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Attack against Saudi Aramco Damages the World's Biggest Oil Producer

The Saudi oil attacks could be a precursor to widespread cyberwarfare — with collateral damage for companies in the region.


With the Saudi government and U.S. intelligence authorities accusing Iran, and Iran accusing the Yemeni rebels, the most recent attack against Saudi Aramco has damaged the world's biggest oil producer and deferred oil production, roiling oil and gas markets.

As of late, Iran has indeed deployed dangerous computer viruses against Saudi Arabia and these attacks have now marked a somewhat "real-world" continuation of this long-stewing cyber war between the two nations, by and by overflowed into other global powers.

Nicholas Hayden, the global head of threat intelligence for cyber intelligence company Anomali, who has served as a cyber-security operator in the electrical sector says that, “There hasn’t been a discernible increase in cyber-attack activity in the region yet but while nothing is standing out right now in the region, there’s a good chance that there are nation-state actors involved, ”

Iran has been notably known for increasing cyber-attacks when it clashes with nations, and that can likewise mean collateral damage in other companies  as well not simply Saudi-owned working together in the area.

“We’re certainly paying more attention than we normally would to that area. When stuff like this happens, we tend to put our ear a little bit closer to the ground.” Says Hayden.

Since, collateral damage is a common symptom of regional cyber conflict, organizations working in Saudi Arabia and beyond ought to likewise be alert for any changes that might hit the region.

The majority of the experts surveyed by CNBC conceded to one end solution, that in spite of the 'economic odds' stacked against them, Iran has turned out to be one of the world's most noteworthy cyber security powers.

John Hultquist, director of intelligence analysis for cyber security company FireEye, included later that, they’ve never been the most technically sophisticated. But they have made up in their brazenness, their willingness to destroy and disrupt. They have really separated themselves on this from others, as if they have nothing to lose.”

Regardless of all this Saudi Aramco yet again declined to comment for the issue when approached.

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Cyber Attacks

Cyber Intelligence

Iran

Saudi Arabia

U.S