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Major Security Flaw Spotted in 5G Core Network Slicing Design

 

AdaptiveMobile security researchers have discovered a major flaw in the architecture of 5G network slicing and virtualized network functions. This vulnerability has been discovered to potentially allow data access and denial of service (DOS) attacks between different network slices on a mobile operator which leaves enterprise clients exposed to malicious cyberattacks. 

Details of 5G network

5G, the 5th generation mobile network, is the latest global wireless standard after the previously introduced 1G, 2G, 3G, and 4G networks which makes it all the more important because it enables a new kind of network that is created to connect virtually everyone and everything including machines, objects and devices.

How does 5G network slicing works?

Network slicing basically permits a mobile operator to divide their core and radio network into multiple distinct virtual blocks that provide different amount of resources to different types of traffics.

A great benefit of 5G network slicing for network operators will be the ability to deploy only the functions necessary to support specific clients and particular market segments such as automotive, healthcare, critical infrastructure, and entertainment. 

Some of the top nations using 5G are also the ones who are most affected by the vulnerability including South Korea, United Kingdom, Germany, and the United States because multiple firms in these countries deployed networks and are selling compatible devices.

5G network loopholes 

In its investigation, AdaptiveMobile Security examined 5G core networks that contain both shared and dedicated network functions, disclosing that when a network has these ‘hybrid’ network functions that support several slices there is a lack of mapping between the application and transport layers identities.

This vulnerability in the industry standards has the potential impact of creating an opportunity for an attacker to access data and launch denial-of-service attacks across multiple slices if they have access to the 5G service-based architecture. 

“When it comes to securing 5G, the telecoms industry needs to embrace a holistic and collaborative approach to secure networks across standards bodies, working groups, operators and vendors. Currently, the impact on real-world applications of this network-slicing is only limited by the networks globally. The risks, if the fundamental flaw in the design of 5G standards had gone undiscovered, are significant,” said Dr. Silke Holtmanns, Head of 5G Security Research at AdaptiveMobile Security.

India And Japan Agree on The Need for Robust and Resilient Digital and Cyber Systems

 

India and Japan finalize a cybersecurity deal as both agreed to the need for vigorous and 'resilient digital and cyber systems'. 

Their ambitious agreement accommodates participation in 5G technology, AI and a variety of other critical regions as the two strategic partners pledged to broad base their ties including in the Indo-Pacific area. 

The foreign ministers of the two nations – S Jaishankar of India and Motegi Toshimitsu of Japan – were of the view that a free, open, and comprehensive Indo-Pacific region “must be premised on diversified and resilient supply chains."

The two ministers “welcomed the Supply Chain Resilience Initiative between India, Japan, Australia, and other like-minded countries." 

Their initiative comes with regards to nations hoping to enhance supply chains out of China subsequent to Beijing suddenly closing factories and units in the repercussions of the Coronavirus pandemic, sending economic activities into a dump. 

The move hurled the subject of dependability of supply chains situated in China with nations hoping to widen the hotspots for critical procurement. In September, the trade ministers of India, Australia, and Japan had consented upon to dispatch an initiative on supply chain resilience.


Jaishankar, in a tweet, said further expansion of India-Japan cooperation in third nations centering around development projects likewise figured in the thirteenth India-Japan foreign minister's strategic dialogue.

The two “welcomed the finalization of the text of the cybersecurity agreement. The agreement promotes cooperation in capacity building, research, and development, security and resilience in the areas of Critical Information Infrastructure, 5G, Internet of Things (IoT), Artificial Intelligence (AI), among others," the statement said. 

In New Delhi, the agreement was cleared at a Cabinet meeting headed by PM Narendra Modi, as per Information and Broadcasting Minister Prakash Javadekar. 

The ministers concurred that the following annual bilateral summit between the leaders of India and Japan would be facilitated by the Indian government “at a mutually convenient time for the two Prime Ministers."

Samsung and SK Telecom Unveil World's First Quantum Security Tech 5G Smartphone


The two companies have recently revealed the world's first QRNG (Quantum Random Number Generator) 5G smartphone. The smartphone is named Galaxy A Quantum (a newer version of the A71 5G) and gives some excellent smartphone features, but QRNG technology makes it different from the rest, as it makes the apps and services prone to hacks. The Normal Random Generated Numbers are used in multiplatform logins like payment platforms and 2 step authentication, which is easy for hackers to infiltrate.


The QRNG technology, with the world's smallest chipset of dimensions 2.5mm by 2.5mm, on the other hand, uses CMOS image sensors and LED. The LED and CMOS sensors are responsible for emitting image noise and capturing the light, respectively, to create a random number of strings with unpredictable patterns. No technology in the industry is capable of hacking the Galaxy A Quantum, one of the most secure smartphones, says SK Telecom. However, it should be noted that the chip SKT IDQ S2Q000 is only for use with SK services. But, the tighter the challenge, the better the hackers. The Galaxy A Quantum has a 6.7-inch super AMOLED Infinity-O display, an in-display fingerprint reader, and a full HD resolution.

A 64-megapixel main camera, 12-megapixel ultrawide-angle camera, 5-megapixel macro camera, and a 5-megapixel depth sensor, together form the rear quad camera setup. The front camera comes with 32 megapixels. "This is the company's first phone with a dynamic OLED panel -- technology that Samsung's marketing department is referring to as "Infinity O AMOLED." We're looking at an HDR10+ screen that uses "dynamic tone mapping" to improve the contrast, keep details visible even in dark spots and optimize colors when you're saying, watching a movie. Unrelated to that, the screen also reduces blue light by 42 percent to minimize eye strain. That's not a special night mode, mind you, but the default experience," Engadget in its review.

It is not the first time that the two companies have worked together, in September 2019, the companies were working on first 8K TV with 5G connectivity. We hope that this won't be the last.