Kodak Launches Own Cryptocurrency KODAKCoin — Stocks Surge

In a tie-up with WENN Digital, a blockchain development firm, Kodak photo-centric cryptocurrency, KODAKCoin, causing a 60 percent stock rise after the surprise announcement.

This is a part of a larger initiative called KODAKOne which will reportedly give photographers a new revenue stream and a secure work platform. The blockchain-powered image management system will supposedly create a digital ledger of rights ownership that photographers can use to register and license new and old work.

Kodak CEO Jeff Clarke said in a statement, “For photographers who’ve long struggled to assert control over their work and how it’s used, these buzzwords [“blockchain” and “cryptocurrency”] are the keys to solving what felt like an unsolvable problem.”

Kodak’s choice to move towards blockchain rather than introduce a new social media platform to serve the same purpose has sparked some discussions that the company is trying to capitalise on the current cryptocurrency fad.

KODAKCoin’s initial coin offering opens on January 31st, under SEC guidelines as a security token, and it’s open to US, UK, Canadian, and other investors.

Further information can be obtained on their website.

A Mysterious Malware That Holds The Power To Critically Damage One’s Phone

It wouldn't be wrong to state that Hack forums isn't the most "world class"  or elite gathering of cybercriminals as many of  its members as of now appear to be relative novices, and furthermore it's probable that some post about hacking methods they've never really endeavoured. In spite of the fact that experts do state that with the current buyer showcase in cryptocurrencies, even the refined hacking groups are increasingly getting into undercover or in other words clandestine mining, and once in a while running such operations close by more customary and traditional  cybercrime like data theft and dissent of service attacks.

In the same way as many other people, the hackers on the message board Hack Forums are presently exchanging tips on the most proficient method to make profit with cryptocurrencies. Be that as it may, they're not simply hoping to purchase low and offer high they are only swapping approaches to surreptitiously tackle other people's phones and PCs to further generate digital coins for themselves.

A month ago, F5 networks, a Seattle security firm reported a "sophisticated multi-stage attack" hijacking networks of computers to mine cryptocurrencies.

The assailants have been known to utilize the vulnerabilities in common server softwares, combined with Windows exploits leaked from the National security Agency, to effortlessly infiltrate the victim's systems and migrate through their networking systems.

Despite the fact that it's difficult to know how much these current crypto jacking attacks have earned altogether, yet the addresses connected to the malware variations seemed to have gotten a sum of $68,500 in the cryptographic money (cryptocurrency) monero.

In any case, in the previous year, monero-mining malware has been spotted on an extensive variety of sites, mining the currency as people streamed videos from Showtime and Ultimate Fighting Championship or only browsed the web on compromised Wi-Fi systems at Starbucks cafes. Albeit, some program expansions have been found mining the currency while the users do other things, and monero-mining malware has as of late been spotted proliferating through links on Facebook Messenger also.

Hi @Starbucks@StarbucksAr did you know that your in-store wifi provider in Buenos Aires forces a 10 second delay when you first connect to the wifi so it can mine bitcoin using a customer’s laptop? Feels a little off-brand... 

— Noah Dinkin (@imnoah) December 2, 2017

If you remember the IoT botnets, Mirai in the past, we’ve actually seen one variant this year which was mining monero coins on routers and hard disk recorders as well,” says Candid Wueest, principal threat researcher at Symantec and contributing author on a report the security company released on cryptojacking last month.

Creators of some monero-mining software argue that in-program (browser) mining can have a true blue use, letting people intentionally exchange computer power for access to articles, videos, or premium application features, when sites are looking past publicizing or advertising as an income and revenue stream. "I don't agree with anybody's computer being mishandled or abused without their insight," says Spagni, the monero core developer.

"However the technology that is being manhandled presents a completely new approach for monetizing a service on the web." He contends this could empower a "free" version of Netflix or provide another subsidizing stream for journalism.

Coinhive one of the most well-known web miners, even offers a mining-based captcha alternative, aimed at making it less attainable for spammers to play out specific activities on a website, and a version of the software called AuthedMine which requires the users to unequivocally opt in before mining begins. Makers of other mining tools put forth comparable expressions about user consent, maybe with changing degrees of sincerity.

Nevertheless a tool called Monero Quiet Excavator, available for $14, mines in the background on Windows PCs. It doesn't launch a visible window that users can recognize or detect as fast as possible, keeps the gadgets from going into sleep mode, and can "bypass firewalls," as indicated by its website. In any case, its developer states that it is intended just for "legitimate users". Those could incorporate individuals who possess various PCs and need to utilize them to mine monero "transparently for the end user or client of the PC"

Ripple passes Ethereum to become World’s Second-Largest Cryptocurrency

Ripple has overtaken Ethereum as world’s second-largest cryptocurrency. Its XRP token climbed more than 50% on Saturday.

In just 24 hours, Ripple rose to as much as $2.20.

Ripple has had one of the biggest growth amongst digital tokens this year, going from less than a cent ($0.006523) in January, to $2.24 on Saturday, which represents a surge of almost 350 times in value.

This could be because of the increase in interest by speculators, as is the case of most cryptocurrencies, but various experts claim that Ripple is worth looking into.

The advantage of ripple, according to its backers, is that it is not just a cryptocurrency but is also used as a digital protocol that acts as a bridge to other currencies and doesn’t discriminate against peers, whether they are using digital money, fiat currencies, or even mobile minutes.

Unlike bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, Ripple follows a centralised system and its owners are known.

Tatkal Ticket Scam Uncovered, CBI Official Arrested

Ajay Garg, an assistant programmer at the Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI), has been arrested by his own agency for developing a software that exploits the vulnerabilities of the IRCTC railway ticketing system to book over 1000 Tatkal tickets at a time.

Ajay joined CBI in 2012 and had been working with IRCTC previously for five years (2007-2011).

Rather than reporting the vulnerabilities found by him, Garg instead used them for his own gain and amassed a huge wealth by making his software available to travel agents through his accomplice Anil Gupta, who can then easily book Tatkal tickets for clients for a fee using the software.

As seats are limited, by the time the users fill in their details, the Tatkal quota is already booked. So the users turn to travel agents who can book these tickets using the software. These tickets are genuine and the payments of the tickets go to the railways, according to officials.

However, in addition to the cost of the software, there is a charge on every ticket booked using the software, which is paid to Garg using a complex system of Indian and foreign servers, online masking, and cryptocurrencies like bitcoin.

“Use of such software is illegal as per rules and regulations of IRCTC and also under the Railways Act,” Abhishek Dayal, CBI spokesperson, said.

Garg and Gupta, along with 13 others including Garg’s family members and travel agents, have been arrested.

According to Dayal, the CBI has carried out searches at 14 locations in Delhi, Mumbai, and Jaunpur during which it recovered Rs 89.42 lakh in cash, gold jewellery valued at Rs 61.29 lakh, 15 laptops, 15 hard disks, 52 mobile phones, 24 SIM cards, 10 notebooks, 6 routers, 4 dongles, and 19 pen drives.

Both Garg and Gupta have been sent to a five-day CBI custody by a court.


Bitcoin Exchange Files for Bankruptcy After Being Hacked Again

Earlier this week, a major South Korean bitcoin exchange, Youbit, was hacked for the second time in less than 8 months. It has since filed for bankruptcy after releasing that the hackers had stolen 17% of its digital currency reserves.

The exchange trades ten virtual currencies, including bitcoin and ethereum.

Youbit says that the hackers had attacked its “hot-wallet”, which is an account kept online for holding crypto assets, and that its offline, cold-storage holdings are safe and still accessible, adding that all customers will be able to withdraw 75% of their assets once the bankruptcy proceedings are settled.

Allegedly, this attack is an addition to the series of cyberattacks in South Korea, all credited to North Korean hackers targeting the growing market of cryptocurrencies in South Korea.

This hack accentuates the growing concern in the market for the safety of digital currency and holdings.

While with traditional banking, people feel safe with their finances and there is less risk for the customers, cryptocurrencies are highly risky and are increasingly targeted by hackers.

South Korean Newspaper Reports North Korean Hackers Behind Attacks on Cryptocurrency Exchanges

Chosun Ilbo, a major South Korean newspaper, on Saturday reported that according to a South Korean spy agency, North Korean Hackers were behind the theft of about $6.99 million (7.6 billion won) worth of cryptocurrencies this year, which now amount to almost $82.7 million (90 billion won).

The report said that these attacks included the theft of cryptocurrencies from accounts at exchanges Yapizon (now called Youbit), and Coinis, in April and September.

According to the report by the newspaper, the leaks of the personal information of about 36,000 accounts from Bitthumb, a major cryptocurrency exchange, in June were also connected with North Korean hackers, as discovered by the country’s National Intelligence Service (NIS).

Again citing NIS, Chosun Ilbo also reported that these hackers had demanded around $5.5 million (6 billion won) in return for deleting the stolen information.

These hackers were also responsible for another attack on about 10 other exchanges in October which was stopped by Korea Internet Security Agency (KISA), as per the report.

The newspaper also reported that according to NIS, the malware used in the emails to hack the exchanges were made with a similar method to the one used in hacking Sony Pictures in 2014 and the Central Bank of Bangladesh in 2016 and that the email ids used in the attacks were also North Korean.