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Tim Cook Claims Android has 47 Times the Amount of Malware as iOS

 

During a live chat, Apple CEO Tim Cook stated that Android has more malware than iOS and that "sideloading" mobile software is not in the "best interests of users." Sideloading apps entails manually downloading and installing software over the Internet rather than from an app store. Apple's security and privacy would be ruined if it were compelled to enable side-loading programmes, as Android does, he stated on June 16 while speaking remotely at the VivaTech 2021 conference in Paris, France. 

When asked about the planned European law known as the Digital Markets Act (DMA), which attempts to prohibit big digital corporations from monopolizing their market position, Cook stated that Apple opposes it because it would require the company to allow consumers to install apps outside of the App Store. Cook also stated that Android has "47 times more malware" than Apple since iOS is created with a single app store. 

Explaining the reason, Cook added, "It's because we've designed iOS in such a way that there's one app store and all of the apps are reviewed prior to going on the store. And so that keeps a lot of this malware stuff out of our ecosystem, and customers have told us very continuously how much they value that, and so we're going to be standing up for the user in the discussions." 

Cook further claimed that the DMA's present language, which will compel side-loading on the iPhone, will "destroy the security" of the smartphone and many of the App Store's privacy measures. 

DMA targets firms with a huge user base, such as Apple, Google, and Amazon, and encourages them to open up their platforms to competitors. The proposed rule also intends to provide a more level playing field for businesses and individuals who rely on large "gatekeeper" online platforms to sell their goods and services in a single market. 

“We've been focusing on privacy for over a decade,” Cook stated when asked about Apple's commitment to privacy. “We see it as a basic human right. A fundamental human right. And we've been focused on privacy for decades. Steve used to say privacy was stating in plain language what people are signing up for and getting their permission. And that permission should be asked repeatedly. We've always tried to live up to that.”

Is Apple's Monopoly Making Its Security Vulnerable?


It's a well-known fact that Apple’s devices are undoubtedly way safer than any other company’s products, however, in recent research analysis, many reports claimed it to be a myth. 

According to the experts, Apple’s complex process of downloading apps has created a notion of added security but seemingly such is not the case, as revealed in deeper examinations. 

Reportedly, around 2% of the top-grossing iOS apps, are in some way, scams. Customers of several VPN apps, which protect users’ data, have complained against Apple App Store – saying that their devices are contaminated by a virus that tricks them to download and pay for software that they don’t need. 

An illegal QR code reader app that remains for a week on the store tricks users into paying $4.99. Moreover, some apps even mock themselves as being from big global organizations such as Amazon and Samsung. 

Apple always maintained its exclusive command on the App Store and describes this as its policy which is essential for customer’s sensitive personal credentials. Apple has a monopoly in the App market in terms of customer trust. However, some analysts said that this is indeed the biggest problem that there is no competition against this giant in the market, if some companies will come with alternatives then– as a matter of fact – Apple will invest more money in strengthening their security measures. 

“If consumers were to have access to alternative app stores or other methods of distributing software, Apple would be a lot more likely to take this problem more seriously,” said Stan Miles, an economics professor at Thompson Rivers University in British Columbia, Canada. 

As per the statistics, that Apple generates huge profit from the App store; around 30 percent of its revenue is constituted by the App store. 

Apple spokesperson Fred Sainz said in a statement that, “We hold developers to high standards to keep the App Store a safe and trusted place for customers to download software, and we will always take action against apps that pose a harm to users…” 

“…Apple leads the industry with practices that put the safety of our customers first, and we’ll continue learning, evolving our practices, and investing the necessary resources to make sure customers are presented with the very best experience.”

A Bug in iPhone Call Recording App Exposed Clients Data

 

A security vulnerability in a famous iPhone call recording application exposed thousands of users' recorded conversations. The flaw was found by Anand Prakash, a security researcher and founder of PingSafe AI, who tracked down that the aptly named Automatic Call Recorder application permitted anybody to access the call recordings from different clients — by knowing their phone number. 
 This application can track and record calls without an internet connection and can alter the voices of recordings, upload them to Dropbox, Google Drive, or One Drive, and also can translate in up to 50 dialects. All the client information gets stored in the company’s cloud storage on Amazon web services. This cloud storage has somewhere around 130,000 audio recordings that make up almost 300 GB. 

 Security circumstances like this are disastrous. Alongside affecting client's security, these issues likewise debilitate the organization's image and give an additional benefit to the contenders, said Anand Prakash. “This wasn’t just a violation of data privacy but also affected the users physically and at cyber risk, if their recorded conversations carry sensitive personal information. App makers that go wrong in investing in their cybersecurity must accept that the fines they could face for non-compliance with data privacy laws are extremely expensive – not to mention the cost of losing their customers' trust” he added. 

The bug was detected by Anand Prakash on the 27th of the last month when he was able to modify the web traffic and supplant the enlisted telephone number with someone else's number utilizing a proxy site called Burp, which gave him admittance to that person's call records and details. Fortunately, the bug was fixed by Saturday, March 6th, and the glitch-free version was launched in the Apple App Store. 

The call recorder clients were advised to uninstall the previous variant and download the latest rendition that is 2.26 or newer which is accessible on the Apple App Store. The paid variant is $6.99 for 7 days; additionally, they allow a three-day trial period. Their most basic monthly membership costs $14.99, with a 12 months advance, and has a few other options as well.

17 Trojan infested apps you need to delete from your iPhone right now!


Just like the ancient Greek story, where soldiers sneak into the gates of troy by hiding inside a wooden horse similarly Trojans sneak in your phone in the face of harmless apps that you voluntarily install. Apple users are being warned about such apps, to check their devices against a list of malware apps and delete them according to a report by Wandera.

Research team at Wandera, a software-as-a-service firm, has identified 17 apps that install malicious Trojan module on iOS devices. Apple says that the infected apps have been removed from the app store but after examination they found that the apps did not contain the claimed Trojan malware. Instead, the apps were removed because of being adware specifically called the "clicker Trojan malware" and included code that enabled artificial click-through of add and made it seem like you viewed an advertisement which is against App Store's guidelines. Apple further said that the protective tools of App Store have been updated to detect such apps.

 Below is the list of infected apps:

RTO Vehicle Information
EMI Calculator & Loan Planner
File Manager - Documents
Smart GPS Speedometer
CrickOne - Live Cricket Scores
Daily Fitness - Yoga Poses
FM Radio PRO - Internet Radio
My Train Info - IRCTC & PNR​ (not listed under developer profile)
Around Me Place Finder
Easy Contacts Backup Manager
Ramadan Times 2019
Pro Restaurant Finder - Find Food
BMI Calculator PRO - BMR Calc
Dual Accounts Pro
Video Editor - Mute Video
Islamic World PRO - Qibla
Smart Video Compressor

The developer of these is AppAspect Technologies, from India with apps for iOS as well as Android. Wandera said that on examining these apps, they didn't contain the clicker Trojan malware but they used too. Covington thinks it's a possibility that they used to contain Trojan but were pulled from the store, and republished after removing the Trojan module, perhaps the bust on Play store made them retreat and focus their attention on iOS.

According to Wandera, the Trojan not only performed adware but also steal information and data to send to external command or controller, create back-doors, performance degradation, battery drain and heavy bandwidth use. The fact that they published on App Store and remained undetected is alone a matter of concern. “We were amazed with this one,” Wandera VP Michael Covington said in a statement to Forbes. “We've seen a couple of issues creep into the Apple App Store over the last few months—and it always seems to be the network element.”

Apple stands it's ground that any such Trojan malware existed, saying there was no danger beyond ad click-through fraud. But the good news is, the problem is solved on deleting the apps and no remains are left behind. “There is no access to special frameworks that might have left something behind,” Covington explained.

iPhone contacts app vulnerable to hack attack, says security firm


Apple has never shied away from boasting about how secure its systems are, but researchers have found that contacts saved on iPhones are vulnerable to an SQLite hack attack which could infect the devices with malware.

SQLite - the most widespread database engine in the world - is available in every operating system (OS), desktop and mobile phone. Windows 10, macOS, iOS, Chrome, Safari, Firefox and Android are popular users of SQLite.

Security firm Check Point has demonstrated a technique being used to manipulate Apple's iOS Contacts app. Searching the Contacts app under these circumstances triggers the device to run malicious codes, Apple Insider reported on Saturday.

The vulnerability has been identified in the industry-standard SQLite database.

Documented in a 4,000-word report, the company's hack involved replacing one part of Apple's Contacts app and while apps and any executable code has to go through Apple's startup checks, an SQLite database is not executable.

"Persistence (keeping the code on the device after a restart) is hard to achieve on iOS as all executable files must be signed as part of Apple's Secure Boot. Luckily for us, SQLite databases are not signed," the report quoted the Check Point researchers as saying.

As of now, Apple has not commented on Check Point's report.

Apps Generating Untraceable International Phone Numbers ?






Applications that generate international phone numbers that are super difficult to track are being employed by cyber criminals to rip people off.

A recent victim that had called the cyber-crime branch complained that they received a call from two spate numbers one with 001 and the other with 0063 as the country codes.

Per sources the app stores happen to contain 40 to 60 such apps through which cyber-cons could easily get these numbers.

Sources mentioned that allegedly “Dingtone” is an app via which a user can easily sift through a variety of country codes which are absolutely untraceable.

These cases according to the cyber-crime branch aren’t categorized separately but these are surely being registered and deliberated upon.



According to the cyber-security researchers a minimum of 500 cases come into existence per day in India alone with 40 cases pinning on major cities.

The police lack the technological efficiency as well as resources to possibly track the users of such applications. There is also a matter of jurisdiction.

Mostly, the above-mentioned apps are ‘not’ developed by Indian initiators but ironically originated from countries that have strict laws on removal of apps.

Information of the caller could seemingly be obtained by requesting the telecom service providers as such services are always linked together.

However, requesting the details of the callers from a telecom service provider abroad is extremely time-consuming. Besides, the CBI would require Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty with that very country.

As of now, such treaties exist with only 39 countries. In addition some countries could also demand a court order and furthermore the procedure in itself takes six to eighteen months.