Yahoo revamps security to protect users' data from NSA


Yahoo says they have introduced few improvements in encrypting the users' data in an attempt to prevent cyber attacks and Government surveillance.

Alex Stamos, who recently joined Yahoo as Chief Information Security Officer, said that traffic moving from one Yahoo's data center to another is fully encrypted as of March 31.

The move came after whistleblower Edward Snowden leaked documents that alleged that traffic from Google and Yahoo data centers were being intercepted by NSA.

Yahoo has enabled encryption of mail between its servers and other mail providers.  Search requests made from Yahoo homepage are also now automatically being encrypted. 

Yahoo is promising to release a new, encrypted, version of Yahoo messenger within next few months.

"In addition to moving all of our properties to encryption by default, we will be implementing additional security measures such as HSTS, Perfect Forward Secrecy and Certificate Transparency over the coming months. This isn’t a project where we’ll ever check a box and be 'finished.' " Stamos wrote in the blog post.

"Our fight to protect our users and their data is an on-going and critical effort. We will continue to work hard to deploy the best possible technology to combat attacks and surveillance that violate our users’ privacy."he added.

Canadian Spy agency with help of NSA tracked passengers who used free airport WiFi


Image Credits: Kaspersky
Here is another example why public WiFI networks pose a potential risk to your data.

A report from CBC News based on newly leaked secret document by former U.S. security contractor Edward Snowden reveals that Canadian spy agency was spying on the passengers who used free WiFi service in airports.

The Communications Security Establishment Canada (CSEC) is prohibited from spying on Canadians without a warrant.  However, they have collected metadata about all travelers passing through Airport including Canadians.

The document presented to the CBC shows the captured information from travelers' devices was then helped the spy agency to track them for a week or more as their wireless devices connected to any other Wi-FI hot spots in locations around Canada and event at US airports.

According to CBC, the leaked document suggests that operation was a trial run of a new software developed by CSEC with the help US's National security Agency(NSA).

Two largest Canadian airports - Toronto and Vancouver - and Boingo, a largest independent WiFi services supplier at other airports, have denied the involvement in providing any information of WiFi users.

'Leaky apps' like Angry Birds allows NSA and GCHQ to spy on you


Do You know while you are busy in hitting the pigs in angry birds game, US and UK Spy agencies collecting your personal data?

A recently leaked classified documents by whistleblower Edward Snowden show NSA and GCHQ have been working to develop ways to collect your personal information from so-called "leaky" phone apps.

According to Guardian,  Such apps allow the spy agencies to collect information including phone details and personal info such as age, gender and location and in some cases even sexual orientation.

One of the slides titled "Golden Nugget" shows how NSA able to obtain phone type, buddy lists, "possible image",location and other data, when a user upload a photo taken via mobile.


Many social networking sites such as facebook removes the EXIF metadata(which contains the geolocation details). Guardians points out that agencies still can collect those data, as it is transferred across the networks.

On the other hand, Rovio, the creator of Angry Birds, said in a press release that it doesn't share any data with spy agencies.  It points finger at the third-party advertising networks.

"The alleged surveillance may be conducted through third party advertising networks used by millions of commercial web sites and mobile applications across all industries" Rovio's statement reads.

NETRA - An Internet spy system to be launched by Indian Government


Think twice before using words like "bomb", "blast", "kill", "attack" in your emails, blogs, tweets, facebook status or any other social network status updates.

Using such kind of words will put you under a surveillance of Indian security agencies.

"NETRA", is an Internet Spy System, developed by Centre for Artificial Intelligence and Robotics (CAIR), a lab under Defence Research and Development Organization (DRDO), which is capable of detecting mala fide message, reports Times of India.

Besides status update in social networks, the NETRA project is capable of capture any dubious voice traffic passing thorough VOIP services such as Skype or Google Talk.

"When Netra is operationalized, security agencies will get a big handle on monitoring activities of dubious people and organizations which use Internet to carry out their nefarious designs," a government official said.