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Gamer Alert: More than 10 Billion Attacks On Gaming Industry In 2 Years

According to cybersecurity firm Akamai's recent report titled "State of the Internet/Security," the gaming sector has suff...

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179 Dark Net Vendors Arrested in a Massive International Sting; 500 kg Drugs Seized


Global police agencies have confiscated over $6.5m both in cash and virtual currencies, 64 firearms, and 1,100 pounds of drugs - arresting 179 vendors across 6 countries including the U.S and Europe in one of the biggest raid on dark web marketplaces. The international sting operation saw considerable co-operation from Law enforcement agencies all over the world including the US, UK, Germany, Europe, Canada, Europe, Sweden, Austria, and the Netherlands.

The 500kg of drugs recovered by investigators during the operation included fentanyl, methamphetamine, oxycodone, ecstasy, cocaine, hydrocodone, MDMA, and several other medicines containing addictive substances, as per the findings.

The authorities dubbed the global sting operation as 'DisrupTor' and while announcing it, they claimed in a press release that the "golden age of the dark web marketplace is over." The roots of the operation go back to May 3, 2019; the day German authorities seized the dark web drug market, "Wallstreet market" and arrested its operators.

"Operations such as these highlight the capability of law enforcement to counter encryption and anonymity of dark web market places. Police no longer only take down such illegal marketplaces – they also chase down the criminals buying and selling illegal goods through such sites." The press release further read.

According to the Justice Department, it was the largest international law enforcement operation that targeted opioid traffickers on the dark web. The investigation witnessed an extensive range of investigators ranging from the FBI, ICE, DEA, Customs and Border Protection (CBP), to the Defense Department.

Commenting on the success of the operation, the head of Europol’s European Cybercrime Centre (EC3), Edvardas Šileris said, “Law enforcement is most effective when working together, and today’s announcement sends a strong message to criminals selling or buying illicit goods on the dark web: the hidden internet is no longer hidden, and your anonymous activity is not anonymous. Law enforcement is committed to tracking down criminals, no matter where they operate – be it on the streets or behind a computer screen.”

“With the spike in opioid-related overdose deaths during the Covid-19 pandemic, we recognize that today’s announcement is important and timely,” said Christopher Wray, FBI director. “The FBI wants to assure the American public, and the world, that we are committed to identifying dark net drug dealers and bringing them to justice.” He further added.

Russian-speaking hackers attacked Russian companies and demanded ransom

Group-IB recorded a successful attack by the criminal group OldGremlin on a Russian medical company. The attackers completely encrypted its corporate network and demanded a ransom of $50,000.

Russian-speaking hackers from the OldGremlin group attacked several Russian companies, despite the ban: among cybercriminals, there is an unspoken rule "do not work on RU".

According to experts, since the spring of 2020, hackers from OldGremlin have conducted at least nine attacks on Russian companies. It is noted that they send malicious emails allegedly on behalf of the Russian media holding RBC, the Russian metallurgical holding, the Minsk Tractor Plant, the Union of microfinance organizations and other individuals and enterprises. Under various pretexts, attackers are asked to click on the link and download the file. After trying to open it on the victim's computer, the backdoor malware TinyPosh runs.

This time a large Russian medical company became the victim of the criminals. After gaining access to the computer of one of the employees, they deleted the organization's backups, and also spread the TinyCrypton ransomware virus on the computers of the employees. As a result of their actions, the work of regional branches of the medical company was stopped. Then the hackers demanded a ransom: they wanted to get 50 thousand dollars in cryptocurrency for restoring access.

"The lack of a strong communication channel between organizations that resist cybercrime, as well as the difficult political situation, lead to the emergence of new criminal groups that feel safe," said Rustam Mirkasymov, head of the dynamic analysis of malicious code at Group-IB. The expert also stressed that businesses often underestimate the threats posed by cybercriminals, and do not use the necessary means of protection. 

A major Ukrainian IT company has revealed details of the hacker attack

Ukrainian IT company SoftServe has issued an official statement about the recent hacker attack, in which it gave details of the incident and said that its investigation is still ongoing.

As a reminder, in early September SoftServe underwent a hacker attack during which client data, including the source code of a number of developments, were stolen. Later, another confidential data appeared on the network, including scanned copies of internal and foreign passports of company employees.

"As we reported earlier, SoftServe experienced a cybersecurity incident on Tuesday, September 1. It was a complex, multi-step and targeted attack against our company. As a result of the attack, the company's mail server was damaged, a number of corporate services were disabled, and the internal file server was compromised,” noted SoftServe.

The attackers managed to download fragments of various information, and in order to put pressure on the company, they made them publicly available.  SoftServe expects new incidents and declares its readiness for them.

"We expect that new data can be published again and are ready for it. Such actions of attackers, as well as various kinds of provocations and the spread of fakes to escalate the situation are a common tactic in hacker attacks. As noted earlier, SoftServe managed to localize the attack within a few hours after the attack and our team quickly restored the operation of corporate systems that function normally,” noted the company on its Facebook page.

The company also said that SoftServe is currently operating normally and has a "clear plan to deal with the consequences" of the incident. The company promises technical, legal, financial, and other assistance to anyone who suffered from the attack.

SoftServe has engaged one of the world's cybersecurity experts to independently investigate the incident.

White House To Update U.S’s Approach To Its Maritime Cybersecurity Strategy In Coming Months

 

With hopes to upgrade the U.S. government's approach to deal with its maritime cybersecurity strategy in the coming months, the Trump administration is presently attempting to improve and further secure down the United States' ability to 'project power at sea' and guard against adversarial cyberattacks. 
Their plan incorporates re-evaluating the national approach to deal with data sharing and better emphasizing the utilization of operational technologies in ports, as per one senior administration official. 

When two officials were approached to comment they declined on revealing any particular data about the administration's plans, saying more info would be very soon be made public. 

Yet, hackers have already begun their work, they have been for long focusing on shipping firms and the maritime supply chain to steal any data associated with the U.S. government or intrude on cargo operations and activities. 

Utilizing a strain of ransomware known as Ryuk, the hackers have undermined computer networks at a maritime transportation office a year ago simultaneously disrupting tasks for 30 hours, as per the U.S. Coast Guard. 

This declaration comes in the midst of a few endeavors at the Department of Defense to test preparedness and readiness against cyberattacks in the maritime domain. 

The Pentagon's offensive unit, Cyber Command, duplicated a cyberattack a year ago on a seaport. The Army is likewise taking an interest in an activity intended to 'simulate adversaries' focusing on U.S. ports this month. 

As of late, the Trump administration has been worried about a ransomware attack focused explicitly on a transportation organization, “affected COVID-19 supply chains in Australia,” which one senior organization official said.

 “Adversaries frequently interfere with ship or navigation systems by targeting position or navigation systems through spoofing or jamming, causing hazards to shipping,” one senior administration official said.