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RBI AnyDesk Warning; here's how Scammers Use it to Steal Money



In February, Reserve Bank of India (RBI) issued warning regarding a remote desktop app known as 'AnyDesk', which was employed by scammers to carry out unauthorized transactions from bank accounts of the customers via mobile or laptop.

In the wake of RBI's warning, various other banks such as HDFC Bank, ICICI Bank and Axis Bank along with a few others, also issued an advisory to make their customers aware about AnyDesk's fraudulent potential and how it can be used by the hackers to steal money via Unified Payments Interface (UPI).

However, it is important to notice that Anydesk app is not infectious, in fact, on the contrary, it is a screen-sharing platform of extreme value to the IT professionals which allows users to connect to various systems and mobiles remotely over the internet.

How the Scam Takes Places? 

When a customer needs some help from the customer care, he gets in touch via a call and if he gets on line with a scammer, he would ask him to download AnyDesk app or a similar app known as TeamViewer QuickSupport on his smartphone.

Then, he would ask for a remote desk code of 9-digit which he requires to view the customer's screen live on his computer. He can also record everything that is been shown on the screen. Subsequently, whenever the victim enters the ID and password of his UPI app, the scammer records it.

Users are advised not to download AnyDesk or any other remote desktop applications without fully understanding their functioning.

You should also be highly skeptical of the additional apps that customer support executives may ask you to download as besides fraudsters, no one asks for codes, passwords or any other sensitive information.

Fraudsters claiming to be from Bank and offers to assist you via TeamViewer


In Russia, a new way of telephone fraud is gaining momentum. Attackers disguised as a bank employee calls to Bank’s client to suspend a financial transaction but do not require to tell confidential data of Bank cards. They claim that the credit institution identified an attempt to the unauthorized withdrawal of funds from an account in another region.

As a result, the scammers report that they blocked the attempt to withdraw money, and offer to verify the devices that have access to the personal account of the client. Then attackers will find out if the client uses the Android or IOS operating system. Subsequently, the attackers offer to help disable the system, which is not used by the client, using the TeamViewer access delegation program.

The TeamViewer access delegation program allows an outsider to connect and perform any operation on your behalf. Fraudsters need to find out from the Bank's client their user id so that attackers can easily connect and take possession of confidential smartphone information. In this case, it will be extremely difficult, if not impossible to prove an attempt at unauthorized hacking. After all, the Bank's client voluntarily provided access.

It is worth noting that previously a number of large credit organizations recorded a sharp increase in fraudulent calls to customers from banks using the technology of number substitution. In some banks, the activity of fraudsters has increased tenfold.

The banks indicate that telecom operators are not effectively detecting and blocking such schemes. The solution to the problem came to the level of the Central Bank.

It is interesting to note that on August 10, the Central Bank of Russia recommended banks to inform payment systems of the number of the Bank card, account or mobile phone of the recipient. This should help identify fraudsters and block transactions. The requirements relate to P2P transfers and transfers, where a third Bank is involved, as well as payment systems.

If banks and payment systems follow the Central Bank's recommendations, data on the recipient of funds will be sent to the FinCERT (center for monitoring and responding to computer attacks in the financial sphere of the General Directorate of protection and information security at the Bank of Russia).

According to the leading anti-virus expert of Kaspersky Lab Sergey Golovanov, indicating the phone number will track cases when one person has issued many accounts for his number and uses them to transfer funds using social engineering.

HDFC Bank Issues Warning Against a New Online Scam: Here's What you Should Know!



HDFC Bank has sent out a warning to its online banking users about a scam carried out by an app known as AnyDesk which is used by hackers for stealing money through unified payments interface (UPI). The main objective of the scam is to acquire unauthorized access to a victim’s mobile and carry out illegal transactions without any knowledge of the account holder.

In February, Reserve Bank of India (RBI), said, ‘AnyDesk’ have the ability to acquire complete access to users mobile devices which is exploited by hackers to steal their money via making transactions remotely. AnyDesk is a remote device control app which allows the remote controlling of devices.

Bewaring the customers, the bank has issued an official mailer concerning the matter and further warned its users that hackers attempt to access their account related confidential information such as OTP, PIN, expiry date, debit card details, and other sensitive data which is required for the purpose of authentication during transactions.

To ensure the safety of its users, HDFC Bank advised them against sharing their confidential data with anonymous callers and in order to keep their bank balance fortified, they should avoid downloading any apps onto their smartphones.

Commenting on the matter, the bank said, "Beware! Fraudsters may ask you to download AnyDesk App and share a 9-digit code which gets them access to your phone to steal money. Do not share your card details / OTP / PIN with anyone and report any unusual activity immediately to the bank.”


3 million dollar was stolen from Investment company through email hacking scam




According to authorities, Two con artists from New Jersey and their team hacked into several corporate accounts stealing almost $3 million which was meant for a Manhattan real state transaction on Thursday.

The fraud took place after two foreigners gained access to the corporate email account of the investment company, they were keeping eye on potential investment deals through the emails. The name of the investment firm has not been revealed.

Before a deal of $2.8 million dollar was done, the foreigners emailed the investment company fraudulent account details that appeared to be coming from intended recipient. According to the prosecutors, the two foreigners who planned and stole the money from investment company are known by the name  Estarlin Reynoso and  Lucy Beswick

According to the court papers, Beswick, 27 instructed  Reynoso, 29, step by step on how to open a business account and how to wire the stolen funds through the whatsapp messaging service.

Manhattan DA Cyrus Vance said “New Yorkers whose jobs include wiring money should pay attention to this case, Business email compromises cause billions in worldwide losses each year, but there are steps that companies large and small can take to avoid becoming a victim.”

Vance has suggested businesses to be careful of the authenticity of the emails. They should be verified through verbal communication if transfer of funds are involved.He also suggested to use anti-phishing tools to authenticate emails.

According to the Prosecutor, Reynoso transferred funds to three different banks in China before the fraud was detected. Both the accused were charged with Larceny,identity theft and criminal possession of stolen funds.
The investment company was able to recover most of the funds. Beswick was freed without bail while Reynoso was released on bail for $10000.

Cybercriminals Preferring Audio Skimmers Over Flash Skimmers






There has been a rapid increase in the number of web skimming attacks since the advancements in the technological sector; it also resulted in excessive activity in the black market of physical card skimming tools.
Web skimming attacks are designed to capture critical financial data and card details like the name of the holder and sensitive numbers. It is when attackers connect their spying tool to a point-of-sale system (PoS) or an ATM in order to get access to the data that is processed from credit/debit cards via these machines.
The ever evolving ways of web skimming are one of the reasons why it is thriving and remains undetected,  professionals skimmers have formed closed communities which are organized to coordinate during skimming processes and assist the cashers, decoders, engineers, extractors, and vendors with whatever they need.
Advanced Intelligence, a New York based fraud prevention company reported that the usual targets are gas stations, ATMs or PoS terminals. Skimming includes unauthorized access to sensitive financial information for which the cybercriminals mainly rely on upgrades and advancements in technology to produce and circulate products which are unassailable and undetectable.
Another variant includes Audio Skimmers, which have been known to exist since 2010 and the technique employed in Audio Skimming is said to be existing since 1992. The devices involved store the data and encrypt it to capture it in MP3 format. The threat rate of Audio Skimmers multiplies with the camera attached to capture the PIN number and acting as a video skimmer.
Commenting on the matter, Yelisey Boguslaskiy, director of security research at AdvIntel, said, "They use timing-calculating algorithms to “reed” the audio when the card is been scanned by the ATM, which allows them to decode a track in 1-2 seconds and immediately convert it into text format,"
"Russian-speaking real carding communities have traditionally been exclusive and tight-lipped regarding their skimming operations. Skimming developers form exclusive trusted underground criminal networks thereby connecting talented engineers, their trusted sellers, and wealthy carder buyers of such tools,” further added.






Can Aadhaar card data be misused to open bank accounts?

Can your Aadhaar Card data be misused by fraudsters to open bank accounts? Don’t worry! Aadhaar Card holders often ask what will happen if some fraudster tries to open a bank account against their names without their knowledge by obtaining a copy of their Aadhaar. People have raised apprehensions about whether they would be harmed or not. The Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI), the nodal authority for issuing Aadhaar, claims that Aadhaar Card data is completely safe and secured.

UIDAI has clearly stated that one can not open a bank account merely by presenting or submitting a physical Aadhaar Card or its photocopy. As per Prevention of Money-laundering (Maintenance of Records) Rules, 2005, and Reserve Bank of Indian circulars, a bank will go through a certain process of security checking. The process involves banks to perform verification through either biometric data or OTP authentication. Apart from this, there are another due diligence that need to be done by the bank before the Aadhaar Card can be accepted for banking transactions or KYC, says UIDAI. So as per the rules, no fraudster can open a bank account against your name using your Aadhaar Card details without verification through biometric or OTP.

However, if someone manages to open an account in a bank using your Aadhaar Card details without biometric or OTP authentication and other verification, then the bank will be held responsible for the loss, says UIDAI.

If you are still not sure about the security of your Aadhaar Card, then UIDAI provides another option for the verifiable 12-digit identification number. The Masked Aadhaar card is a viable option if you want to secure your Aadhaar Card details. While downloading Aadhaar Card details, you can opt for a more safer option of Masked Aadhaar card. This Masked Aadhaar Card only shows the last 4 digits of the 12-digit Aadhaar number. So, instead of carrying a phyiscal copy of your Aadhaar Card or a photocopy, it is advisable to have a Masked Aadhaar card, which in case of being misplaced or stolen is less likely to be misused. However, the Masked Aadhaar card does display other key details such as photograph, smart QR Code and demographic info.

Fraudsters Gaining Access to Users Mobile Devices to Commit Bank Fraud


With the advent of Unified Payment Services (UPI), the idea of sending money from one bank account to the other without having to top up the sum in the mobile wallet has become a reality. However, with new means of transactions coming up and widening of the horizon of banking operations, there is an even enhanced possibility of bank frauds. Hackers have been continuously coming up with new ways of bypassing security.
ICICI Bank reported that in order to gain remote access of smartphones of various users, cybercriminals trick users into downloading ‘AnyDesk’, an application available on App Store as well as Play Store.
Once the user downloads the app, a nine-digit app code is generated on his mobile device which they are then asked to share with the criminals. After receiving the code, fraudster enters the code onto his mobile and then asks the user to grant him certain permissions. Now, once the criminal gets the permissions, he can access the user’s device with ease.
Users are advised to verify and then install the original UPI app and payment wallets from Apple Store and Google Play Store owned by authenticated companies. Avoid downloading applications from suspicious or unknown sources and consider reading reviews prior to going for the download.
Furthermore, while granting permissions on making the download, one should be highly alert and pay extra attention to the details. Banks suggest having your e-mail ID registered and verified in order to be notified of any illegal action taken on your account.
Other safety tips include getting your SIM card blocked instantly if you happen to misplace your mobile device and logging out of your bank account from the web browser. Lastly, customers should always keep a track of their banking transactions which are sent through SMS, it will allow them to take note of any fraudulent transaction and report it to the bank.