Search This Blog

Showing posts with label BlueKeep. Show all posts

Windows Devices in Hospitals Vulnerable to Potential Exploits


Windows Devices in Hospitals Vulnerable to Potential Exploits According to recent reports, hackers can exploit the vulnerabilities present in health devices, and it can prove dangerous to the health of the patients at the hospital. But, the problem could be avoided by following some simple steps. The health devices have a more likable chance to the Bluekeep exploit than any other devices connected in the hospitals. Health devices can be exploited up to 2 times, using the Bluekeep exploit. This puts both the patients and the hospital staff in danger as witnessing the current scenario, the health sector has recently been one of the primary targets of the hackers.


Therefore, the issue of cybersecurity among the health sector is one of the main concerns of the digital age. Bluekeep was first discovered in 2019, and it is a vulnerability in Microsoft RDP (Remote Desktop Protocol). The vulnerability affects Windows7, Windows8, Windows Server2008, and Windows Server2008 R2. When the news of Bluekeep vulnerability surfaced, Microsoft immediately released a security patch to resolve the issue. Various intelligence agencies, including the US NSA (National Security Advisory) and Britain's NCSC (National Cyber Security Centre), immediately informed Microsoft to fix all the security patches related to the vulnerability.

The matter of concern was that Bluekeep could be used as malware to do the same damage that EternalBlue had caused, the exploit that triggered Wannacry. In this incident, various high profile organizations were taken the victim, but the greatest attack happened on the National Health Service of UK, in which the entire networks of the hospitals were shut down. But despite various warnings, health devices that run on Windows are still vulnerable to a potential Bluekeep exploit.

According to researchers at CyberMDX, a healthcare cybersecurity company, a newly made report's data suggests that more than 20% of healthcare devices (that run on Windows) in hospitals are vulnerable to the blue keep exploit, as they have still not configured to the latest security patches. The healthcare devices include x-ray machines, anesthesia machines, ultrasound devices, and radiology equipment. If these devices are not fixed to the latest security patch, chances are that hackers could exploit them using the blue keep vulnerability. This can risk the lives of the patients and the healthcare staff.

Microsoft Warns Users against BlueKeep RDP Flaw; Immediate Update Advised, Again!






Microsoft has beseeched its users all over again to get their systems updated because as it turns out hackers already have exploits of the BlueKeep RDP flaw, already.


The patch has been fabricated for the “wormable” BlueKeep Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) vulnerability; therwise the hackers could easily perform a “WannaCry” level attack.

The first warning was sent by Microsoft on May 14 when they’d released a patch for another serious Remote Code Execution vulnerability, CVE-2019-0708.

Successful exploitation of this vulnerability leads to the hacker executing an arbitrary code on the windows machine and installing programs.

 The term “Wormable” refers to the fact that any future malware exploits could contagiously spread from one system to another.

According to sources, this vulnerability is of pre-authentication type and needs no user interaction.

Any attacker who could easily exploit this vulnerability could install programs, edit, and view or delete data and even create new accounts with complete user rights.

Microsoft has a strong hunch that the cyber-cons already have fully developed plans for exploiting the aforementioned vulnerability.

More than a million PCs are susceptible to these wormable, BlueKeep RDP flaws.

A security researcher conducted RDP scan hunting for port 3389 used by Remote Desktop to find potentially and current vulnerable devices.

Major Anti-Virus brands such as Kaspersky, McAfee, Check Point and Malware Tech developed a Proof-of-Concept (PoC) that would use the CVE-2019-0708 to remotely execute the code on victim’s system.


So it happens, numerous corporate networks are under the threat and are still vulnerable more than individuals are as more systems are connected in a single network.

A single compromised system of a corporate network could put the entire organization and its systems in danger.

The compromised device could be used as a gateway and as it’s a “wormable” attack it could easily propagate across networks.

The most the users could do is keep their systems updated and their security as tight as possible as future malware could also try hacking back in.

Solutions
·      Update systems as soon as possible
·      Block Remote Desktop Services if they are not in use
·      Block TCP port 3389 at the Enterprise Perimeter Firewall
·      Apply the patch to the vulnerable systems and devices that have RDP enabled