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Latest "incorruptible" Privacy Method that makes your VPN Out-of-Date

A unique chip that allows computers to send information using a 1-time 'indestructible' connection.

A unique chip that allows computers to send information using a 1-time 'indestructible' connection.

"Experts have made a unique unhackable safety system that is bound to transform the information secrecy," says the University of St Andrews, King Abdullah University of Sciences and Technology (KAUST) and the Center for Unconventional Processes of Sciences (CUP Sciences). The global organization of experts has built a new optical chip that enables the message to be transmitted from the sender to another receiver using a 1-time untraceable transmission that can accomplish 'absolute privacy' as private information is secured as one of the safest means, thanks to the experts. The experts' designed method utilizes silicon chips that carry compact arrangements that are permanently modified to transfer data in a one-time-key that can't be formed again or hijacked by the hackers.



A technology of the future- 
While the present conventional encryption methods permit messages to be transferred instantly, the information can, however, be hacked by quantum algorithms and computers of the future. But, as per the experts' claim, the latest developed technique for encoding information is solid and utilizes present transmission systems. The newly devised method also occupies limited storage on the present computer systems compared to conventional encoded interactions.

“Due to the arrival of more robust and quantum machines and future computers, all present encodings would be deciphered without taking much time, revealing the confidentiality of our existing and past transmission networks that hold much importance. For example, a hacker can save a piece of encoded information that is available now and he can expect the appropriate systems and technologies that can be availed shortly to decrypt the information. Executing large and cost-effective means of world-class safety is a universal enigma," says Dr. Andrea Fratalocchi, Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering at KAUST and Director of the Research.

He further says: Our research, however, has the caliber to resolve the problems of privacy for every individual across the globe. If by any chance this new technique could be executed across the world universally, the hackers would have a hard time trying to break into someone's personal information and would be seeking jobs elsewhere. For the moment, the groups of experts are currently planning to develop business apps for their trademarked technique and are planning to do a demo very soon.
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