thousands of dollars because of a notorious hacking act. The unidentified  person is hacking into McDonalds app of strangers to rack up thousands of dollars worth food purchase.

The recent victim was Patrick O’Rourke, who is  the managing editor of the tech news site MobileSyrup.He said that he didn’t realise till recently that someone has hacked into his Mcdonald's app and has ordered almost 100 meals between April 12 and April 18

According to the CBC report ,there were mass purchases of Big Macs and McFlurries. O’Rourke doubts whether a single person could have eaten all the food.

He told CBC,”It could be one guy who was able to hack my account and he shared it with a bunch of his friends across Montreal, and they all just went on a food spree,”

There have been other incidences of similar nature across Canada recently, where McDonalds app was hacked and a huge amount of bill was raised through the illegal buying of food. There have been four victims across Canadian provinces, all of them belongs to Quebec. So now Quebec Police is searching for the possible hacker in Quebec.

According to O’Rourke, McDonalds was not much to the help in the matter. He said “To me, it just seems like a little bit negligent… like they don’t really care, McDonald’s should at least be sending out a mass email to everyone that has the account [to say], ‘Hey, you should reset your password.’ ”

In Canada, McDonalds app has been hacked before.

Canadian Internet Registration Authority’s Car Parking System Struck By Ransomware!








Reportedly, CIRA’s car parking system was infected via a ransomware and was hacked into to let people park for free.


Canadian Internet Registration Authority is a gigantic internet domain which has 2.8 million, under its wings with a .ca domain.

The yet anonymous cyber-cons compromised CIRA’s car parking system, aiding people to park without getting their parking passes scanned.

Allegedly, some other company manages the car parking under CIRA.

Initially the cause which was thought to be a power failure or mechanical system crash, turned out to be a ransomware attack.



The database which was used by the car parking system for management was specifically compromised.

That very database also holds tens and tens of employee credit cards which if in wrong hands could wreak serious havoc.

After further analysis it was discovered that the ransomware in question could possibly be “Darma”.

This ransomware goes about infecting computers by way of RDP connections restricting to system that run on RDP (Remote Desktop Protocol) online.

These cyber-cons target the RDP protocol which runs on 3389. After performing a brute force attack they tried to harvest administrative credentials.


Later on an attempt at performing malicious activities on the system as made.

The silver lining happens to be that the stored card details would reclaim all the damage done by the free parking.

According to CIRA’s security survey, 37% of businesses don’t employ anti-malware protections.

CIRA also cited that they have no way whatsoever of knowing what sort of security measures are employed by the car parking in question.