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Security is Clearview’s top priority?

Clearview AI’s law enforcement client data stolen in massive breach

Clearview AI an American technology company was, as of late breached as hackers figured out how to exploit a security flaw and 'make-off' its whole client list. Despite the fact that there's a lot of reason of concern, the specific nature and source of the breach remain unknown as of now. The company anyway has emphasized over and over that it has already patched the vulnerability and insists its that servers were not accessed. 

The facial recognition software company has made claims, that not exclusively does its clientele incorporates many police stations, but it purportedly services the FBI and DHS and said that they are exclusively working with law enforcement agencies. 

The Daily Beast's Betsy Swan originally investigated the breach. In the wake of assessing the documents from Clearview AI staff they wrote: 

Clearview AI disclosed to its customers that an intruder “gained unauthorized access” to its list of customers, to the number of users accounts those customers had set up, and to the number of searches its customers have conducted. 

The breach, however, isn't the main issue Clearview AI has to deal with currently. It's additionally entangled in a standoff with an alliance of tech titans hell-bent on seeing it shutdown. The contention comes from the company's utilization of "publicly available" images of peoples from the internet to compile its database. 

Supposedly, Clearview has billions of images in its database of simply peoples' faces. It assembles these images by utilizing a "crawler" AI to scour websites like Facebook, Twitter, and Google Image Search for each accessible picture. At that point, it coordinates the faces with whatever data it can discover on the internet and gives law enforcement access in a convenient application. 

Up until now, the company's gotten cease and desist letters from Microsoft, Google, Venmo, and Twitter. While it's very vague precisely what legitimate response Clearview has now, it seems like it might be going towards a court confrontation like HiQ v. LinkedIn.
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