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HACKED- Windows 10, macOS, Adobe, VMware, Apple and Oracle at The Pwn2Own 2020!


Pwn2Own is a well-known computer hacking contest which is held once every year at the CanSecWest security conference. In this contest, the contestants are tested on how well they could exploit commonly used software and mobile devices with formerly unheard of vulnerabilities.

An issue as grave as the Coronavirus pandemic has clearly not affected the spirits of the Pwn2Own 2020 hacking competition which got done with its first two days.

On Day 1, security researchers and participants bagged a handsome amount of over $180,000 for exploiting the Windows 10, Ubuntu Desktop and macOS, mention sources.

Reportedly, a “team from the Georgia Tech Systems Software and Security Lab succeeded in exploiting a kernel privilege escalation to execute code on macOS” by way of Safari. The attack mechanism that ended up winning for the team $70,000 was comprised of 6 vulnerabilities.

Per the event page (thezdi.com), Georgia Tech employed a “6 bug chain to pop calc and escalate to root”.

The team that has won several preceding editions of the hacking contest, Team Fluoroacetate, won themselves a victorious $40,000 after they employed a “local privilege escalation exploit” meant for the Windows 10.

Reports mention that one of the two members of the aforementioned team also won himself a smashing amount of $40,000 for yet another privilege escalation exploit pursuing Windows 10.

As per sources, the RedRocket CTF team got themselves a win, owing to it to one of their members, Mafred Paul, who bagged an attractive amount of $30,000 for a local privilege escalation exploit focused on Ubuntu Desktop. The hack was about the manipulation of the ‘Input validation bug’.

On Day 2, The Fluoroacetate successfully targeted the Adobe Reader with a local privilege escalation by employing a pair of UAFs, mentioned sources and grabbed an amount of $50,000.

Per reports, the Synacktiv team targeted the VMware Workstation but unfortunately to no avail in the given duration of time. There also were special demonstrations of the Zero Day Initiative against the Oracle VirtualBox.

This was the very first time the organizers allowed “conditional remote participation” in the Pwn2Own hacking contest, understandably because of the increased concerns of people about traveling due to the Coronavirus outbreak.



One of Today's Most Popular E-Commerce Platforms Hit By A Major Security Breach


Recently Magento Marketplace, a portal for purchasing, selling, and downloading plug-ins and themes for Magento-based online stores was hit by a major security breach revealed by Adobe, as Adobe acquired Magento for $1.68 billion in May 2018.

The impacted users incorporate both the regular ones who purchased themes and plugins as well as the theme developers who were utilizing the portal to sell their code and make money.

In an email sent to users, the company said it was the vulnerability in the Magento Marketplace website that permitted "an unauthorized third-party" to access the account data for the registered users. The vulnerability enabled access to user information, like name, email, store username (MageID), billing and shopping addresses, phone number, and limited commercial information like percentages for payments Adobe made to theme/plugin developers.

However, fortunately, any account's passwords or financial information were not exposed, according to Adobe.

Jason Woosley, Vice President of Commerce Product and Platform, Experience Business, at Adobe, says “We have notified impacted Magento Marketplace account holders directly and already took down the Magento as soon as we learned of the hack in order to address the vulnerability.”

The store is currently back online.

The Adobe VP although didn't share the exact number of affected accounts. A Magento representative when approached didn't comment past the company's official blog post.

Nonetheless Adobe executive said the hack didn't bring about any outages or disturbances to the company's core Magento products and services, and, at the hour of writing, there is no reason to accept that the hacker compromised Magento's core backend or plugins and themes facilitated on the 'marketplace'.