Search This Blog

Latest News

Avast Antivirus Harvested Users' Data and Sold it Google, Microsoft, IBM and Others

Avast, a popular maker of free anti-virus software being employed by almost 435 million mobiles, Windows and Mac harvested its users...

All the recent news you need to know

The website of the Echo of Moscow radio station reported a two-week hacker attack


For two weeks, the website of the Echo of Moscow radio station and the computers of its employees have been hacked.

According to Sergey Buntman, First Deputy Editor-in-Chief of Echo, the radio station technically and actually proved that there are attacks not only on the Echo of Moscow website but also on the Echo office, and on computers, computer and Internet communications. Because of this, part of the telephone service is also affected.

"We asked for help wherever we could, both technical, political, and law enforcement agencies. We linked these attacks with certain information, programs. Law enforcement agencies, as I understand it, are now searching for the source of the attacks," said Alexey Venediktov, Editor-in-Chief of Echo.

He said that two weeks ago, powerful hacker attacks began. Their peculiarity was that they attacked not only the site but also the communication channels of Echo of Moscow when programs were broadcast with presenters who are located remotely," explained Venediktov.

In addition, office computers were unexpectedly attacked, due to which Echo Moscow could not receive news from news agencies. "It is very important that they attack Internet communication channels, including from the satellite from which our regional partners receive the signal. These are very experienced, very powerful DDoS attacks. As experts tell us, very large structures have such capabilities," he said, adding that the radio station's specialists have already learned to repel all these attacks.

However, according to Venediktov, the radio station is losing subscribers and advertisers. The Editorial Board drew the attention of the shareholders to this fact, and "the shareholders are worried".

Vulnerability found in Cisco Webex Meeting Suit- Lets unauthorized attackers join private meetings


Cisco Webex Meetings Suite, a platform that offers its customers to organize online meetings and seminars anytime anywhere, has revealed a security vulnerability that allows an unauthorized attacker to enter a password-protected meeting without the password.


The Vulnerability -
The vulnerability allows the attacker to join a meeting if they have the meeting ID or meeting URL from the mobile device browser. Then the browser will launch the meeting on Webex mobile application, and then the unauthenticated user can join the password-protected meeting without the said browser. “The unauthorized attendee will be visible in the attendee list of the meeting as a mobile attendee,” reads the Cisco blog post.

This makes it quite easy to track the unauthorized individual as they will be visible as a mobile attendee. This Cisco Webex vulnerability has received a score of 7.2 out of 10 (can be tracked as CVE-2020-3142). Cisco Product Security Incident Response Team (PSIRT) said that they have not yet faced an attacker exploiting the vulnerability. Versions with the vulnerability - The vulnerability is seen in Cisco Webex Meetings Suite sites and Cisco Webex Meetings Online versions earlier than 39.11.5 and 40.1.3. Though Cisco says that the Webex meeting server is unaffected with the vulnerability.

After discovering the vulnerability, Cisco has now released a new version fixing the vulnerability in versions 39.11.5 and later 40.1.3 for Cisco Webex Meetings Suite sites and Cisco Webex Meetings Online sites. “The fix applies to Cisco Webex Meetings Suite sites and Cisco Webex Meetings sites only. Customers are not required to update the Cisco Webex Meetings mobile application or the Cisco Webex Meetings desktop application.”

Cisco recently fixed 11 more bugs in Cisco Data Center Network Manager when the faults let hackers RCE, SQL Injection, and Authentication Bypass Attacks. Cisco is expected to fix the bug soon. The users are advised to stay careful of any suspicious activity and report to the company immediately if they found any malicious activity on the platform.

Understand how SIM Swapping can easily be used to hack your accounts!

We've all heard about sim swapping, SIM splitting, simjacking or sim hijacking- the recent trend with cybercriminals and now a study by Princeton University prooves the vulnerability of wireless carriers and how these SIM swapping has helped hackers ease their hands into frauds and crimes.



SIM swapping gained quite an attention when Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey’s account was hacked on his own platform. A study by Princeton University has revealed that five major US wireless carriers - AT&T, T-Mobile, Verizon, Tracfone, and US Mobile - are susceptible to SIM swap scams. And this sim hijacking is on a rise in developing countries like Africa and Latin America.

What is SIM swapping? 

SIM swapping is when your account is taken over by someone else by fraud through phone-based authentication usually two-factor authentication or two-step verification. This could give the hacker access to your email, bank accounts, online wallets and more.

How does the swap occur? 

In a SIM swap, scammers exploit the second step in two-factor verification, where either a text message or a call is given to your number for verification.

Citywire further explains the process, "Usually, a basic SIM-card swapping work when scammers call a mobile carrier, impersonating the actual owner and claiming to have lost or damaged their SIM card. They then try to convince the customer service representative to activate a new SIM card in the fraudster’s possession. This enables the fraudsters to port the victim’s telephone number to the fraudster’s device containing a different SIM."

After accessing the account, the scammers can control your email, bank accounts, online wallets and more.

 Detecting SIM swapping attack

• The first sign is if your text messages and cell phones aren't functioning, it's probable that your account is hijacked.

• If the login credentials set by you stop working then it's probably a sign that your account has been taken over. Contact your telecom provider and bank immediately.

• If you get a message from your telecom provider that your SIM card has been activated on another device, be warned it's a red sign.

Researchers And Army Join Hands to Protect the Military’s AI Systems


As an initiative to provide protection to the military's artificial intelligence systems from cyber-attacks, researchers from Delhi University and the Army have joined hands, as per a recent Army news release. 

As the Army increasingly utilizes AI frameworks to identify dangers, the Army Research Office is investing in more security. This move was a very calculated one in fact as it drew reference from the NYU supported CSAW HackML competition in 2019 where one of the many major goals was to develop such a software that would prevent cyber attackers from hacking into the facial and object recognition software the military uses to further train its AI.

MaryAnne Fields, program manager for the ARO's intelligent systems, said in a statement, "Object recognition is a key component of future intelligent systems, and the Army must safeguard these systems from cyber-attack. This work will lay the foundations for recognizing and mitigating backdoor attacks in which the data used to train the object recognition system is subtly altered to give incorrect answers."


This image demonstrates how an object, like the hat in this series of photos, can be used by a hacker to corrupt data training an AI system in facial and object recognition.

The news release clearly laid accentuation on a very few important facts like, “The hackers could create a trigger, like a hat or flower, to corrupt images being used to train the AI system and the system would then learn incorrect labels and create models that make the wrong predictions of what an image contains.” 

The winners of the HackML competition, Duke University researchers Yukan Yang and Ximing Qiao, created a program that can 'flag and discover potential triggers'. And later added in a news release, "To identify a backdoor trigger, you must essentially find out three unknown variables: which class the trigger was injected into, where the attacker placed the trigger and what the trigger looks like," 

And now the Army will only require a program that can 'neutralize the trigger', however, Qiao said it ought to be "simple:" they'll just need to retrain the AI model to ignore it. 

And lastly, the software's advancement is said to have been financed by a Short-Term Innovative Research that grants researchers up to $60,000 for their nine months of work.