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Hackers launch DDoS Attacks to Target Australian Banks


Hackers threatening banks in Monero to pay large amounts of money, and if the demands are not met, hackers have blackmailed to launch DDoS attacks against the banks. Since last week, bank corporations and different organizations in the financial sector in Australia have become the target of DDoS extortion campaigns.

A hackers group is blackmailing the victims to pay heavy amounts as a ransom. The attackers threaten to conduct a DDoS (Distributed Denial of Service) attack unless they are paid with XMR cryptocurrency in Monero. A security threat has been sent out by ACSC (Australian Cyber Security Centre) to inform the public about the attack. According to ACSC, none of the hackers have launched any attacks, nor has there been any news of DDoS attacks. The current evidence serves as proof of this claim.


DDoS Campaign Began in 2019 

The Global Ransom Denial of Service (DDoS), a campaign that started in October 2019, is responsible for launching the attacks on Australian financial organizations. According to ZDNet, earlier ransom efforts targeted financial companies and the banking sector. But over time, these attacks expanded and reached out to other industries. The list of nations who were the victims of the ransom threat is the banking sector in South Africa and Singapore, the telecom sector in turkey, ISP providers in South Africa and gambling websites in South Asian countries.

The ransom demands kept going on, and the attackers systematically extended the campaigns to 10 different countries across the world. Some of the attacks were successful but not all of them, as it would have been near to impossible to launch an all-out DDoS resource attack against each party. According to claims of ZDNet, it confirms that numerous attacks launched against the parties as a part of the campaign were successful.

The Group keeps changing names 

The group responsible for these attacks kept changing their identity to prevent being identified by the authorities. At first, they used Fancy Bear, the Russian hackers' group responsible for the 2014 White House Attack and 2016 DNC hack. After that, they used Cozy Bear, another Russian hacking group which is also infamous for the 2016 DNC attack.

A Trojan that Steals User's Banking Information via Fake McDonald Coupons


Spread via malvertising attacks, the banking trojan fools its victims through fake McDonald's coupons as a bait. This came into notice when banking details of Latin American buyers were tried to steal. The trojan discovered by experts at ESET is known as Mispadu, and it is similar to other trojans like Casbaneiro and Amavaldo that are found in Latin America. The trojan uses a remote crypto key for covering its original language. Mispadu targets users from Mexico and Brazil.


False McDonald’s tokens are used to lure the customers- 

The process consists of using bogus McD offer tokens as bait. These discount vouchers are either sent through spam e-mails or facebook ads which when clicked, takes the user to the primary site of the coupon. When the user clicks the button to get the coupon, they are displayed with an MSI option. The hacker uses this MSI installer to start a command that deciphers and performs an initializing course which allows them to connect to a remote server. "The trojan was also detected when working on a harmful Chrome version. It's built to shield the Google Chrome network to instead affect its victims' devices through the support of JavaScript," confirms ESET's inquiry.

Loots banking and personal information- 

Once the malware successfully invades a system, Mispadu uses false popup notifications to convince possible targets to share personal data. The primary aim of the trojan is to obtain critical system knowledge like- commonly used Latin American banking apps menu and downloaded safety products. The trojan also steals information from several network browsers and e-mail consumers. This includes Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Outlook, Internet Explorer, and many more.

"Mispadu can also steal crypto funds like Bitcoins using a technique like a clipboard hijacking. But fortunately, no such case has appeared to date," says ESET. The elements of the Google Chrome expansion that the trojan uses for sharing can also collect users' transaction information and debit card data through various sites by scouring the information from data application lists. "For securing a backdoor entry in your device, Mispadu can automatically capture a screenshot, regulate your keyboard and mouse controls, and recover commands," say the experts.

Banking customers are tricked by SCA checks

Online scammers are using changes to European banking rules around customer authentication to trick consumers into handing over their sensitive financial details, according to Which?

The consumer rights group warned that attackers are spoofing the emails being sent from banks, payment firms and e-commerce providers asking for up-to-date info, as part of new Strong Customer Authentication (SCA) requirements.

Firms across the EU are gearing up for the changes, part of PSD2, which will require a form of two-factor authentication on any online transactions over €30, although some exceptions apply.

Ironically, payments providers and e-commerce firms in the UK have been given a further 18 months to comply with the new rules, originally set for a September 14 deadline.

Yet that hasn’t stopped the scammers: Which? claimed it has already spotted phishing emails imitating emails from Santander, Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS) and HSBC.

Urging the recipient to update their banking information ahead of “new procedures,” they include links designed to take the victim to a legitimate-looking page designed to harvest banking details.

Which? argued that in many cases, legitimate brands are making it harder for consumers to spot phishing emails, by including links in their own emails, and by using multiple unusual domains for various landing pages.

The group claimed that 78% of its members think banks and other financial firms should never include links in emails, to make phishing attempts easier to spot.

Tripwire VP, Tim Erlin, agreed, arguing that companies can’t simultaneously tell customers not to follow links in emails but then continue to send them emails urging them to click through.

“As long as banks send legitimate emails as a means of communicating with customers, scammers will attempt the same with fake emails,” he added.

“Email as implemented today is a terrible system for conducting business. While attempts have been made to improve the technology, none of them have taken hold.”

Chinese Banking Has A New Edge; Jack Ma Behind The Latest Developments!




Jack Ma is associated with one of the leading economies of the world.The risk management system employed by Jack Ma’s banking endeavors analyses over 3,000.

Per sources his company has lent around $290 billion to over 15 million small companies where the borrowing party could receive the cash almost immediately, with just a few taps.

The entire process requires no human forces and gets completed in around 3 minutes with a default rate of around 1%.

Earlier the small borrowers were rejected but thanks to MYbank and its associates the new form of payments is coming in real handy.

With the slow pace of China’s economy it gets imperative to keep a check on the risks and defaults.
Around two-third of the country’s small businesses couldn’t access loans, according to National Institution for Finance & Development.

But thanks to Jack Ma’s initiatives the lending and borrowing procedures of China are now seeing monumental growth.

Mybank’s lending app has created a real difference. By allowing the bank to access the store transaction data, some small loans have been covered.