Romanian Cybersecurity firm reveals all-in-one espionage tool: RadRAT

Bitdefender, a Romanian Cybersecurity firm, has flushed out a powerful all-in-one toolkit for espionage operations dubbed “RadRAT,” which it became aware of in February this year. The toolkit is an advanced remote access tool that allows full control over seized computers.

“Buried in the malware zoo, the threat seems to have been operational since at least 2015, undocumented by the research community,” the company said in a post.

RadRAT offers powerful remote access options that allow “unfettered control of the compromised computer, lateral movement across the organization and rootkit-like detection-evasion mechanisms.”

“Powered by a vast array of features, this RAT was used in targeted attacks aimed at exfiltrating information or monitoring victims in large networked organizations,” the post read.

Apart from its data exfiltration mechanisms, it also features lateral movement mechanisms such as credentials harvesting, NTLM hash harvesting, retrieving a Windows password, and more, and its command set currently supports 92 instructions.

These commands can be used for various malicious purposes, including file or registry operations, data theft operations, network operations, operations on processes, system information, propagation, and more.

“Unfortunately, while our information about the behavior and technical implementation of this remote access toolkit is complete, we can only guess at the original infection vector, which is most likely a spear phishing e-mail or an exploit,” the cybersecurity firm wrote in its whitepaper on the toolkit.

Security flaw in uTorrent allows hackers remote access

Tavis Ormandy, a vulnerability researcher at Google and a part of Google Project Zero, a team of security analysts specializing in finding zero-day vulnerabilities, revealed on Wednesday a vulnerability in BitTorrent’s uTorrent Windows and web client that allows hackers to either plant malware on the user’s computer or see their download activity.

Google Project Zero published their research once the 90-day window that it gave to uTorrent to fix the flaw before publicly disclosing it was over.

According to Ormandy, the flaws are easy to exploit and make it possible for hackers to remotely access downloaded files or download malware on their computers using the random token generated upon authentication.

He reported on Twitter that the initial fix that BitTorrent rolled out seemed to only generate a second token, which did not fix the flaw and said, “you just have to fetch that token as well.”


BitTorrent issued a statement on Wednesday regarding the issue:

On December 4, 2017, we were made aware of several vulnerabilities in the uTorrent and BitTorrent Windows desktop clients. We began work immediately to address the issue. Our fix is complete and is available in the most recent beta release (build 3.5.3.44352 released on 16 Feb 2018). This week, we will begin to deliver it to our installed base of users. All users will be updated with the fix automatically over the following days. The nature of the exploit is such that an attacker could craft a URL that would cause actions to trigger in the client without the user’s consent (e.g. adding a torrent).

Zero Day Telegram Vulnerability Exploited by Hackers for Cryptomining

Kaspersky Lab has revealed that in October 2017, they had discovered a flaw in Telegram Messenger’s Windows desktop client that was being exploited “in the wild”. According to Kaspersky, the flaw has allegedly been by Russian cybercriminals in a cryptomining campaign.

The Telegram vulnerability involves the use of an RLO (right-to-left override) attack when the user sends a file through the messenger.

RLO Unicode method is primarily used for coding languages that are written right-to-left, such as Hebrew or Arabic, but hackers can use it to trick users into downloading malicious files. When an app is vulnerable to attack, it will display a filename incompletely or in reverse.

Kaspersky has said that it seems that only Russian cybercriminals were aware of this flaw and were exploiting it — not to spread ransomware but cryptomining malware.

The attacks enabled cybercriminals to not just spread the cryptomining malware but also to install a backdoor to remotely control victims’ computers.

“We don’t have exact information about how long and which versions of the Telegram products were affected by the vulnerability. What we do know is that its exploitation in Windows clients began in March 2017,” read the report Kaspersky published on the flaw.

In the report, Alexey Firsh, cyberthreat researcher at Kaspersky, has outlined several scenarios that show cases of how the vulnerability was actually exploited.

He also wrote that Telegram was informed of this flaw and it no longer occurs in their products.

Security Flaw in Oracle POS systems discovered

Researchers at ERPScan have discovered a new security flaw in the Oracle Micros Point-of-Sale (POS) systems that has left over 300,000 systems vulnerable to attack from hackers.

It was discovered in September 2017 by Dmitry Chastuhin, a security researcher, and was named “CVE-2018-2636”.

Oracle has already issued updates for this issue earlier in the month but due to companies’ fear of unstable patches and losses, it is suspected that it may take months for the patch to reach affected systems.

According to Chastuhin, the POS malware enables hackers to collect configuration files from the systems and gain access to the server.

Hackers can also exploit the flaw remotely using carefully crafted HTTP requests. Many of the vulnerable systems have already been misconfigured to allow such access and are available online to be easily exploited if the patches aren’t used soon.

Patches for the flaw were made available in January 2018 in Oracle’s Critical Patch Update (CPU). More information on the bug can be found here.

New Intel Security Flaw Detected

F-Secure, a Finnish cybersecurity firm revealed on Friday that it has discovered another security flaw in the Intel hardware. This flaw could enable hackers to access corporate laptops remotely.

Earlier it was revealed that the Intel chip had flaws that made almost every smartphone, laptop, or tablets vulnerable to hackers. This flaw is allegedly unrelated to Spectre and Meltdown but is rather an issue within Intel Active Management Technology (AMT).

According to F-Secure, AMT is commonly found in most corporate laptops and the flaw will allow an attacker to take complete control over a user's device in a matter of seconds.

“The issue potentially affects millions of laptops globally," the cybersecurity firm said.

The hacker would need physical access to the device at first but once they had re-configured the AMT, they would be able to effectively “backdoor” the machine and access the device using a remote server, just by connecting to the same network as the user.

There is also a possibility that the hacker would be able to programme the AMT to their own server, thus bypassing the need to connect to the user’s network.

The hacker will be able to access all information on the device after exploiting the flaw and will be able to make changes, download malware, etc. quite easily. No solutions or security measures have been found as yet, other than choosing a strong AMT password or disabling the AMT completely.