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1,500 Businesses Globally were Affected by Kaseya Cyberattack

According to CEO Fred Voccola, between 800 and 1,500 businesses around the world have been affected by the ransomware attack.

 

Kaseya, a Miami-based software provider to over 40,000 businesses, reported on July 2 that it was looking into a possible hack. The IT solutions provider for managed service providers (MSPs) and enterprise clients revealed a day later that it had been targeted by a "sophisticated cyberattack." According to CEO Fred Voccola, the ransomware attack has hit between 800 and 1,500 organizations throughout the world. In an interview with Reuters, he said it was impossible to determine the exact impact of the hack because the firms affected were Kaseya's clients. 

REvil, a hacking organization linked to Russia, published a blog on the dark web on Sunday claiming its involvement in the attack. REvil sought $70 million for the data to be restored. REvil has become one of the most well-known ransomware creators in the world. In the last month, it demanded an $11 million payment from the U.S. subsidiary of the world's largest meatpacking company, a $5 million payment from a Brazilian medical diagnostics company, and launched a large-scale attack on dozens, if not hundreds, of companies that use IT management software from Kaseya VSA. 

Kaseya is a company that provides its comprehensive integrated IT management platform to other businesses. It also provides organizations with tools such as VSA (Virtual System/Server Administrator) and other remote monitoring and management solutions for network endpoints. Kaseya also offers compliance systems, service desks, and a platform for service automation. 

According to the FBI, a vulnerability in Kaseya VSA software was used against many MSPs and their clients in the recent supply-chain ransomware campaign. VSA allows a company to control servers and other hardware, as well as software and services, from a remote location. Large enterprises and service providers who manage system administration for companies without their own IT staff utilize the software. 

According to Kevin Beaumont, a security specialist, the REvil ransomware was distributed through an apparent automatic bogus software update in the product. Because the malware had administrator access down to client systems, the MSPs who were attacked were able to infect the systems of their clients.

The attacker quickly disabled administrator access to VSA, according to Beaumont, and then inserted a task called "Kaseya VSA Agent Hot-fix." This phoney update was then pushed out to the entire estate, including MSP client systems. The management agent update was actually REvil ransomware, and non-Kaseya customers were still encrypted. The ransomware allowed hackers to disable antivirus software and run a phoney Windows Defender app, after which the computer's files were encrypted and couldn't be viewed without a key.
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Ransomware

REvil

Windows Defender