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Enterprises Improving Their Response to Cybersecurity Incidents, Yet Contributing To Reduce the Effectiveness of Defense

IBM recently released the results of a global survey, which recommended that while investment and planning are on the uptake, adequacy ...

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Indians to use VPN as a way to evade ban on Chinese Apps


It seems like people have found a way to circumvent government's ban on 59 Chinese Apps including favorites like TikTok, Share it, Shien, Clash of Kings, and many more and have moved on to use VPN (Virtual Private Network) to access these apps.


Right after the ban announcement by government companies like SatoshiVPNS put an advert on their social media stating, Ann investment in a VPN is an investment that always pays for itself — many times over.” There have been articles on blabberpost and others recommending how and which VPN to use to access the banned applications.

And it's not the first time Indians have turned to VPN to dodge regulations, in fact, we are quite notorious when it comes to VPN. After Reliance Jio, Bharti Airtel and Vodafone Idea - the largest telecom providers in the country- took down porn websites from their network, India fell only three steps from 12 to 15 in terms of visitors to Pornhub. A 2019 report from Pornhub revealed that 91% of Indian users access the site via mobile phone.

 Since February, India has seen a growth of 15% in VPN usage, according to a report by ExpressVPN; the global average stands at 21%. 

By the books, using VPN is not illegal in India for as much as it's not used for any illegal activity. The most common use of a VPN in the country is either to watch pornography or to access torrents and both of these do not summon legal actions.

Since the suspension of Internet service from August 2019 till March 2020 in the Kashmir Valley and the aftermath of weak 2g and 3g networks, many citizens turned to VPN in order to reach blocked content Facebook, Twitter, and other social media sites. The government even arrested some for using VPN to promote unlawful activities.
after the ban, Google and Apple App Store removed TikTok and Helo for Indian users but other banned apps like Browsers, Club Factory, Shein, ShareIT, and Clash of Kings are still listed on both the stores.

The Public Chamber of the Russian Federation reported a DDoS attack on its website


The website of the Public Chamber (OP) of Russia was attacked by hackers. The site of the project on the fight against fakes at all levels feikam[.]net was also subjected to a DDoS attack. Currently, there is no access to sites, an error appears when trying to access them.

Alexander Malkevich, the head of the expert advisory group of the Public Chamber of Russia on public control of remote electronic voting, said that the attack began after the end of receiving votes from online voters.

In his opinion, the attack is connected with the active work of the Public Chamber of the Russian Federation to expose fakes about the all-Russian vote on amendments to the Constitution.

"In the evening of June 30, after the official end of the online voting process, the website of the Public Chamber of the Russian Federation was attacked by hackers who managed to interrupt its normal operation for a while. This is very similar to the retribution of those who were prevented by members of the Chamber from wreaking havoc during the voting, especially considering that there was the hack of the site http://feikam.net/  at the same time," he noted.

According to Mr. Malkevich, 5 thousand fakes were found on the Internet, and their number has grown several times as the voting began to approach. Earlier, he noted that mostly false information about the amendments to the Constitution is distributed through the media-foreign agents and in social networks.

It's important to note that All-Russian voting began on June 25 throughout Russia and lasted until July 1. On it, citizens were asked whether they approve of the amendments to the Constitution. The "Yes" and "No" options were indicated in the Bulletin. The main amendment is the nullification of Vladimir Putin’s presidency so that he can become president again.

Google Playstore Removes 25 Android Apps that Stole User Login Credentials


In a recent cybersecurity incident, Google cleared 25 applications from its google play store as they were alleged to steal the users' FB credentials. According to Google, these applications were downloaded for around 2..35 million before the play store decided to shut them down. All these 25 applications were created by the same developer, even though they seemed to work differently and offer different features, they were all peas in a pod.


These apps showed themselves as a video editor, photo editor, wallpaper apps, file managing apps, mobile gaming apps, and flashlight apps., says Evina, a France based cybersecurity organization. When the firm came to know about the incident, it reported to Google, and precautionary measures were taken immediately to protect the end-users. The malware was also reverse-engineered so that no damage could take place. The 25 apps had malware embedded in them, which stole FB login credentials whenever the user launched the FB application.

Although the apps worked legally, they, however, had hidden malicious codes. The code could tell about the recently launched app in the user's device. If it were FB, these apps would create a fake login page that looked the same as the original to steal the user's login credentials. If the user entered his login credentials, the app would capture the data and transfer it to a remote server domain. When Google came to know about the issue after Evina's claims in May, it verified it before taking down these apps. Playstore removed these 25 apps earlier this month, some of which had been in use for more than a year.

"When an application is launched on your phone, the malware queries the application name. If it is a Facebook application, the malware will launch a browser that loads Facebook at the same time. The browser is displayed in the foreground, which makes you think that the application launched it. When you enter your credentials into this browser, the malware executes javascript to retrieve them. The malware then sends your account information to a server," said Evina in a blog post.

DDoSecrets Banned From Twitter ; But Has No Plans To Slow Down



For the past year and a half, a rather small group of activists known as Distributed Denial of Secrets, or DDoSecrets, has discreetly yet consistently released a flood of hacked and leaked documents, from Russian oligarchs' emails to the stolen communications of Chilean military leaders to shell company databases.

A few weeks ago, the group released its most prominent break yet: BlueLeaks, a 269-gigabyte collection of approximately a million police files provided to DDoSecrets by a source lined up with the hacktivist group Anonymous, spanning emails, audio files, and interagency updates pulled from law enforcement "fusion centers," which fill in as intelligence sharing hubs. 

As indicated by DDoSecrets, it speaks to the biggest ever release of hacked US police data. It might make DDoSecrets famous as the beneficiary to WikiLeaks' mission—or at least the one it clung to in its previously more optimistic years—and the inheritor of its ceaseless battles against critics and censors. "Our role is to archive and publish leaked and hacked data of potential public interest," writes the group's co-founder, Emma Best, a longtime transparency activist, in a text message interview. "We want to inspire people to come forward, and release accurate information regardless of its source." 

As the media's focus developed around the BlueLeaks release, Twitter proceeded to ban the group's account, referring to a policy that it doesn't permit the distribution of hacked data. 

The company caught up with a significantly progressively step, eliminating tweets that link to the DDoSecrets website, which keeps up an accessible database of the entirety of its leaks, and suspending a few accounts retroactively for linking to the group's material. 

Be that as it may, DDoSecrets, an organization with no proper address and whose careful budgeting runs for the most part on donations, is as yet strategizing a reaction and the best workaround to further 'publicize its leaks' —conceivably moving to Telegram or Reddit—however has no goal of letting the ban stop its work. Together with BlueLeaks, however, DDoSecrets has, for the first time went ahead to release a significant leak of documents from US organizations, upping the ante. 

Activists and journalists going through the documents promptly discovered evidence that the FBI had monitored the social accounts of protesters for local law enforcement and tracked bitcoin donations to protest groups. The leak likewise incorporates personally recognizable data about police officers and in any event, banking details. 

However, Best, who has teamed up with WikiLeaks previously, relates to the pronouns they/them, says that DDoSecrets has gained from WikiLeaks' mistakes just as its successes. 

 She additionally blames Assange explicitly for attempting to conceal the fact that specific documents are provided by state-sponsored hackers, as when he implied that the documents take from the Democratic National Committee and the Clinton Campaign may have originated from murdered Clinton staff member Seth Rich. 

DDoSecrets is additionally taking an altogether different tack from WikiLeaks in securing the anonymity of sources. As it has quit facilitating a WikiLeaks-style submission system on a server secured by the anonymity software Tor, as WikiLeaks and most other leaking sites have done. 

The methodology hints that the group considers principled hackers to be as its core sources as opposed to non-specialized leakers or informants within companies says Gabriella Coleman, a hacker-focused anthropologist at McGill University who composed a fundamental book on the hacktivist group Anonymous and is rather friendly with a portion of DDoSecrets' staff.

Nonetheless, as experts have spoken out on this issue it is clearly evident that the Twitter ban following its BlueLeaks publication represents a major setback for the group.