Search This Blog

Latest News

Hackers spy on Corporate networks via emails and FTP

Chinese security firm Qihoo 360 reported that since December 2019, a miscreants group has been hacking into DrayTek enterprise routers to ...

All the recent news you need to know

Check Point: 56 apps from the Google Play Store hide a new dangerous malware


Check Point experts have identified a new family of malware in the Google Play Store. It was installed in 56 Google Play Store apps that have been downloaded almost a million times by users worldwide. 24 apps among the damaged 56 are children's games, as well as utilities such as calculators, translators, cooking apps and others. As it is specified, applications emulate the behavior of a real user.

Tekya malware uses the MotionEvent mechanism in Android that simulates a click on an ad banner (first discovered in 2019) to simulate user actions and generate clicks.

Imitating the actions of a real person does not allow the program or a third-party observer to understand the presence of fraud. This helps hackers to attack online stores, make fraudulent ads, promote advertising, promote sites in search engine results, and also serve to carry out banking operations and other illegal actions.

During the research, Tekya went unnoticed by the VirusTotal and Google Play Protect programs.
Hackers created copies of official popular apps to attract an audience, mostly children since most apps with Tekya malware are children's games.

However, the good news is that all infected apps have already been removed from the Google Play.
This case shows that malicious app features can still be found in Google Play. Users have access to almost 3 million apps in the Google Play Store, and hundreds of new ones are downloaded daily, making it difficult to check the security of each individual app.

Although Google is taking steps to ensure security and prevent malicious activity on the Google Play Store, hackers are finding ways to access users' devices through the app store. So, in February, the Haken family of malware was installed on more than 50 thousand Android devices through various applications that initially seemed safe.

Home Routers Hijacked to Deliver Info-Stealing Malware 'Oski'


The spread of malware through apps being downloaded by users in the name of 'the latest information and instructions about COVID-19' is amongst one of the most prevalent threats that have been observed since the outbreak of the novel Coronavirus. As a result, users were forced to download apps such as COVID19Tracker or Covid Lock from a website, the app locked victims outside their smartphones and asked for a ransom of $100 in Bitcoin for the release of their data. Consequently, attackers threatened them to leak all their contacts, media, and social media accounts online in case they failed to pay the ransom in due time.

Users are being severely targeted amid the COVID-19 themed malware and data exploit attacks, another example resides in the discovery of a new type of attack that is targeting home routers. It redirects victims to an infected website after altering the DNS settings and then drops a file-encrypting malware 'Oski' that encrypts the important files on a victim's system. It employs a sophisticated algorithm to encrypt the files and append .Osk extension to each file. After successfully carrying out the encryption process, the malware leaves a ransom note in all the folders containing encrypted, reading, "HOW TO RECOVER ENCRYPTED FILES.TXT.'

"To make the file seem legitimate (as if the filename is any indication of legitimacy), attackers named it “runset.EXE”, “covid19informer.exe”, or “setup_who.exe”." states the Bitdefender's report on the subject.

Attackers with the malicious intent of compromising the routers go around the internet searching for the exposed home routers that are consequently subjected to 'password brute-forcing attack' with DNS IP settings being altered alongside.

DNS is an internet service that plays a crucial role in translating domain names to IP addresses and as it assists browsers in loading internet resources if the cybercriminals alter the DNS IP address from a vulnerable router they are meaning to attack, they resolve the victim's request to any website under their control. The targeted domains in this campaign include aws.amazon.com, tidd.ly, goo.gl, bit.ly, fiddler2.com, washington.edu, winimage.com, imageshack.us, ufl.edu, disney.com, cox.net, xhamster.com, pubads.g.doubleclick.net and redditblog.com. As per sources, most of the aforementioned routers that made to the attacker's target list are based in France, Germany, and the US.

"It’s recommended that, besides changing the router’s control panel access credentials (which are hopefully not the default ones), users should change their Linksys cloud account credentials, or any remote management account for their routers, to avoid any takeovers via brute-forcing or credential-stuffing attacks," Bitdefender warns.

Russian Security Services Track Down Colossal Credit Card Fraud Ring


Russian Security Services (RSB) has tracked down and charged an international credit card fraud ring arresting 25 accused. The carding kingpin is suspected to be linked with dozens of carding shops and with some of the most significant data breaches plaguing the Western World. FSB, the Russian Federal System, issued a statement this week stating they arrested 25 individuals accused of circulating illegal means of payment tied with around 90 websites that sold stolen credit cards. Though the FSB did not release a list of names, a blog LiveJournal by cybersecurity blogger Andrey Sporov leaked the details of the raid and exposed that the infamous hacker Alexey Stroganov, who goes by the hacker names "Flint" and "Flint24" was also among the arrested.


According to Intel 471, a cyber intelligence firm Stroganov is with some of the major cyber threats since 2001. Stroganov and his associate Gerasim Silivanon (a.k.a. "Gaborik ") were also sentenced to six years of imprisonment in Russia in 2006 but were out in two years. "Our continuous monitoring of underground activity revealed despite the conviction, Flint24 never left the cybercrime scene," reads an analysis by Intel 471. "You can draw your conclusions [about why he was released early]," Sporaw wrote, hinting at the use of unfair means to get out of jail early. Flint is one of the big players of the stolen credit card market, working as a wholesaler of credit card data with cyber crooks who bought these cards from him in bulk - 100,000 pieces at once.

Various cyber forums say that Stroganov and his guys were caught because they broke "the golden rule" of hackers from Soviet countries- never target your country people or bank. Flint's "Trust Your Client" These carding sites had a standard scheme they supported to earn trust and loyalty from those who bought these stolen cards. This system allowed their customers to get instant refunds on bad cards without proving that the tickets were canceled by the bank before they could be used. So, these sites installed money-back insurance called "checkers," which can be used by their customers to check the cards (accessible only for a few minutes of buying the tickets) by giving extra money, few cents per card. But slowly, it was claimed that these checkers gave inaccurate results to benefit the card shops.

So, Flint and his gang came up with a policy "Trust your client," through which if the customer claimed that the card was fraudulent, they would get a refund no question asked but only within six hours of buying the ticket. But they probably had their checkers too for checking bad cards.

Russian-Based Online Platform Taken Down By the FBI


The Federal Bureau of Investigation as of late brought down the Russian-based online platform DEER.IO that said to have been facilitating different cybercrime products and services were being sold according to announcements by the Department of Justice.

The Russian-based cyber platform known as DEER.IO has for quite some time been facilitating many online shops where illicit products and services were being sold.

A little while back, there happened the arrest of Kirill Victorovich Firsov as revealed by authorities, he was the supposed main operator behind Deer.io, a Shopify-like stage that has been facilitating many online shops utilized for the sale of hacked accounts and stole user data. Convicts ware paying around $12/month to open their online store on the platform.

When the 'crooks' bought shop access through the DEER.IO platform, a computerized set-up wizard permitted the proprietor to upload the products and services offered through the shop and configure the payment procedure by means of cryptocurrency wallets.

Arrested at the John F. Kennedy Airport, in New York, on Walk 7, Firsov has been arrested for running the Deer.io platform since October 2013 and furthermore publicized the platform on other hacking forums.

“A Russian-based cyber platform known as DEER.IO was shut down by the FBI today, and its suspected administrator – alleged Russian hacker Kirill Victorovich Firsov – was arrested and charged with crimes related to the hacking of U.S. companies for customers’ personal information.” - the official statement distributed by the DoJ.

While Feds looked into around 250 DEER.IO stores utilized by hackers to offer for sales thousands of compromised accounts, including gamer accounts and PII documents containing user names, passwords, U.S. Social Security Numbers, dates of birth, and victim addresses.

A large portion of the casualties is in Europe and the US. The FBI agents effectively bought hacked information from certain stores facilitated on the Deer.io platform, offered data were authentic as indicated by the feds.

When asked to comment for the same FBI Special Agent in Charge Omer Meisel states, “Deer.io was the largest centralized platform, which promoted and facilitated the sale of compromised social media and financial accounts, personally identifiable information (PII) and hacked computers on the Internet. The seizure of this criminal website represents a significant step in reducing stolen data used to victimize individuals and businesses in the United States and abroad.”