Adobe Patched Zero-Day Vulnerability




Adobe has recently issued a security update for Flash Player in order to fix a zero-day vulnerability that was exploited by attackers in the wild.

The Flash Player vulnerability (CVE-2018-5002), a stack-based buffer over-flow bug that could empower discretionary code execution, was taken care of on the seventh of June.

The weakness was found and independently made public to a few security firms significantly including the ICEBRG, Tencent, and two security divisions from Chinese digital security mammoth Qihoo 360. Tracked as CVE-2018-5002, it effectively impacts Adobe Flash Player 29.0.0.171 and its earlier versions although it was reported to be settled with the timely release of Flash Player 30.0.0.113.

 “It allows for a maliciously crafted Flash object to execute code on victim computers, which enables an attacker to execute a range of payloads and actions,” said the researchers from ICEBRG's Security Research Team, who were the first to report the discovered vulnerability.

The exploit utilizes a cautiously developed Microsoft Office report to download and execute an Adobe Flash exploit to the victims' PC, as per ICEBRG analysts. The documents were sent basically through email, as per Adobe.

Both ICEBRG and Qihoo 360 discovered evidence that proposed that the exploit was focusing on Qatari victims, in light of the geopolitical interests.

“The weaponized document … is an Arabic language themed document that purports to inform the target of employee salary adjustments,” ICEBRG researchers said. “Most of the job titles included in the document is diplomatic in nature, specifically referring to salaries with positions referencing secretaries, ambassadors, diplomats, etc.”

As indicated by Will Dormann of CERT/CC, other than fixing the actual imperfection, Adobe likewise included an extra dialog window that inquires the users as to whether they want to stack remote SWF records inside Office documents or not. The incite relief additionally comes to settle an issue with Office applications, where Flash content is in some cases downloaded consequently, without provoking the user ahead of time.





A Command Injection Critical Vulnerability Discovered In DHCP




The Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) client incorporated in the Red Hat Enterprise Linux has been recently diagnosed with an order infusion vulnerability (command injection ), which is capable enough to  permit a vindictive mime proficient for setting up a DHCP server or generally equipped for satirizing DHCP reactions and responses on a nearby local network to execute summons with root benefits.

The vulnerability - which is denominated as CVE-2018-1111 by Red Hat - was found by Google engineer Felix Wilhelm, who noticed that the proof-of-exploit code is sufficiently little to fit in a tweet. Red Cap thinks of it as a "critical vulnerability", as noted in the bug report, demonstrating that it can be effectively misused by a remote unauthenticated attacker.

DHCP is utilized to appoint an IP address, DNS servers, and other network configuration ascribes to gadgets on a network. DHCP is utilized as a part of both wired and remote systems. Given that the necessities of utilizing this exploit are basically being on a similar network, this vulnerability would be especially concerned on frameworks prone to be associated with distrustful open Wi-Fi systems, which will probably influence Fedora clients on laptops.

Eventually, any non-isolated system that enables gadgets and various other devices to join without explicit administrator approval, which is ostensibly the purpose of empowering DHCP in any case, is at last a hazard.

This bug influences RHEL 6.x and 7x, and in addition to CentOS 6.x and 7.x, and Fedora 26, 27, 28, and Rawhide. Other operating frameworks based over Fedora/RHEL are probably going to be influenced, including HPE's ClearOS and Oracle Linux, as well as the recently interrupted Korora Linux. Since the issue identifies with a Network Manager Combination script, it is probably not going to influence Linux circulations that are not identified with Fedora or RHEL as they aren’t easily influenced.



Meltdown and Spectre: Breakdown of The recent CPU Security Bug




Much like how Icarus flew too close to the sun.In trying to catch up with Moors law the CPU's manufacturers have left open a serious vulnerability that will haunt us for years to come.

Whats the cause for the vulnerability ?

Almost all modern CPU's have a feature called "Speculative execution" which increases speed by predicting the path of a branch which is most likely to be taken, and will speculatively continue execution down that path even before the branch is completed.

What is Meltdown and Spectre?

Both exploits abuse speculative execution to access "privileged memory" and allows a lower privilege user process to read them.

So why is this a big issue ?

One of the core security mechanisms is isolation of programs. Most programs run in an isolated space and they can only access their own data and information. This stops malicious programs from reading/modifying others. This vulnerability breaks this core security principle and since the vulnerability is in the hardware level any software patch is limited in capacity.

Essentially almost all the rules that protect programs in a computer from each other are now null and void.

How does this affect me ?

This would allow for any process in user memory.  For example, JavaScript running on a browser to read sensitive information in memory eg: sessions, passwords etc. This would also allow programs running in lower privileges to read kernel memory. Cloud service providers who heavily rely on isolation are also affected.

There are innumerable combinations of attacks possible due to this vulnerability. We will be seeing many more "exploits" that make use of this vulnerability for specific systems and programs in the future.
POC:







How are they different ?


Meltdown breaks the mechanism that keeps applications from accessing arbitrary system memory. Consequently, applications can access system memory. Spectre tricks other applications into accessing arbitrary locations in their memory. Both attacks use side channels to obtain the information from the accessed memory location.
Spectre is easier to fix than Meltdown.

Why is it called Meltdown?

The bug basically melts security boundaries which are normally enforced by the hardware.

Why is it called Spectre?

The name is based on the root cause, speculative execution. As it is not easy to fix, it will haunt us for quite some time.

How do I know if I am vulnerable ?

Almost all Intel processor made since 1995 are vulnerable to Meltdown.

Almost all devices Desktops,Laptops,Smartphones etc are affected by Spectre. Vulnerability has been verified on AMD, Intel and ARM processors.

How do I patch ?

Please have a look at this great list that gizmodo provides:

https://gizmodo.com/check-this-list-to-see-if-you-re-still-vulnerable-to-me-1821780843

System Admins Please have a look at:
https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4073119/protect-against-speculative-execution-side-channel-vulnerabilities-in (Requires powershell v5)

Verify that your AV is compatible with the patches:
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/184wcDt9I9TUNFFbsAVLpzAtckQxYiuirADzf3cL42FQ/htmlview?sle=true#gid=0

There have been reports that the patches have cause 10 - 30% reduction in speeds of systems (Which Intel Denies). We might to wait and watch for at least a week to get clarity on this issue.


A note to the security community:

It would be easy to blame the chipset manufacturers and point fingers at them. But we really dropped the ball on this one. What should have been found much much earlier has taken decades to come to light and now it is gonna affect us for years.

Why is that ?

Have all of us been too concentrated on OS,Application,Networking and Web level vulnerabilities that we have completely forgotten to check the base they all run on ?

I think all of us (Including me) should start to looking into how we can help to identify such vulnerabilities in the future.


We should also have a serious look into disclosure time-lines and practices . Who decides how to approach disclosure of such high impact vulnerabilities ? Yes I understand the logic that the "bigger" tech companies are given first priority so that majority of users are patched. But such a long drawn out time-line (This bug was found in June 2017, 6 months ago) seriously puts the small guys at risk as it increases the chances of one rouge person exploiting such vulnerabilities silently.

While the US CERT might have been aware of this vulnerability.Were regional CERT's like CERT-IN informed ? Why not ?

From reading the first set of advisories I can see that only "WESTERN" companies seems to have been aware of this vulnerability before Jan3rd. Why is that ? Does our industry have a bias ? Think on this.

https://meltdownattack.com/#faq-advisory


This also brings in ethically gray issues like this:
https://www.businessinsider.in/intel-was-aware-of-the-chip-vulnerability-when-its-ceo-sold-off-24-million-in-company-stock/articleshow/62359605.cms

Should our CIOS , CTO's and CEO's be allowed to sell company stock once they know that there is security breach or a vulnerability ? Who watches them and ensures compliance ? Are the current laws against insider trading enough ? All such questions that need to answered sooner or later. ..


References:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speculative_execution
https://meltdownattack.com/meltdown.pdf
https://spectreattack.com/spectre.pdf
https://meltdownattack.com/
https://googleprojectzero.blogspot.in/2018/01/reading-privileged-memory-with-side.html
http://blog.cyberus-technology.de/posts/2018-01-03-meltdown.html


Security Vulnerability in McDonald's India allows hackers to access Customer data

 
If you are from India and have ordered Burger in McDonald's, your personal details are at risk.

Security researchers from  Fallible found a serious vulnerability McDonald’s India application that allows hackers to access millions of customer data.

There is no authentication or authorization check in API used in the application.   Sending request to "http://services.mcdelivery.co.in/ProcessUser.svc/GetUserProfile" with customer id in the header allows to access customer details.

The customer id is a sequential number.  All an attacker needs to do is create a script and increase the number to dump all customer data.

"The lack of strong data protection and privacy laws or penalties in India, unlike the European Union , United States or Singapore has led to companies ignoring user data protection" The researcher said.

"We have in the past discovered more than 50 instances of data leaks in several Indian organizations." The researcher said.

The vulnerability allows attackers to obtain name, address, email address, phone number,  Date of birth, GPS Co-ordinates and social profile details.

The researchers reported the issue to McDelivery on 4th February, 2017.  After few days(13th Feb), they received an acknowledgement from the McDelivery IT Manager.  From 7th march,  Fallible tried to contact the McDelivery to know the status.  However, there is no response from their side.  The bug is still not fixed, at the time of writing.

In Jan 2017, a researcher Tijme Gommers found two critical bugs "an insecure cryptographic storage vulnerability" and XSS in McDonald.

Hackers could easily bypass SBI's OTP security

One Time Password (OTP) has become the new security feature on most of the websites, including the banks. This feature allows a user to make online transactions after the identity of the customer is verified by putting the OTP password sent to the registered mobile number from the bank. But who knew this security feature could be easily bypassed and lead to huge loss of money.

A white-hat hacker, bug bounty hunter and web application security researcher, Neeraj Edwards shared his research on how he could easily bypass the OTP of one of the most popular bank, State Bank of India (SBI) and could make the transaction with any amount.



While making a transaction, the last page of SBI’s website shows a One Time Password screen where there is a parameter called ‘smartotpflag is set to Y i.e. smartotpflag=Y’.


Smartotpflag parameter is used to generate OTP, and Y represents ‘yes’ to send the code to the registered mobile. However, the risk factor arises if someone changes ‘Y’ to ‘N’ which means ‘No’. The transaction then will be completed without entering the OTP.


Though after Edwards discovery, the vulnerability was patched but it was highly disappointing that the person who could have easily benefited from this vulnerability, but choose not to, was neither rewarded nor acknowledged for his work.

The press too could not make this important news to the papers, thus keeping the public in dark and keeping the discoverer from any achievement.

The POC Video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2kYm1G2jBcM

DROWN attack risks millions of popular websites

An international team of researchers warned that more than 11 million websites and e-mail services protected by the transport layer security protocol are vulnerable to a new, low-cost attack that decrypts sensitive communications in few hours.

The cybersecurity experts from universities in Israel, Germany and the US as well as a member of Google's security team found that more than 81,000 of top one million popular websites are vulnerable.
The researchers said many popular sites - including ones belonging to Samsung, Yahoo and a leading Indian bank - appeared to be vulnerable.

The DROWN attack works against TLS-protected communications that rely on the RSA cryptosystem when the key is exposed even indirectly through short for secure sockets layer version 2 (SSLv2).

The vulnerability allows everyone on the internet to browse the web, use e-mail, shop online and send instant messages without third-parties being able to read the communication.  It allows attackers to break the encryption and read or steal sensitive communications, including passwords, credit card numbers, trade secrets, or financial data. Under some common scenarios, an attacker can also impersonate a secure website and intercept or change the content the user sees.

While many security experts believed the removal of SSLv2 support from browser and e-mail clients prevented abuse of the legacy protocol, some misconfigured TLS implementations still tacitly support the legacy protocol when an end-user computer specifically requests its use.

Websites, mail servers, and other TLS-dependent services are at risk for this attack, and many popular sites are affected.

In practice, older email servers would be more likely to have this problem than the newer computers typically used to power websites.

In addition, because many of the servers vulnerable to Drown were also affected by a separate bug, a successful attack could be carried out using a home computer.

Though a fix has been issued but it will take time for many of the website administrators to protect their systems.

The researchers have released a tool that identifies websites that appear to be vulnerable.

The SSLv2 protocol was weakened because, at the time of its creation, the US government wanted to try to restrict the availability of tough encryption standards to other countries.

It has since eased its export limits, but the effects live on.