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Steris Corporation, The Latest Victim of Ransomware Gang Called ‘Clop’.

 

Data related to a customer of a recently targeted California-based private cloud solutions firm Accellion is being published online for sale by threat actors. Accellion is a file-transfer platform that is used by Steris Corporation. Many other firms were targeted by hackers a few weeks ago, threat actors exploited the security loopholes in the server of the company.

Ransomware gang ‘Clop’ has taken responsibility for the attack and is claiming to have critical information in their possession belonging to Steris Corporation. Steris Corporation is an American Irish-domiciled medical equipment firm specializing in sterilization and a leading provider of surgical products for the American healthcare system. Documents that are missing from the sever system of Steris Corporation include a confidential report regarding a phenolic disinfectant comparison study dating from 2018. This report bears the signatures of two Steris employees – technical services manager David Shields and quality assurance analyst Jennifer Shultz. 

Threat actors also managed to lay their hands on another critical document containing the formula for CIP neutralizer, a highly confidential trade secret owned by Steris Corporation.

Threat analyst Brett Callow stated to Infosecurity Magazine that “Clop is known to use data stolen from one organization to attack (spear phish) others. This is why, for example, there was a cluster of cases in Germany. So, any organization that has had dealings with one of the compromised entities should be on high alert.”

“It really makes no sense for companies to pay to prevent the publication of their data. There have been multiple instances in which threat actors have published or otherwise misused information after the victims have paid the ransom. In some cases, actors have even used the same data to extort companies a second time. And this is really not at all surprising”, he further added.

Apart from Steris Corporation, the Clop ransomware gang has targeted several clients of Accellion including Jones Day, Inrix, Singtel, ExecuPharm, Plantol, Software Ag, Fugro, Nova Biomedical, Amey Plc, Allstate Peterbit, Danaher, and the CSA Group.

CLoP Hacker Group Purloined Data From Jones Day

 

A dispute has broken out over the provenance of stolen information between US law firm Jones Day and the CLoP ransomware group after some of the association's assets were leaked on the dark web. The hacker group CLoP has posted a huge tranche of stolen records to a dark web “leak site,” asserting it snatched them from the law firm during a recent cyberattack. Such sites are regularly utilized by hackers to goad a victim into paying a ransom. CLoP's site is freely accessible and was verified for its existence.

In correspondence with the Wall Street Journal, the CLoP gang professed to have acquired more than 100GB of material directly from Jones Day's servers and said it previously contacted the firm with ransom demands on 3 February 2021. Jones Day has not engaged with the gang, hence the leak. In any case, the WSJ proceeded to report that Jones Day – which is among various law firms scrutinized for its connections to previous president Trump – has denied its organization was breached and demands that the information was stolen in a supply chain attack on Accellion’s legacy file transfer product, FTA, which was publicly disclosed in January 2021. 

Accellion was first informed regarding a zero-day vulnerability in its FTA product – which is quickly moving toward end-of-life – in December 2020. It released a patch within 72 hours, but the initial incident turned out to be just the first of a series of exploits used to attack its service over the following weeks. “Our latest release of FTA has addressed all known vulnerabilities at this time,” said Accellion CISO Frank Balonis. “Future exploits, however, are a constant threat. We have encouraged all FTA customers to migrate to kiteworks for the last three years and have accelerated our FTA end-of-life plans in light of these attacks.

“Emsisoft's Brett Callow said: “If CLoP published Jones Day’s data and Jones Day says the data leaked a result of the attack on Accellion, the logical conclusion would be that CLoP was responsible for that attack – and that means they may have data relating to other Accellion customers.”

Cybercriminal Gang Clop Attacked an International Law Firm Jones Day For Ransom

 

Jones Day, a U.S.-based international law firm has suffered a major ransomware attack, and the allegedly stolen files from Jones Day were leaked on the internet. A Cybercriminal group known as Clop has taken the responsibility for attacking and stealing the files from the law firm.

The incident was first reported on February 13 by Databreaches.net and soon after the attack ransomware gang Clop claimed the responsibility and threatened the law firm to leak the files unless a ransom is paid. This group is known to encrypt files on exploited systems, as well as stealing files from the target. Former U.S. President Donald Trump is among Jones Day’s clients.

Accellion Inc., a Palo Alto-based private cloud solutions company is believed to be a source for the ransomware attack due to the vulnerability in its software, Accellion software was connected to a data breach in which 1.4 million unemployment records were stolen from the Office of the Washington State Auditor on 2nd February. Goodwin Procter, a global 50 law firm uncovered in an internal memo earlier this month that some client information has been accessed in a breach of an unnamed vendor, later discovered as Accellion.

Threat actors are claiming to have more than 100 gigabytes of data and have started to leak the stolen files online as evidence of their successful ransomware attack. This same group attacked the German tech giant Software AG in October last year and demanded a ransom of $20 million in return for a decryption key and promised not to leak the redacted files they had stolen.

Jones Day stated that “Jones Day’s network has not been breached. Nor has Jones Day been the subject of a ransomware attack. Jones Day has been informed that Accellion’s FTA file transfer platform, which is a platform that Jones Day – like many law firms, companies, and organizations – used, was recently compromised and information was taken. Jones Day continues to investigate the breach and has been, and will continue to be, in discussion with affected clients and appropriate authorities.”

Hackers Leak Tons of Personal Data as IndiaBulls Fails to Meet the First Ransomware Deadline


Hackers demanding ransom released data, as the IndiaBull failed to meet the first ransom deadline. It happened after a 24-hour ransomware warning was issued, and when the party was unable to make ends meet, the hackers dumped the data. According to Cyble, a Singapore based cybersecurity agency, the hackers have threatened to dump more data after the second deadline ends. The hackers are using ransomware, which the experts have identified as "CLOP."


The hackers stole the data from IndiaBulls and released around 5 Gb of personal data containing confidential files and customer information, banking details, and employee data. It came as a warning from the hackers, in an attempt to threaten the other party, says a private cybersecurity agency.

About the data leak-
The dumped data resulted in exposing confidential client KYC details like Adhaar card, passport details, Pan card details, and voting card details. The leak also revealed personal employee information like official ID, contact details, passwords, and codes that granted access permission to the company's online banking service. The IndiaBulls' spokesman said that the company was informed about the compromise of its systems on Monday; however, the data leaked is not sensitive. When asked about the data leak incident that happened on Wednesday, he said that the company had nothing to say.

The cybersecurity agency, however, tells a different story. It says that the spokesperson's information is incorrect as the attack did not happen on Monday. It also says that it requires some time to carry out such an attack, in other words, the transition phase from initial attack to extortion. The company may have been confused or misguided, say the cybersecurity experts. In a ransomware attack, the hacker makes it impossible for the user to access the files by encrypting them. Most of the time, the motive behind the ransomware threat is money, which is quite the opposite of state-sponsored hackers, whose aim is to affect the systems. In the IndiaBulls' incident, hackers encrypted the files using CLOP ransomware. It is yet to confirm how the hackers pulled this off, but according to Cyble, it was mainly due to vulnerabilities in the company's VPN.